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Hollywood Mouth (2008) Poster

Trivia

The Alto Nido apartment building in Hollywood, where the Faberge egg may be hidden, means "high nest" in Spanish. In Sunset Boulevard (1950) Joe Gillis (William Holden) lives at the Alto Nido at the beginning of the film.
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Berlyn's costume for the exteriors is a female version of Steve McQueen's in The Blob (1958) and her sunglasses are a tribute to Gene Tierney in Leave Her to Heaven (1945), Joan Crawford in The Damned Don't Cry (1950), and Simone Signoret in Diabolique (1955).
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The Bette Davis portrait from the '30s that accompanies the line "Eve studying Margo" is unusual because it was signed by Davis years later, c. 1980 (she liked to use a red or black Flair pen to sign her name around that time).
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The Lana Turner house shown in the film is where Turner's boyfriend, mob-connected Johnny Stompanato, was killed in her bedroom (second floor, far left) in 1958. Laura Hope Crews was the original owner of the house (1936).
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In the celebrity homes sequence, the room where Bugsy Siegel was murdered (1947) is in the round turret. He was reading the newspaper at 10:30 PM. It was said to be a mob hit for financial losses incurred with the Flamingo Hotel.
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The Lucille Ball/Desi Arnaz residence was purchased for $85,000 in 1955. Lucy didn't like people to use the front door; she preferred the door on the right side of the house. Lucy kept the house after divorcing Desi.
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Ingrid Bergman, John F. Kennedy, and John Lennon were some of the other guests at the Beverly Hills Hotel (nicknamed "The Pink Palace"). Katharine Hepburn used the tennis court here and Joan Crawford learned to swim in the pool.
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Sunset Tower appeared in Murder, My Sweet (1944) with Dick Powell. Other residents of the building were Paulette Goddard, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Bugsy Siegel, and songwriter Sammy Cahn ("All the Way").
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Additional residents of the Chateau Marmont were Jean Harlow, Hedy Lamarr, Grace Kelly, Myrna Loy, Robert Mitchum, Eartha Kitt, and Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward.
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Berlyn's costume for the interiors pays homage to Yul Brynner in The Magnificent Seven (1960) and Joan Crawford in Johnny Guitar (1954). The interior staircase alludes to a similar one in All About Eve (1950).
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Berlyn's last name, Ferlinghetti, refers to Lawrence Ferlinghetti, a guru (as publisher and mentor to Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg) of the 1950s Beat movement and owner of the City Lights bookstore in San Francisco, California.
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Pauline Kael, whose book "5001 Nights at the Movies" appears in the film (on Berlyn's coffee table), worked at City Lights bookstore when beginning her career as a movie critic.
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Phillip Van Winkle, who portrays the subject of the life-casting process in the special effects workshop sequence, is an ordained minister who formerly worked in the animation field.
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The "head" on the table that Berlyn touches at the beginning of the F/X studio scene, is a copy of a life mask of Lon Chaney that was made for "A Tribute to Lon Chaney" at Universal Studios. Chaney was a F/X makeup pioneer.
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The picture of W.C. Fields in the movie Poppy (1936) is a set from the now-closed Movieland Wax Museum; other wax museum sets in the film depict Rasputin and the Empress (1932), Top Hat (1935), an Our Gang comedy (The Awful Tooth (1938)), and The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939).
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The two "holes" in the door of the Barbara Stanwyck house had mirrors in them so guests could check their appearance. This was her final residence; she moved here in the late '60s.
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Frank Sinatra lived in the house shown in the film in the late 1940s. He moved out (to an apartment in the Sunset Tower) because of his affair with Ava Gardner.
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Marlene Dietrich lived in the Art Deco house in the early '30s. In the driveway would have been her cars of the time, a 1931 Rolls Royce or a 1932 Cadillac (chauffeur-driven; Dietrich claimed to drive but actually did not).
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Paul Newman became tired of fans ringing the doorbell of the house shown in the film (and asking to see his blue eyes). He had a sign put up on the lawn that read "They have moved."
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The Gary Cooper house was his first residence in Hollywood (mid-1920s). The house belonged to his parents. Because he could ride horses, Cooper started getting work as an extra in Westerns at this time.
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The front lawn of the Marilyn Monroe Elizabethan cottage was the site of the famous 1954 press conference when Marilyn, accompanied by her lawyer Jerry Giesler, announced she was divorcing Joe DiMaggio.
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Agnes Moorehead called her house Villa Agnese ("Agnes" in Italian). A former educator, with a M.A. in English and public speaking, she gave acting lessons in this Beverly Hills home.
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The Ingrid Bergman house in the film was her first in Hollywood (1939). Her boss, David O. Selznick, rented it for her. Later she moved to a larger residence in Benedict Canyon.
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The Natalie Wood/Robert Wagner house in the film was where Natalie Wood was living at the time of her death. Previous residents were singers Peggy Lee and Patti Page.
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Errol Flynn and David Niven lived in the Tudor-style house from 1938-1940. The Sunday afternoon parties at this house were part of Hollywood legend.
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Jean Harlow was living in the house shown in the movie when she died in 1937. She had moved here the year before.
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The Peter Lorre residence is on Hollywood Boulevard, west of the "entertainment district." Lorre had an apartment in this building in the 1960s.
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Ruth Chatterton entertained visiting New York stage stars in this Beverly Hills home. She had been on stage from age 12 and was a star of the early Talkies (in her spare time at Paramount she gave diction lessons to Clara Bow).
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The Faberge exhibit in Las Vegas referred to in the film was at the Bellagio Gallery (objects on loan from the Kremlin Museum and the Russian Ministry of Culture).
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The movie shown on the vintage television set is The Rose Tattoo (1955) with Anna Magnani and Burt Lancaster.
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Other patrons of Bullock's Wilshire ("where all the stars shopped") were Mae West, William Randolph Hearst (who shopped after the store closed), Cary Grant, Clark Gable, and John Wayne.
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The paper doll from Rick's collection is Simone Signoret; her black dress is from Diabolique (1955) and her fringed gown is from Ship of Fools (1965). The artist is Tom Tierney, who created many movie-related paper doll books.
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The "Mr. Pratt" referred to is Boris Karloff, his real name. This is based on an incident when a guest at a museum where the director was a guide spoke of Karloff by that name.
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Shirley MacLaine is shown next to Shirley Temple in the montage because she was named after the 1930s child star.
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Others who attended Hollywood High School were: Fay Wray, director Edward Dmytryk, Jason Robards, Julie London, Rick Nelson, Stefanie Powers, Mike Farrell, and John Ritter.
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Max Factor made hairpieces for Frank Sinatra, John Wayne and Fred Astaire in the building shown in the film. He was the inventor of pancake makeup, lip gloss, and false eyelashes.
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The Knickerbocker Hotel (and Apartments) opened in 1925. Other residents included Gloria Swanson, Norma Shearer, Dick Powell, Betty Grable, and William Frawley. Elvis Presley's parents stayed here when visiting Hollywood.
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Greta Garbo was a regular at the restaurant in the Hollywood Plaza Hotel, the Russian Eagle. Clara Bow's "It" Cafe opened here in 1937. Frank Sinatra stayed at the hotel the first time he came to Hollywood in 1940 with the Tommy Dorsey & His Orchestra.
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The Capitol Records building, designed to look like a stack of records, opened in 1956. Peggy Lee, Billie Holiday, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, the Kingston Trio, and the Beach Boys were other Capitol recording artists.
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The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences had its office in the Taft Building from 1935-1945. The Hays Office was the movies' censorship bureau. Many agents, e.g. Charles K. Feldman, had offices here (as did Willie Bioff of the mob).
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Others who did their drinking at Boardner's were Wallace Beery, Pat O'Brien, Mickey Cohen, Joe DiMaggio, the Black Dahlia, Nick Adams, director Edward D. Wood Jr., and writer Charles Bukowski.
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Loretta Young ate at the Pig 'n' Whistle every Sunday; Barbara Stanwyck several times a week. Other patrons were Judy Garland, Howard Hughes, Clark Gable, Walter Pidgeon, and Jane Wyman.
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The Fontenoy apartment building dates from 1927 and was named after a victorious battle during the reign of Louis XV. Later residents were Johnny Depp and Nicolas Cage.
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The Chateau Elysee was one of the Clark Gable/Carole Lombard "lovenests." Elizabeth Taylor's father had an art gallery here. Other residents were Mary Pickford, Lillian Gish, and Joan Bennett. (Stars such as Edward G. Robinson, Humphrey Bogart, and Ginger Rogers lived here early in their careers.)
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Many big bands of the 1940s played the Palladium. In the '60s and '70s the Lawrence Welk show was taped here (for 15 years); also a venue for the Golden Globes, Grammys, and Emmys.
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The picture accompanying the line "What about a pool" depicts Johnny Weissmuller, who before he played Tarzan was an Olympic swimming champion.
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The American title of the French poster with Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall is To Have and Have Not (1944).
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The 1903 house with a turret on Hollywood Boulevard is the Janes House (the oldest structure still remaining on the boulevard), once a school attended by Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and the Chaplin, Ince, Lasky, and De Mille children.
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Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy are depicted on one of the roll-down corrugated steel security doors on Hollywood Boulevard. Others to have portraits on these doors include James Cagney, Orson Welles, Frank Sinatra, Marlene Dietrich, and Alfred Hitchcock.
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The Hollywood Library is officially known as the Frances Goldwyn Library. The building was designed by Frank Gehry, architect of Disney Concert Hall, and replaced the earlier Hollywood library which was damaged in a fire in 1982.
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The Montecito (built 1931) appears in Raymond Chandler's "The Little Sister" as Chateau Bercy. It was a favorite residence for visiting New York actors, including Montgomery Clift, Geraldine Page, Rip Torn, George C. Scott, Lee Grant, Julie Harris, Gene Hackman, and Eli Wallach.
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The Hillview Apartments (the pink building where Laurel and Hardy lived) was built in 1916 as a residence for actors. Charles Chaplin once owned the building. Mae West stayed here when she was on tour with "Diamond Lil" in the '20s. The building was damaged in the 1994 earthquake and was rebuilt.
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Marilyn Monroe's first job as a model was posing on the diving board of the pool of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel (built 1927). Bette Davis's first husband Ham Nelson was the orchestra leader at the Blossom Room ballroom here.
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The Oban (the blue twin-gabled building near the beginning of the film) is now known as the Hollywood Guest Inn. Musicians from the big bands of the '40s (e.g. Glenn Miller and Harry James) stayed here when they were playing at the Palladium.
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The "Wally" in the autographed sepia photograph is Wallace Reid, popular star of silent movies. He died in 1923 from drug addiction (one of the first Hollywood scandals).
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The pan after Rick's quiz was filmed from the fourth floor east viewing deck of Hollywood & Highland. Note the Montecito and Fontenoy buildings; also the mural with Elvis, Marilyn, Chaplin, and John Wayne on the back of the Wax Museum building.
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The Hollywoodland sign dates from 1923, when it was put up to advertise a real estate development of that name. The "land" was removed in 1949. The picture in the film dates from about 1925.
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The toy the baby is holding at Rick's house is the Moe Howard key chain depicted in the insert in this segment.
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The Equitable Building (1929) was originally known as the Pantages Building (it's to the west of the theater of that name). Songwriter Irving Berlin ("White Christmas," "Top Hat, White Tie, and Tails," "Cheek to Cheek") had an office in the building.
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The fluorescent pink roses in the film are a variety named Esprit. The director originally envisioned a more pastel shade of pink, but these were the only pink roses available the night before filming began.
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Before opening as the Hollywood Paramount movie theater in 1941, the El Capitan was a live stage venue. Will Rogers, Rita Hayworth, Desi Arnaz, and Clark Gable appeared in shows there. Barker Brothers, where many stars bought their furniture, shared the building.
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Additional patrons of Musso & Frank restaurant were: Rudolph Valentino, Edward G. Robinson, Jean Harlow, Claudette Colbert, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Lana Turner, Joan Fontaine, Greta Garbo, John Huston, and the Rolling Stones. Known for having the best martini.
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Rene Daumal, quoted near the end of the film, was described by Simone de Beauvoir in "Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter" as a writer in avant-garde magazines..."said to be a deep thinker."
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That's a real piranha head on the coffee table in the movie. Piranhas are no longer allowed to be imported into the United States.
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The text in the Simone de Beauvoir segment is derived from the play "Two Simones: de Beauvoir and Signoret in Hollywood."
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The street in the Simone de Beauvoir segment is McCadden Place in central Hollywood, between Hollywood Boulevard and Yucca Street.
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Bette Davis's line about George Cukor alludes to Cukor's reputation as a "women's director." In their pre-Hollywood days when both of them worked for a stock company in Rochester, New York, Cukor fired Davis from her job (although Cukor later denied this).
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The street with the Washingtonia palms along it that introduces the stars' homes segment is the residential part of Hollywood Boulevard. The street sign for the cross street, Fuller Avenue, is visible on the right.
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John Wayne, John F. Kennedy, and Montgomery Clift were other patrons of Miceli's restaurant on Las Palmas Avenue in Hollywood. Elvis Presley was a guest when he first came to Hollywood in 1956.
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The "shrunken head" on the coffee table is a reproduction of the novelty item from the 1950s and '60s that was a popular prize at carnivals during that era.
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Those are cartridge calligraphy pens on the coffee table. A few examples of Berlyn's calligraphy will appear in the film.
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The Pantages Theatre, which opened in 1930, was the venue for the Academy Awards from 1950 through 1960. Some of the stars who received Oscars there were Humphrey Bogart, Frank Sinatra, Grace Kelly, Marlon Brando, Susan Hayward, Simone Signoret, Ernest Borgnine, Jack Lemmon, and Olivia de Havilland.
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The walkway in the back part of the Hollywood & Highland complex (shown in the montage) is known as Actors' Alley. The original building on this site was the Hollywood Hotel (1903-1956). Silent star Alla Nazimova, Rudolph Valentino, Greta Garbo, and author W. Somerset Maugham were among its guests.
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The Warner Pacific Theatre (opened in 1928) was the first movie theater on the west coast wired for sound. As a teenager, Carol Burnett worked as an usher here (she lived around the corner). She was fired for telling some patrons they should wait and see the movie from the beginning. Her Walk of Fame star is in front of the building.
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The Egyptian Theatre opened with Robin Hood (1922) starring Douglas Fairbanks. The design of the building was inspired by the discovery of King Tut's tomb. James Dean's breakthrough movie East of Eden (1955) played here. The building sustained extensive damage in the 1994 Northridge earthquake and had to be rebuilt.
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John Wayne lived in the apartment building shown in the film in the 1930s. Built in 1925, it was also the "lovenest" of Gloria Swanson and Joseph Kennedy.
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Another resident of the Lido Apartments was Percy Kilbride, star of the "Ma and Pa Kettle" movies (1949-55).
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Hedy Lamarr lived in the house shown in the film in the late 1940s. At that time, the house was painted white.
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Grace Kelly usually shared apartments with roommates or her sister. She never owned a home in Hollywood. She lived in the apartment complex in the stars' homes sequence in 1954.
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George Arliss recognized Bette Davis's abilities and gave her an important part in The Man Who Played God (1932) which resulted in her Warner Brothers contract. The poster in the film depicts him in his Academy Award-winning role as British Prime Minister Disraeli.
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Winner of awards from the Indie Fest, the Los Angeles Movie Awards, the Los Angeles Cinema Festival of Hollywood, the Accolade Competition, the Los Angeles Film and Script Festival, and the Nevada Film Festival.
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Special screening, Old Towne Orange, Orange, California, July 27, 2012.
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Adolphe Menjou was another star who lived at the Villa Carlotta apartments.
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The Los Angeles office of Photoplay magazine, the most popular movie magazine of Golden Age Hollywood, was located in the Taft Building at Hollywood and Vine.
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Patrons of the New Yorker nightclub in the Hotel Christie included Gloria Swanson and Marlene Dietrich and her husband Rudolf Sieber.
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Myron Selznick, the agent who was responsible for Vivien Leigh being cast in Gone with the Wind (1939), had an office in the Equitable Building. Some of his other clients were Laurence Olivier, Alfred Hitchcock, Carole Lombard, William Powell, Rosalind Russell, George Cukor, and W.C. Fields.
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Edward G. Robinson and David O. Selznick were additional residents of the Villa Carlotta apartments, which date from 1926.
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Bob Dylan was another celebrity who stayed at the Montecito Hotel in Hollywood.
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Author Louis L'Amour and Claire Bloom were additional residents of the Andalusia apartments (the Spanish-style building with green and white tiles along the front).
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Bela Lugosi lived in the house shown in the movie during the filming of Dracula (1931).
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The Cinegrill was the restaurant in the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel (it was also a nightclub/cabaret venue). Patrons included Frank Capra, Joan Blondell, Dick Powell, W.C. Fields, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Barbara Stanwyck, Humphrey Bogart, Joan Crawford, Gary Cooper, and Errol Flynn. Marilyn Monroe was a regular, preferring the darkest corner booth.
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Marlene Dietrich stayed at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel when performing her solo shows at the Ahmanson Theatre in 1968 and the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in 1974.
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The Hotel Christie on Hollywood Blvd. opened in 1922 as Hollywood's first luxury hotel. It was renamed the Drake Hotel in 1945 and later became the Hollywood Inn.
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The Palace Theater on Vine Street (originally the Hollywood Playhouse) became a nightclub, the Avalon, in 2003.
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James Dean, Natalie Wood, Nick Adams, Jim Backus, and other members of the cast of Rebel Without a Cause (1955) rehearsed the script in Nicholas Ray's bungalow at the Chateau Marmont.
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Others who attended Hollywood High School were Fay Wray, Lon Chaney Jr., Richard Long, Jill St. John, and Cher.
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Other guests at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel have included Warren Beatty, Tony Bennett, John Lennon, and Mick Jagger.
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The two radio towers on the roof of the Warner Hollywood Theatre (later the Hollywood Pacific Theatre) were installed for radio station KFWB, which was owned by Warner Brothers.
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The Vine Street Theater opened in 1927 as a live theater venue. In 1931 it became the Mirror Theater, a movie theater owned by Howard Hughes, then the Studio Theatre, which also showed movies. From 1936 until 1953 it was CBS Radio Playhouse. From 1954 to 1985 the building was the Huntington Hartford Theater, then the James Doolittle Theater, and in 2003 became the Ricardo Montalban Theater.
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Additional patrons of Boardner's bar (which opened in 1942) were W.C. Fields, Lawrence Tierney, Peggy Lee, and Tom Hatten.
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Other television shows broadcast from the Palace Theater were The Colgate Comedy Hour (1950), The Jerry Lewis Show (1957), and The Hollywood Palace (1964). The Palace later became a live music venue for groups such as Romeo Void, the English Beat, Berlin, Nirvana, INXS, the Ramones, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Midnight Oil, and No Doubt.
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Sam Bologna as Sal Getty and Jordan Mohr as Berlyn reprise their roles in Hollywood Mouth 2 (2014).
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Additional residents of Sunset Tower were Howard Hughes, Errol Flynn, Marilyn Monroe, Truman Capote, George Stevens, Michael Caine, and Roger Moore.
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Others who attended Hollywood High School were animator Chuck Jones, Ann Miller, Marcel Ophüls, Keith Carradine, Robert Carradine, Laurence Fishburne, and Brandy Norwood.
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Others who shopped at Bullocks Wilshire department store (opened in 1929, closed in 1993) were Shirley Temple, Gloria Swanson, Walt Disney, Marion Davies, Alfred Hitchcock, and Katharine Hepburn. Angela Lansbury, Esther Williams, and June Lockhart worked there as salesclerks when they were teenagers.
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Rita Hayworth and Prince Aly Khan were later residents of the Marlene Dietrich house shown in the film.
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Additional residents of Sunset Tower were Harpo Marx, Greta Garbo, Charles Laughton and Elsa Lanchester, and Marilyn Monroe.
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Sunset Tower appears in Raymond Chandler's book "Farewell, My Lovely."
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The 1700 block of McCadden Place between Hollywood Boulevard and Yucca Street has changed significantly since the Simone de Beauvoir segment was filmed there. Berlyn is shown walking on the west side of McCadden (near Yucca) because that was where the famous Don the Beachcomber restaurant was located. (Simone de Beauvoir was taken to the Beachcomber when she visited L.A. in 1947, and this is referred to in the segment.) At the time the movie was made, a large parking lot covered the former Don the Beachcomber site; this area was later filled in with apartments.
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Don the Beachcomber restaurant opened in 1937 and closed in 1985. Joan Crawford's favorite restaurant; other patrons included Bing Crosby, Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Franchot Tone, Howard Hughes, Orson Welles, Mickey Rooney, Ava Gardner, Frank Sinatra, Ingrid Bergman, Lucille Ball, Greer Garson, Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor, Eddie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, and George Reeves. Known for their powerful rum drink the Zombie ("limit of 2") and for using the best-quality shrimp available (for their "Fried Shrimp," "Shrimp Vegetable," and "Shrimp Chow Dun"). L.A.'s first Polynesian restaurant.
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A 1940s menu from Don the Beachcomber restaurant appears in the movie.
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Simone de Beauvoir said of Don the Beachcomber restaurant in Hollywood: "The French consul invited me to dinner. I have never seen such an enchanting restaurant." And de Beauvoir described Hollywood as "the most sophisticated city in the world, surrounded by wild-looking mountains." (Her visit was in 1947.)
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The Pantages Theatre opened in 1930. Some of the movies that played here were The Pride of the Yankees (1942), A Star Is Born (1954), Spartacus (1960), Cleopatra (1963), Patton (1970), and Lady Sings the Blues (1972). In 1977 it closed as a movie theater and became a live theater venue.
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The Cinerama Dome Theater opened in 1963 with It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963). Other movies shown here were The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), Camelot (1967), Ice Station Zebra (1968), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), Apocalypse Now (1979), and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982). In 2002 it became the ArcLight movie theater complex.
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Nathanael West moved into the Parva-Sed-Apta Apartments (Latin for "small but enough") in the summer of 1935. West used the building for Tod Hackett's residence in the novel he was writing at the time, "The Day of the Locust."
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The Hollywood Studio Club was operated by the YWCA as a residence for women in the motion picture business. It opened in 1926 and was designed by Julia Morgan, who was the architect of Hearst Castle; it closed in 1975. In addition to Marilyn Monroe, Kim Novak, Dorothy Malone, and Donna Reed, some of the other actresses who lived here were Maureen O'Sullivan, Evelyn Keyes, Marie Windsor, Barbara Eden, and Sharon Tate.
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The Hollywood Athletic Club on Sunset Blvd. was built in 1924 and stayed in business as a health club through the 1950s. Members included Charles Chaplin, Rudolph Valentino, Cecil B. DeMille, Mary Pickford, Jean Harlow, Joan Crawford, Bela Lugosi, Clark Gable, John Barrymore, Johnny Weissmuller, John Ford, John Wayne, Errol Flynn, Humphrey Bogart, Robert Taylor, William Holden, Tyrone Power, and Walt Disney. The tower contained hotel rooms that members could use. An Olympic-size swimming pool, gymnasium, running track, sauna, restaurant, barbershop, and lounge were on the premises.
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In 1978 the Hollywood Athletic Club was renovated and became an entertainment complex with event space, restaurants, offices, and recording studios (Joe Strummer of the Clash and the Beach Boys have recorded there).
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Lux Radio Theatre was a weekly radio program (1936-1953) broadcast from CBS Radio Playhouse on Vine Street. One-hour adaptations of movies were performed before a studio audience. Lux Radio Theatre was the most popular drama series on radio. The first movie adaptation was "The Legionnaire and the Lady," which was based on Morocco (1930), starring Marlene Dietrich and Clark Gable. Sometimes the plays were performed by the stars of the movie version--e.g. "The Thin Man" with William Powell and Myrna Loy, "Stella Dallas" with Barbara Stanwyck and John Boles, "It Happened One Night" with Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert, "The Letter" with Bette Davis and Herbert Marshall, "Algiers" with Charles Boyer and Hedy Lamarr, and "The Philadelphia Story" with Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant. Other times at least one of the leads differed from the original cast of the movie--e.g. "Alice Adams" with Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray, "Anna Christie" with Joan Crawford and Spencer Tracy, "Dark Victory" with Barbara Stanwyck and Melvyn Douglas, "Theodora Goes Wild" with Irene Dunne and Cary Grant, "Stage Door" with Ginger Rogers and Rosalind Russell, "The Awful Truth" with Cary Grant and Claudette Colbert, "My Favorite Wife" with Laurence Olivier and Rosalind Russell, and "They Drive by Night" with George Raft and Lana Turner. Cecil B. DeMille was the host of the program from 1936 until 1945.
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Crawford Glen is a real street in Orange County, California (located near South Coast Plaza mall).
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Robert Young lived in the house in the film (located in Beverly Hills) from the 1950s until 1974, when he moved to Westlake Village.
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Ray Milland was the original owner of the Tudor-style house in the stars' homes segment; it was built in 1939.
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Henry Fonda lived in the apartment building in Beverly Hills in the mid-1930s.
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Leslie Howard moved into the house in the film in 1939, the year he appeared in Gone with the Wind (1939). Hedy Lamarr was the previous owner of this home.
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Oliver Hardy lived in the Spanish-style house from the early 1930s until the 1940s, when he moved to the San Fernando Valley.
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Stan Laurel lived in the English manor-style house (located in Beverly Hills) in the 1930s. Like Oliver Hardy, he later moved to the San Fernando Valley.
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Oliver Hardy lived at the Knickerbocker Hotel in Hollywood in the 1920s, and Stan Laurel stayed at the Knickerbocker during his separations and divorces (Laurel was married five times).
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Boris Karloff lived in the house in the film in the 1930s and 1940s.
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Ray Milland and Leslie Howard were additional residents of Sunset Tower apartments.
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Other residents of the Chateau Elysee apartments (built in 1927 in the style of a French castle) were Bette Davis, Spencer Tracy, Lillian Gish, Errol Flynn, and George Burns and Gracie Allen.
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Bette Davis's ceremony for her hand and footprints at Grauman's Chinese Theater took place the day after the premiere of All About Eve (1950) at that theater. The night of the premiere the Roosevelt Hotel across the street darkened all the letters except "eve" in its neon sign.
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Elvis Presley lived in Suite 850 at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel between 1958 and 1960.
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Ann Miller purchased the house in the film in the 1950s.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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