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Keep Eye on Ball: The Hashim Khan Story (2009)

| Documentary, Biography
Squash champion Hashim Khan's athleticism, shrewdness and Pashtun heritage transformed his family's life and put Pakistan on the world map.

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A mostly chronological look at the life, career, and celebrity of Hashim Kahn (c. 1916- ), the world's greatest squash player. At age eight, he picks up a racquet at a British outpost in Peshawar, quits school to play, barefoot, hours every day when the court is empty. In the early 1950s, he's a walk-on at the British open, destroying the reigning champ, and becoming Pakistan's first national hero. The film mixes contemporary interviews of Hashim, his family (also champions), friends, and opponents with photographs and film clips of a young, then middle-aged, squat, friendly, competitive but courtly man winning first in Britain then in the U.S. "Keep eye on ball," he advises. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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Keep Eye on Movie
20 April 2011 | by (Oakland CA) – See all my reviews

Keep Eye on Ball is a documentary about Hashim Khan, a legendary Pakistani squash player who won the British Open (squash variety) seven consecutive times during the 1950s. Born in the badlands of the Northwest Frontier, Khan (who is now over 90 and can still play) went on to win a string of victories that would kick-start a national frenzy for the sport that persists to this day, and his children also became championship caliber players. Based on Khan's biography of the same name, Keep Eye on Ball is the best squash documentary you'll ever see, casting light on a sport most people have never heard of and on a sports dynasty that...well, most people have never heard of. At least, most people who don't play squash and don't live in the Indian sub-continent.


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