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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 38 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


The Provocative Philosophy in the Cinema of Lars von Trier

26 July 2016 10:50 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

“I feel manipulated by you,” a viewer states to Danish filmmaker Lars von Trier, “how do you feel about that?” Without pause, the director answers, “I feel wonderful.” This is a perfectly succinct summary of his provocative nature, from a man who is a self-proclaimed “manipulator,” and one that is explored extensively in a new video essay by Lewis Bond. Taking a look at all of Von Trier’s filmography, the essay delves into the provocateur’s breaking of traditional cinematic norms with an avant garde approach — through digressions, editing, and other techniques — and how von Trier subscribes to the philosophy that if an artist has some limits, an entirely new type of artistic freedom can be achieved.

Of particular interest is Bond’s insistence that the Melancholia director takes relatable aspects of the human condition and “elevates them to almost metaphysical levels,” which is a wonderful summary of his’s style. »

- Mike Mazzanti

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The Link Jar

22 July 2016 2:00 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

NewsTalk How Cartoon Saloon became a major draw and how those Oscar nominations helped

Playbill Stephen Schwartz says Wicked (the movie) will have several new songs. Geez, it already has a ton of songs. I guess he wants that Oscar.

MTV Frankie & Johnny is Garry Marshall's best film

Variety Idris Elba responds to those endless Next James Bond rumors

Coming Soon Star Wars: Episode VIII (as yet untitled) wraps production. It's due in theaters in December 2017 as these things take time in Post-Production

The Playlist the teasers for all the new Marvel/Netflix TV series: Iron Fist, Defenders, Luke Cage

Towleroad an interview with the stars of Looking 

Comics Alliance Wonder Woman gets her own Us postage stamps for her 75th anniversary this year 

Av Club Brie Larson spoils Room for dumb people on Twitter 

The Retro Set looks back at Judy Garland in her final film I Could Go On Singing »

- NATHANIEL R

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Brady Corbet On His Directorial Debut ‘The Childhood of a Leader’ And The Problem With Movies Today

21 July 2016 9:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

First-time directors who swing for the fences with bold debut films can strike out hard, but actor-turned-director Brady Corbet’s “The Childhood of a Leader” is connecting in a big way.

The period drama premiered at last year’s Venice Film Festival, where Corbet took home the awards for Best Debut Feature and Best Director, and is being released Friday through IFC FilmsSundance Selects label. Corbet co-wrote the screenplay for the film with his partner Mona Fastvold.

Read More: ‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

A dark, post-World War I tale about the seven-year-old son of an American diplomat in France, the film’s largely European cast includes Bérénice Bejo (“The Artist”), Liam Cunningham (“Game of Thrones”) and Stacy Martin (“Nymphomaniac”). Robert Pattinson has a small but deceptively important role in the movie, which focuses on the young, manipulative »

- Graham Winfrey

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‘The Bell Jar’: Kirsten Dunst’s Entire Career Has Been Leading Up To Her Feature Directorial Debut – Girl Talk

21 July 2016 8:38 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present and future.

In the spring of 1999, Sofia Coppola’s feature directorial debut, a big screen version of Jeffrey Eugenides’ novel “The Virgin Suicides,” premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. A delicate, deeply feeling and achingly human portrait of suburban ennui and teenage depression, the film was anchored by a performance by a then-17-year-old Kirsten Dunst. As Lux Lisbon, the prettiest and wildest and most broken of the five Lisbon sisters that the film so intimately chronicles, Dunst was tasked with straddling the gap between deep pain and flickering hope.

The film follows the Lisbons after their youngest sister, Cecilia, twice attempts suicide, completing the act on her second try, all during party thrown by her terrified parents in hopes of cheering her up enough to keep her alive. The Lisbons, by and large, are suffocated by their »

- Kate Erbland

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Kirsten Dunst to direct The Bell Jar starring Dakota Fanning

21 July 2016 2:54 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Melancholia actor is to make her directorial debut with a version of Sylvia Plath’s 1963 novel

Kirsten Dunst is to make her debut as a director with an adaptation of Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar.

Dakota Fanning has been announced in the lead role of Esther Greenwood, a young woman who takes an internship at a magazine in New York before suffering a breakdown and returning home to Boston.

Continue reading »

- Catherine Shoard

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Alexander Skarsgard interview: The Legend Of Tarzan, Leeds

29 June 2016 4:22 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ben Mortimer Jul 5, 2016

The new big screen Tarzan on The Legend Of Tarzan, how living in Leeds turned his life around, and being Alexander Skarsgard...

Once he'd finished his military service in Sweden, Alexander Skarsgard - the new big screen Tarzan - decided to move to the north east of England. Specifically: Leeds. On the eve of The Legend Of Tarzan being released in the UK, we picked things up from there...

How was Leeds, did you like it?

I loved it.

Can you do a Leeds accent?

No, it’s not very good. We ended up there, a buddy and I. We wanted to go to England after high school, we just wanted to go to England to have some fun.

Leeds is a fun place.

The thing is, most of our friends were in London, a lot of people from Sweden in their twenties go to London and »

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The First Trailer For War On Everyone Has Arrived

21 June 2016 3:16 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

With just two feature length films to his name – The Guard and CalvaryJohn Michael McDonagh has established himself as a writer-director to be reckoned with. So much so, that his third movie has taken him across the pond from Ireland, to New Mexico, to wage War On Everyone with Michael Pena and Alexander Skarsgard. What’s more, we now have a trailer to preview the finished product.

War On Everyone has been moving through the festival circuit for some months, and was characterised by our own Matt Donato, at this year’s SXSW, as “a pitch-black, nihilistic riot.” Such praise indicates that this movie promises the full John Michael McDonagh experience – despite the relocated setting, and the absence of stalwart collaborator, Brendan Gleeson.

“Award-winning writer-director of The Guard & Calvary, John Michael McDonagh crosses the globe for his much-anticipated third film, a jet-black action comedy starring Alexander Skarsgård, Michael Peña and Theo James. »

- Sarah Myles

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Michael Peña and Alexander Skarsgård Wage ‘War on Everyone’ in First Trailer

20 June 2016 4:15 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

After melding action with comedy with his debut The Guard, writer-director John Michael McDonagh swayed more toward the dramatic side with his last film Calvary, but now he looks to be returning to the other direction with his third feature, War on Everyone. Starring Michael Peña and Alexander Skarsgård as two corrupt cops, it looks like a darkly hilarious comedy, thanks to the first U.K. trailer, which has now arrived this morning.

We said in our review, “Steering into the frame to the sound of ’70s rock music while giving chase in their muscle car to a fully-costumed, on-foot mime, the impeccably dressed, utterly corrupt police duo of Bob Bolaño (Michael Peña) and Terry Monroe (Alexander Skarsgård) initially appear to be running full-speed towards an even wackier version of the Starsky & Hutch movie we got in 2004. Audiences familiar with the work of director John Michael McDonagh (The Guard, Calvary), however, »

- Jordan Raup

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On my radar: Charlotte Gainsbourg’s cultural highlights

19 June 2016 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The actor and singer on Edgar Degas, a great documentary about Nina Simone, Budapest’s brilliant Turkish baths and Yotam Ottolenghi’s recipes

The daughter of the English actor and singer Jane Birkin and the French musician Serge Gainsbourg, Charlotte Gainsbourg was born in London in 1971 and raised in Paris. She was awarded the César award for most promising actress in 1986, and for best supporting actress in 2000. After roles including Jane Eyre (1996) and I’m Not There (2007), she starred in Lars von Trier’s Antichrist (for which she won best actress at the 2009 Cannes film festival), Melancholia and Nymphomaniac. Her albums 5:55, Irm and Stage Whisper were released between 2006 and 2011. She now stars in Independence Day: Resurgence, out on Thursday.

Continue reading »

- Kathryn Bromwich

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‘The Childhood Of A Leader’ Review: Brady Corbet’s Directorial Debut Is An Enthralling Mind-f*ck

14 June 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A 27-year-old dude from Scottsdale, Arizona, Brady Corbet has somehow become the go-to guy for major European auteurs in need of a young American who can pick up what they’re putting down. We may never fully understand how he parlayed a one-episode cameo on “The King of Queens” and a recurring appearance in the fifth season of “24” into a series of brilliant collaborations with titans of international cinema like Michael Haneke (“Funny Games”) and Lars von Trier (“Melancholia”), but it’s clear why Corbet might have a special appreciation for how public figures are often seen through the lens of their beginnings. With his unusually accomplished directorial debut “Childhood of a Leader,” Corbet delivers a strange and startling film that reflects the unique trajectory of his career, as well as the influence of the iconoclastic directors with whom he’s already worked.

The first strains of Scott Walker’s panicky score slice into the soundtrack like Penderecki having a heart attack, the strings cutting into archival footage of World War I troops marching in formation. The opening titles are draped in terror, and they steel audiences for an ominous origin story on par with the horrors presaged by “Max” or “The Omen.” And on that promise, Corbet delivers — albeit it in his own elliptical, psychically tormented, and increasingly hypnotic way.

The Childhood of a Leader” tells the story of a young American boy (Tom Sweet) coming of age in a snowbound pocket of rural France circa 1918. His young yet severe mother (“The Artist” star Bérénice Bejo) is fed up with her son from the start, and takes out most of her frustration on the various employees who rear the boy for her by proxy. The child’s father (Liam Cunningham, who “Game of Thrones” fans will better recognize by the name of Davos Seaworth), is an assistant on President Wilson’s staff, and is often away in Versailles working on the peace treaty that would ultimately end the war. On the rare evenings during which he returns home, the boy’s father is sometimes accompanied by a widower politician played by Robert Pattinson (a glorified cameo during which he willfully melts into the musty furnishings of Corbet’s sets).

The film seldom ventures outside of the boy’s house, pushing deeper and deeper into the opaque void of its protagonist’s malleable young mind. Corbet’s doggedly anti-dramatic script (co-written by his partner, Mona Fastvold) stakes the boy’s future on a debate between nature vs. nurture in which neither side ever seems to earn a clear advantage. Sweet, whose character is outwardly defined by a blank expression and a head of flowing blond hair (he’s often confused for a girl), delivers a tense performance that often feels modeled after his director’s seething turns in “Simon Killer” and “Funny Games.” You almost never know what the kid is thinking, but it’s telling that his moments of paranoid anxiety are by far his most visceral — an early nightmare sequence suggests that Corbet has a natural talent for eerie visual abstractions.

Read More: Brady Corbet and Mona Fastvold Talk Moody Sundance Discovery ‘The Sleepwalker

He also has a natural talent for the strain of winking, comically exaggerated gravitas that makes it tempting to suspect that hyper-severe auteurs like Haneke and von Trier are actually just taking the piss. Ostentatiously divided into five sections (an overture, three ‘Tantrums,’ and a coda), and refusing to speak the boy’s name until late in the film (so that viewers might tie themselves into knots trying to work out which fascist leader the kid will grow up to become), “The Childhood of a Leader” pits the intensity of its context against the banality of its incident.

The first two Tantrums are all portent and no plot; the most exciting thing that happens is when the boy paws at the breast of his pretty young French tutor (“Nymphomaniac” ingenue Stacy Martin). There’s much talk of language skills, and fluency becomes its own kind of power, but how that factors into Corbet’s grand design is no better explicated than the fact that Sweet’s character is exclusively raised by hired help, or the tidbit that his dad had been hoping for a daughter. And yet, the raw anxiety of Corbet’s vision only grows more palpable as Sweet retreats further from our understanding; by the time the film reveals itself to be more of a mind-fuck than a historical drama, you’re too rattled to feel tricked.

On one hand, the indelibly disorienting final scene feels like a hit from behind; on the other, it feels as though the film has been building to it from the start. Either way, “The Childhood of a Leader” leaves behind a squall of unanswered questions that linger in the mind long after it squelches to a finish. Is this a story about the merits of Freudian psychology, or its limitations? Is it about the making of a monster, or is its distance meant to mock the thinking that sociopaths can be so easily explained? Early in the first Tantrum, Pattinson’s character lifts a quote that novelist John Fowles would ultimately coin in regards to the Holocaust: “That was the tragedy. Not that one man has the courage to be evil, but that so many have not the courage to be good.” Other than Corbet’s promise, that sentiment may be the film’s one clear takeaway: Whether born or raised, leaders are only as powerful as the people who neglect to stop them.

Grade: B+

The Childhood of a Leader” plays at BAMcinemaFest on June 23rd. It opens in theaters and on VOD on July 22nd.

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Related storiesReview: Ti West's 'In A Valley Of Violence' Is A Western 'John Wick,' But Mostly Shoots Blanks12 Must-See Films at BAMCinemaFest 2016'The Childhood of a Leader' Trailer: Robert Pattinson Toplines Brady Corbet's Period Directorial Debut »

- David Ehrlich

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In Happier Cannes Times

24 May 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

on this day in history as it relates to the movies...

1941 Bob Dylan is born in Minnesota, splinters into seven people in front of Todd Haynes' eyes.

1949 Jim Broadbent is born so that we might have Harold Zidler in Moulin Rouge! the film he should have won the Oscar for on the night he actually won the Oscar. Funny how that happens sometimes.

1960 Kristin Scott Thomas is born. Years later she can drop a room temperature or bring it to a boil onscreen in about 2 seconds. We miss her soooo much.

1972 Superhero Glut Producer of the CW, Greg Berlanti, is born.

1991 Thelma & Louise drove into theaters. You've been reading our 25th anniversary retrospective right? Part 3 hits today and we're having a blast revisiting.

2009 The White Ribbon finally wins Michael Haneke the Palme d'Or at Cannes. It goes on to two Oscar nominations for Foreign Film and Cinematography and becomes Haneke's most successful film globally, »

- NATHANIEL R

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Cannes: Curzon Artificial Eye acquires Lars Von Trier's 'The House That Jack Built'

20 May 2016 4:14 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: UK distributor also acquires upcoming sports biopic Borg vs McEnroe, Directors’ Fortnight title After Love and Scottish indie music doc Lost In France.

Curzon Artificial Eye has swooped on four buzz titles at the Cannes Film Festival, acquiring UK and Eire rights to Lars Von Trier’s The House That Jack Built, Shia Labeouf-starrer Borg vs McEnroe, Joachim Lafosse’s After Love and Niall McCann’s Lost in France.

The pre-buy of serial killer drama The House That Jack Built continues the distributor’s long-standing relationship with the controversial Danish director, stretching back to Antichrist and includes Melancholia and Nymphomaniac Volumes I & II. The deal was negotiated with Susan Wendt at TrustNordisk.

The $9.8m project will shoot in Sweden this year, before a Copenhagen shoot in 2017. Zentropa producer Louise Vesth revealed details of the highly-anticipated feature to Screen in Cannes earlier this week, when several early deals were revealed.

The film, originally »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Lars Von Trier’s 'The House That Jack Built' cuts early deals

16 May 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: TrustNordisk secures pre-sales on serial killer feature.

Scandinavian sales agent TrustNordisk has pre-sold Lars Von Trier’s next film The House That Jack Built to Latin America (California Filmes), Benelux (September), Poland (Gutek), Taiwan (Moviecloud), Former Yugoslavia (Cinemania), Czech Republic (Aero) and Romania (Independenta Film 97).

The story is told from the point of view of Jack, a serial killer who aspires to commit the perfect murder over a decade of practice.

TrustNordisk had planned to start sales in earnest after the cast was announced, but found that buyers were very eager to secure the next project from the filmmaker behind Nymphomaniac, Antichrist and Melancholia.

“We knew that Lars was still hot. People are so excited to buy his title at this stage and that makes me very happy. It underlines that Lars is one of the world’s best directors working today,” said TrustNordisk CEO Rikke Ennis

Casting

Producer Louise Vesth of Zentropa told Screen that von »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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Lars Von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’: New Details Emerge

14 May 2016 7:11 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — Star Danish helmer Lars von Trier is preparing to shoot English-language serial killer thriller “The House That Jack Built” in August.

Budgeted at 8.7 million Euros, “The House That Jack Built” was initially developed as a TV series but in February, Von Trier announced that he was turning the project into a film.

Set in Washington, “The House That Jack Built” revolves around a serial killer. The story is told from his perspective and takes place over ten to twelve years.

The film is scheduled to start shooting in August in Trollhättan/Vänersborg and Copenhagen and will premiere in 2018.

The cast will be a combination of American and European actors. Two big male characters and four big female characters, per the producer

The House That Jack Built” is a co-production between four countries: France, Germany, Sweden and Denmark.

TrustNordisk has taken international sales rights. Zentropa is producing, with Film i Väst financing. »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Lars Von Trier's Bad Girls of Cannes

12 May 2016 4:24 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

It's Girls Gone Wild this month at The Film Experience. To coincide with the ongoing Cannes Film Festival, here's Chris on von Trier's wild women from Cannes past.

We miss you, Lars!

It's been five years since reigning Cannes bad boy Lars von Trier debuted a film at the festival - practically eons by the festival's standards for their many favorite auteurs. But he lost their favor for his glib Hitler comments during Melancholia's Croisette visit. The resulting Persona Non Grata Status has left us too long without a Cannes Von Trier (Anti)Heroine. Some call him a misogynist, but the provocateur has consistently given us fully-faceted women fighting against circumstance however they must. Let's take a look at their bad behavior:

Emily Watson as Bess - Breaking the Waves

How Bad?: 7/10 - Lots and lots of self-flagellating sex with strangers. Bess puts herself in increasing dangerous situations »

- Chris Feil

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European Union’s Media Program Celebrates 25 Years of Cultural Support

10 May 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In era of continued friction among European Union states, and an upcoming EU referendum in Blighty that may see the country exit the 28-member state in June, Creative Europe’s Media Program has long been a haven of openness and inclusiveness across the creative industries.

There are seven film in Cannes Competition they have tapped Media funding, including Pedro Almodovar’s “Julieta.”

Founded in 1991 by the EU, the Media Program set out to support collaboration and cultural diversity among European audiovisual players in what was, at the time, a fragmented market. Focusing initially on film content, the program has since diversified its reach to TV and gaming in response to the media sector’s changing landscape.

In the past 25 years, Media has invested €2.4 billion ($2.7 billion) into film, television and video content across development, promotion and distribution within the continent and beyond.

“In Europe, we are very proud of our heritage »

- Diana Lodderhose

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Danish outfit Snowglobe launches with Guerra, Escalante, Reygadas films

4 May 2016 3:11 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Mikkel Jersin, Katrin Pors, and Eva Jakobsen are working on films with Amat Escalante, Carlos Reygadas and Ciro Guerra.

Danish producers Mikkel Jersin (Sparrows), Katrin Pors (The Untamed) and Eva Jakobsen (Antboy) have joined forces to launch Snowglobe, a new production outfit that will back director-driven films.

Snowglobe, which will have a focus on international co-productions, is currently working with established auteurs such as Colombia’s Embrace Of The Serpent director Ciro Guerra and Mexican directors Amat Escalante and Carlos Reygadas.

The company is producing, alongside Guerra’s usual producer Cristina Gallego, his next film Birds Of Passage, which will start shooting in January 2017.

Pors says: “It is the story of an indigenous family from La Guajira Desert who get involved in a war to control a business that ends up destroying their lives and their culture. It’s the story of the origins of drug trafficking in the 1970s in Colombia.”

The company »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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Danish outfit Snowglobe launches with Guerra, Ascalante, Reygadas films

4 May 2016 3:11 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Mikkel Jersin, Katrin Pors, and Eva Jakobsen are working on films with Amat Escalante, Carlos Reygadas and Ciro Guerra.

Danish producers Mikkel Jersin (Sparrows), Katrin Pors (The Untamed) and Eva Jakobsen (Antboy) have joined forces to launch Snowglobe, a new production outfit that will back director-driven films.

Snowglobe, which will have a focus on international co-productions, is currently working with established auteurs such as Colombia’s Embrace Of The Serpent director Ciro Guerra and Mexican directors Amat Escalante and Carlos Reygadas.

The company is producing, alongside Guerra’s usual producer Cristina Gallego, his next film Birds Of Passage, which will start shooting in January 2017.

Pors says: “It is the story of an indigenous family from La Guajira Desert who get involved in a war to control a business that ends up destroying their lives and their culture. It’s the story of the origins of drug trafficking in the 1970s in Colombia.”

The company »

- wendy.mitchell@screendaily.com (Wendy Mitchell)

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Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011 - winners and losers

4 May 2016 2:14 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

As Cannes approaches, Screen recalls what came top (and bottom) of our Jury Grid in 2011 - a year that included The Artist, Drive and a wave of controversy from Lars Von Trier.

In annual tradition, Screen’s illustrious jury of international critics delivered their verdict on the films in Competition at Cannes 2011 - the year that the Palme d’Or went to Terrence Malick for his experimental drama The Tree of Life.

The film marked the elusive Us auteur’s first return to the festival since winning best director for Days of Heaven in 1978.

But Screen’s jury was not as impressed. While The Tree of Life scored a respectable 2.8 out of 4, top marks went to atmospheric Turkish crime drama Once Upon a Time in Anatolia by Nuri Bilge Ceylan, with a score of 3.3.

The film was Ceylan’s fourth in Competition at Cannes, and tied for the Grand Jury Prize with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s [link »

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Cannes archives: Screen's Jury Grid 2011

3 May 2016 11:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

As Cannes approaches, Screen recalls what came top (and bottom) of our Jury Grid in 2011 - a year that included The Artist, Drive and a wave of controversy from Lars Von Trier.

In annual tradition, Screen’s illustrious jury of international critics delivered their verdict on the films in Competition at Cannes 2011 - the year that the Palme d’Or went to Terrence Malick for his experimental drama The Tree of Life.

The film marked the elusive Us auteur’s first return to the festival since winning best director for Days of Heaven in 1978.

But Screen’s jury was not as impressed. While The Tree of Life scored a respectable 2.8 out of 4, top marks went to atmospheric Turkish crime drama Once Upon a Time in Anatolia by Nuri Bilge Ceylan, with a score of 3.3.

The film was Ceylan’s fourth in Competition at Cannes, and tied for the Grand Jury Prize with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s [link »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 38 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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