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(2012)

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‘The Shape of Water’ Film Review: Guillermo del Toro’s Glorious Romance Blends Horror and Delight

  • The Wrap
‘The Shape of Water’ Film Review: Guillermo del Toro’s Glorious Romance Blends Horror and Delight
In the opening sequence of “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro’s lovely genre-bending love story, there’s a fire at a chocolate factory, prompting a character to note that the smell of toasted cocoa in the air blends “horror and delight.” And while the line might be a tad on the nose, it’s a perfect prompt for the gorgeous and grotesque romance that del Toro (and co-writer Vanessa Taylor, “Hope Springs”) unspools. There are elements of “Beauty and the Beast,” “E.T.,” “Amélie” and “The Creature from the Black Lagoon” at play here, but as always, del Toro takes the stories.
See full article at The Wrap »

Fear Twd Recap: Friends in Dry Places

Fear Twd Recap: Friends in Dry Places
Anybody else have the Golden Girls theme song stuck in their head after seeing Strand’s unique way of saying to Madison, “Thank you for being a friend,” in Sunday’s Fear the Walking Dead? Just me? Huh. Maybe you’re still trying to bleach from your brain images from what was arguably the grossest scene in the AMC drama’s history. Or maybe you’re replaying in your mind’s eye these other, less gag-inducing twists of plot. Read on for all the, er, gory details.

Hope Springs From Darkness’ | Early on in “La Serpiente,” Strand directed Madison and
See full article at TVLine.com »

Trailer Watch: Sally Hawkins Faces Off Against Michael Shannon in Fairy Tale “The Shape of Water”

The Shape of Water

Excitement is building for “The Shape of Water.” Described by many critics as a fairy tale for adults, “Pan’s Labyrinth” writer-director Guillermo del Toro’s latest film just won the Venice Film Festival’s top prize, the Golden Lion, and scored rave reviews out of Telluride and the Toronto International Film Festival. For those of us who haven’t been able to catch the film at a fest, a newly released red band trailer will help tide us over until the thriller hits theaters December 8.

Set against the backdrop of Cold War era U.S. circa 1963, “The Shape of Water” stars Sally Hawkins (“Blue Jasmine”) as Elisa, a lonely and isolated woman who works at in a hidden, high-security government laboratory. The film’s first trailer revealed that she’s “mute and can hear everything, and that Elisa forms an intense connection with a mysterious creature (Doug Jones, “Hellboy”) being held captive in the lab for classified experiments. But much stands between Elisa and the creature’s happy ending — including the fact that one particularly awful lab employee, Strickland (Michael Shannon, “Loving”), is determined to take the creature apart to learn how it works.

This new spot gives a clearer impression of just how menacing Strickland is. “You deliver. That’s what you do. Right? Right?” he says to his reflection in the mirror. We also catch a glimpse of him interrogating Octavia Spencer, who plays Elisa’s co-worker and friend. “He’s coming for you,” she tells Elisa. “You’ve gotta go now and you’ve gotta take that thing with you.”

“It’s monster-led but it’s more ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ as it were,” Hawkins has said of “The Shape of Water.”

The highlight of the trailer comes when Elisa sends Strickland a well-deserved message. Check out the video to see what’s on her mind.

Vanessa Taylor (“Game of Thrones,” “Hope Springs”) co-wrote “The Shape of Water” with del Toro.

https://medium.com/media/c68cffdc8ebbdfca0d566d87f28900e8/href

Trailer Watch: Sally Hawkins Faces Off Against Michael Shannon in Fairy Tale “The Shape of Water” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘The Shape of Water’ Review: Guillermo del Toro’s Glorious Romance Blends Horror and Delight

  • The Wrap
‘The Shape of Water’ Review: Guillermo del Toro’s Glorious Romance Blends Horror and Delight
In the opening sequence of “The Shape of Water,” Guillermo del Toro’s lovely genre-bending love story, there’s a fire at a chocolate factory, prompting a character to note that the smell of toasted cocoa in the air blends “horror and delight.” And while the line might be a tad on the nose, it’s a perfect prompt for the gorgeous and grotesque romance that del Toro (and co-writer Vanessa Taylor, “Hope Springs”) unspools. There are elements of “Beauty and the Beast,” “E.T.,” “Amélie” and “The Creature from the Black Lagoon” at play here, but as always, del Toro takes the stories.
See full article at The Wrap »

Trailer Watch: Sally Hawkins Stuns in Other-Worldly Fairy Tale “The Shape of Water”

The Shape of Water

“If I told you about her, the princess without voice, what would I say?” So begins the first trailer for “The Shape of Water.” The so-called “princess” in question is Elisa (Sally Hawkins), a lonely and isolated woman who works at in a hidden, high-security government laboratory.

Despite her exciting-sounding job, the spot suggests that Elisa’s life is really quite mundane. She wakes up, polishes her shoes, clocks into work, cleans the lab, and wakes up the next day to do the exact same things. But all of that changes when she and co-worker Zelda (Octavia Spencer) discover a huge secret — what we’re told “may very well be the most sensitive asset ever to be housed” in the facility.

Set against the backdrop of Cold War era U.S. circa 1963, “The Shape of Water” centers on the unlikely connection forged by the “asset” — a mysterious creature being held captive in the lab for classified experiments— and Elisa.

The trailer reveals that Elisa is “mute and can hear everything,” and it’s clear that her relationship with the creature transcends language. “When he looks at me, he doesn’t know how I am incomplete,” she explains via sign language. “He sees me as I am.” But the creature is in great danger. A lab employee (Michael Shannon) insists that he needs to “take it apart to learn how it works.”

Vanessa Taylor (“Game of Thrones,” “Hope Springs”) co-wrote “The Shape of Water” with its director, Guillermo del Toro (“Crimson Peak,” “Pan’s Labyrinth”). The fairy tale hits theaters December 8.

https://medium.com/media/59b96104dabda2cdbd65ffa9668eefb4/href

Trailer Watch: Sally Hawkins Stuns in Other-Worldly Fairy Tale “The Shape of Water” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Game of Thrones scribe to rewrite Disney’s live-action Aladdin

Having officially confirmed the casting of Mena Massoud (Aladdin), Naomi Scott (Jasmine) and Will Smith (Genie) as D23, The Tracking Board is reporting that Disney has now enlisted former Game of Thrones scribe Vanessa Taylor (Hope Springs) to rewrite the script for the live-action Aladdin remake.

Taylor is set to rewrite the original screenplay from John August and director Guy Ritchie, who is currently looking to finalise the casting for Jafar and his henchman Iago.

Aladdin will take inspiration not only from the classic 1992 animated movie, but also the original One Thousand and One Nights folk tales. Production was originally slated to get underway this month, before being pushed back due to difficulties in securing the cast.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Charlize Theron’s “Tully” and Brie Larson’s “The Glass Castle” Receive Release Dates

Charlize Theron in “Young Adult”: Phillip V. Caruso/Paramount Pictures

Mark your calendars: release dates for the Charlize Theron-toplined “Tully” and the Brie Larson-starrer “The Glass Castle” have been announced. Variety writes that “Glass Castle,” an adaptation of Jeannette Walls’ 2005 memoir, will hit theaters August 11. “Tully,” Theron’s second collaboration with writing-directing team Diablo Cody and Jason Reitman, will bow April 20, 2018, Deadline reports.

Shot in West Virginia, “The Glass Castle” revolves around the dysfunctional Walls family as they face poverty, addiction, mental health issues, and skirmishes with the law. Larson portrays Jeannette Walls as an adult, while Naomi Watts and Woody Harrelson (“Hunger Games” franchise) play her parents, Rose Mary and Rex. “Glass Castle” also stars Sarah Snook (“The Dressmaker”), Ella Anderson (“The Boss”), and Max Greenfield (“New Girl”).

The comedic drama sees Larson reuniting with her “Short Term 12” director, Destin Daniel Cretton, who wrote the script with Andrew Lanham. IMDb also lists “UnREAL’s” Marti Noxon as a screenwriter. Noxon wrote a previous draft of the script when Jennifer Lawrence was attached to the project, but it’s unclear how much of a role Noxon played once Lanham came on board.

Lionsgate will release “The Glass Castle” on August 11, a weekend that in recent years has been dominated by Meryl Streep. Films like “Florence Foster Jenkins,” “Ricki and the Flash,” “The Giver,” “Hope Springs,” and “Julie & Julia” all had early August openings, and Streep eventually received Oscar nods for “Florence” and “Julie & Julia.” An August 11 premiere could mean good things for Larson come awards season.

Meanwhile, “Tully” centers on Marlo (Theron), a mother of three, and her night nanny, Tully (Mackenzie Davis, “Halt and Catch Fire”). “Hesitant to the extravagance at first,” Deadline details, “Marlo comes to form a unique bond with the thoughtful, surprising, and sometimes challenging young nanny.”

Focus Features has obtained the North American rights and some overseas rights to “Tully.” Among the film’s producers are Theron, Cody, Reitman, Helen Estabrook, and Denver & Delilah’s Beth Kono.

Theron last collaborated with “Tully” screenwriter Cody and director Reitman on 2011’s “Young Adult,” a dark comedy about an emotionally-stunted woman in her 30s (Theron) who decides to win back her high school sweetheart.

You can next catch Theron in “Atomic Blonde,” in theaters July 28. The Oscar winner plays Lorraine Broughton, an undercover MI6 agent working in Berlin during the Cold War. The action-thriller is based on “The Coldest City,” a graphic novel by Antony Johnston and Sam Hart.

Larson can currently be seen in theaters in the action pics “Free Fire” and “Kong: Skull Island.” The “Room” actress’ directorial debut, “Unicorn Store” is currently in post-production, but a release date hasn’t been announced just yet. The Oscar winner will star as Carol Danvers in 2019’s “Captain Marvel,”which will be helmed by “Half Nelson’s” Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck.

Charlize Theron’s “Tully” and Brie Larson’s “The Glass Castle” Receive Release Dates was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

The Space Between Us Soundtrack Available Now

Sony Music Masterworks has released The Space Between Us – Original Motion Picture Soundtrack digitally and physically on CD. The album will also release on vinyl at a later date. The album features original songs by Ingrid Michaelson and the movie’s original score by Andrew Lockington (San Andreas, Percy Jackson: Sea Of Monsters).

The score was comprised of orchestral elements and salvaged items from junk yards to create unique sounds catered to the film’s story. This process of “upcycling” was in line with the film’s message about celebrating the beauty of our planet.

“I loved working with Peter [Chelsom, the director] and Richard [Lewis, producer]. They had a real vision as to what they wanted but also allowed me lots of freedom within that vision. It was a lot of fun to be a part of the movie from such an early stage,” remarks Ingrid Michaelson.

Order on Amazon Here.

The album is now streaming on Spotify.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

A Look Back at Meryl Streep’s Record-Setting 30 Golden Globe-Nominated Roles

A Look Back at Meryl Streep’s Record-Setting 30 Golden Globe-Nominated Roles
Everyone talks about Meryl Streep’s record-setting number of Academy Award nominations, but perhaps even more impressive is the number of Golden Globe Award nominations she’s received: 30, as of this year, with her latest nod for Florence Foster Jenkins.

In fact, the Hollywood Foreign Press seems to be so enamored with Streep that they’ll give her a nomination for pretty much anything (even Mamma Mia!). And now, they’re finally giving her the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures.

In honor of Streep’s incredible feat — only Jack Lemmon has even come close, with
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Collateral Beauty movie review: there is no beauty in this

MaryAnn’s quick take… Appalling and sadistic. How can anyone who is not a sociopath look at this horrible attempt at feel-good fantasy and say, “This is fine, this is healthy”? I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

My god, it’s like we’re living not only in the darkest timeline but in the mirror universe, the one where there is no pity or mercy and the central driving human emotion is self-serving cruelty. This holiday season, Hollywood has given us the creepy, rapey Passengers to serve as a grand romance, and it has given us the sadistic Collateral Beauty to serve as a feel-good fantasy. What has become of us? It cannot bode any good thing about the current state of humanity that the manufacturer and reflector of our sweeping cultural hopes and dreams
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Review: ‘Collateral Beauty’ is a Clumsy, Misguided Drama

Collateral Beauty is soggy garbage intended to make you cry, but it’s so clumsy in its manipulations that you almost feel sorry for it, the way you would if you realized the mugger trying to take your money was holding a fake knife and was actually two kids in a trench coat. You thought this would work? You would think. Bless your dumb heart.

It’s the story of Howard (Will Smith), the head of an advertising agency, who has been a depressed zombie since the death of his daughter two years ago. His business partners — who are also his best friends; it’s important for you to remember that — can’t get him to engage in the business anymore, and they’re losing clients. They want him to sell the company before it goes under, but he refuses to discuss it, or anything else. He just stands in his office all day,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Collateral Beauty’ Trailer: Will Smith Is Forced to Confront Grief in Christmas Drama

‘Collateral Beauty’ Trailer: Will Smith Is Forced to Confront Grief in Christmas Drama
Losing a loved one is a tragedy and sometimes the grief that overcomes a person is so intense that they don’t know how to move forward. In David Frankel’s latest drama “Collateral Beauty,” Will Smith experiences those feelings when he portrays Howard, a successful businessman who has slipped into a depression after the death of his child and doesn’t know how to handle the situation.

The film follows him as his friends, portrayed by Kate Winslet, Micheal Peña and Edward Norton, devise a drastic plan to force him to confront his grief, until something unexpected happens. In a sort of “It’s A Wonderful Life”/“Christmas Carol” twist, Howard, who writes letters to various objects and themes, is visited by three special “people”: Death (Helen Mirren), Love (Keira Knightley) and Time (Jacob Latimore). Together these forces try and show Howard that life is worth living.

Warner Bros. released the new trailer,
See full article at Indiewire »

Collateral Beauty: new trailer, starring Will Smith

Joseph Baxter Simon Brew Nov 11, 2016

Will Smith leads the cast of the incoming Collateral Beauty - and a new trailer has just landed...

Quick update: a second trailer for Collateral Beauty has now landed. And we've got it right here...

Previously...

While Will Smith has tackled a broad range of roles outside of his action-comedy bread and butter, it appears that the upcoming Collateral Beauty might just push him into intriguing new pathological territory. The star-studded ensemble dramatic comedy shows Smith as a tragic figure addled by grief who, in an almost Dickensian manner, receives some tough love by way of the powerful personifications of Death, Time and Love… at least, so we are made to believe.

The Collateral Beauty teaser trailer has just dropped, with Will Smith as Howard Inlet, a successful, formerly extroverted New York advertising executive who has seemingly detached from his work and friends in the
See full article at Den of Geek »

Mechanic: Resurrection movie review: the Jessica Alba-centered fanfic that makes this work

It’s supposed to be intense, but it’s just silly. Unless it’s secretly about one woman ridding the world of notorious arms dealers through sly manipulation. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): hated the first movie

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

About halfway through the idiotic dumbness that is Mechanic: Resurrection — the unasked-for sequel to the cesspit of unthinking nihilism and misogyny that was 2011’s The Mechanic — I found myself drifting into a feminist reverie. What if (I imagined, fancying myself in a better, smarter, kinder world) Jessica Alba’s Gina here were the mastermind pulling all the strings behind the scenes? What if, instead of the damsel in distress she appears to be, she is in fact manipulating all the overgrown boys with guns who get off on throwing violent tantrums, twisting them so that instead of spewing
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Weekend Box Office Preview: ‘Suicide Squad’ Will Live at #1, While ‘Pete’s Dragon’ Fights Off ‘Sausage Party’

  • Indiewire
Weekend Box Office Preview: ‘Suicide Squad’ Will Live at #1, While ‘Pete’s Dragon’ Fights Off ‘Sausage Party’
Critics be damned, but Warner Bros.’ latest D.C. Comics offering, “Suicide Squad,” will again prevail at the box office this weekend, against three new wide releases: “Sausage Party” (Sony), “Pete’s Dragon” (Buena Vista) and “Florence Foster Jenkins” (Paramount). However, it’s unclear whether “Sausage” or “Dragon” will come in second place.

Also up for debate is how much, if any, improvement we’ll see from the same weekend in 2015, when “Straight Outta Compton” dominated a Top Ten that totaled $130 million. Assuming “Suicide” doesn’t replicate the 69% second weekend collapse of “Batman v Superman” (that would place it around $40 million), and the new openings do expected business, $140 million or more is likely.

While holding the top spot for two weekends is always a nice bragging right, the real fate of “Suicide” lies in determining the profit it can eke out against a production and marketing budget of more than $300 million.
See full article at Indiewire »

Frances McDormand: from Blood Simple (1984) to Olive Kitteridge (2014)

1984 is our year of the month for August. Here's Matthew Eng to talk about a treasured actor that made her on camera debut back then...

For the better half of her nearly four-decade film career, Meryl Streep has managed to compel generations of moviegoers to accept a self-styled character actress as not only an acting heroine for the ages but also a bona fide movie star with mass-market appeal and unimpeachable box office credentials. Like no other actress since Bette Davis, Streep has perfected a once-unfeasible practice of playing the sort of idiosyncratic women she has always drifted towards, but within the safe confines of midrange, studio-supported moviemaking that seems to satisfy audience expectations as well as her own.

Sometimes Streep’s projects—and, it must be said, Streep herself—can disappoint. For every quietly graceful gem (like her underrated Hope Springs performance) or skillfully uninhibited turn (as in the
See full article at FilmExperience »

Jason Bourne movie review: Bourne again, but why?

Everything looks great on paper here: Damon’s brawny presence; the smartly staged action, etc. And it’s not unfun. But it feels less black ops than old hat. I’m “biast” (pro): big fan of the Bourne series

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

It’s been nine years since we last saw Matt Damon racing around the world and beating people up as brainwashed assassin Jason Bourne… and the weight of those interim years rests heavily upon this fourth installment. Oh, it’s not that Damon (The Martian, Interstellar), now 46 years old, isn’t up to the physical demands of the role. In fact, his Bourne is significantly beefier here: bigger, more intimidating, just plain more dangerous in an all-muscle kind of way. (Bourne appears to have been scraping out a meager living since we last saw him
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Charlie Kaufman Reflects On His Career: ‘I Feel Like I F*cking Blew It’

Charlie Kaufman Reflects On His Career: ‘I Feel Like I F*cking Blew It’
“I feel like I fucking blew it.”

Charlie Kaufman was talking about his career. More specifically, he was addressing his supposed failure to capitalize on the momentum generated by his scripts for “Being John Malkovich,” “Adaptation” and “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.” Once upon a time, Kaufman’s name was spoken at Hollywood lunches with the same breathless excitement and opportunistic fervor that studio executives tend to reserve for young starlets — back then, he commanded more attention (if not more money) than any other screenwriter since “Lethal Weapon” scribe Shane Black. His potential in the industry seemed positively zoo-sized.

These days, so far as Kaufman is concerned, that’s no longer the case.

“I don’t feel like I’ve got that cachet that I had at a certain point,” he said, looking hard at the table between us. “I see people seizing the moment when they have the
See full article at Indiewire »

Mary-Louise Parker, Chris Noth Wage War In ‘Chronically Metropolitan’ – Trailer

Mary-Louise Parker, Chris Noth Wage War In ‘Chronically Metropolitan’ – Trailer
Exclusive: Here’s a first look at Chronically Metropolitan, having its world premiere next week at the Nantucket Film Festival. Directed by Xavier Manrique (Hope Springs) and written by Nick Schutt (Blood & Oil), the New York City-set film stars Mary-Louise Parker (Weeds), Chris Noth (The Good Wife), Shiloh Fernandez (Evil Dead), Ashley Benson (Pretty Little Liars) and Josh Peck (Ice Age: The Meltdown) and will have its world premiere at the island fest. It’s about…
See full article at Deadline »

Hello, My Name is Doris

Sally Field bounces back in this story of mismatched love - or a romantic delusion... that is 3/4 charm and 1/4 wishful thinking. The May-October romance isn't an outright farce like Harold and Maude, so a few of the comic situations are somewhat wince-inducing. Or am I just feeling my own 'October' discomfort? Field fans should love it anyway. Hello, My Name Is Doris Blu-ray Sony Pictures Home Entertainment 2015 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 90 min. / Street Date June 14, 2016 / 26.99 Starring Sally Field, Max Greenfield, Tyne Daly, Beth Behrs, Elisabeth Reaser, Peter Gallagher, Stephen Root, Wendi McLendon-Covey. Cinematography Brian Burgoyne Film Editor Robert Nassau Original Music Brian H. Kim Written by Laura Terruso, Michael Showalter, from her short film Doris & the Intern Produced by Daniel Crown, Kevin Mann, Riva Marker, Jordana Mollick, Daniela Taplin Lundberg Directed by Michael Showalter

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I've always liked Sally Field. Her personality made a dumb 'sixties TV show
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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