Hollywood (1980– )
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Single Beds and Double Standards 

Mounting scandals including drug addiction and murder force the studios to appoint Will Hays as a morals czar to oversee production.
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
...
Himself - Narrator (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Cedric Belfrage ...
Himself
Karl Brown ...
Himself
...
Herself
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
Anita Loos ...
Herself
...
Himself
Samuel Marx ...
Himself (as Sam Marx)
...
Herself
Albert S. Rogell ...
Himself (as Al Rogell)
Bob Rose ...
Himself
...
Herself
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Storyline

Mounting scandals including Wallace Reid's death from drug addiction, the unsolved murder of director William Desmond Taylor,and the two sensational murder/rape trials of comedian Fatty Arbuckle with the resultant outcry force the studios to appoint Will Hays as a morals czar to oversee production. Written by duke1029@aol.com

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22 January 1980 (UK)  »

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Features The Life of the Party (1920) See more »

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Fantastic
11 October 2014 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

This episode is about the hypocrisy that was invading Hollywood in their efforts to manage public perceptions. In other words, what actors REALLY did was far, far less important than what people THINK they did! So, if the media crucifies Fatty Arbuckle (which is examined in depth in this show), then Hollywood follows suit. If, on the other hand, it can be swept under the rug (such as with William Desmond Taylor and Wallace Reid), ALL THE BETTER!! A great example was the appointing of Will Hays to represent the new censorship arm in Hollywood--a job that actually had little in the way of actual enforcement and soon gave way to the so- called 'Pre-Code Era'--the bawdy and amoral period in Hollywood in which practically ANYTHING might be in the plots of their films! Well done, though I wish the film had been a bit more clear about the lack of enforcement--though I can understand why they didn't explore this further, as it really got MUCH worse during the early talking picture days and the show is about the silents. Well worth seeing because it was made so well, so exactingly and so thoroughly.

NOTE: There is a fair amount of nudity in this one, as it talks about underground/stag films as well. Just giving you a heads up!


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