Contrary to popular belief, the silent film in general had reached a high state of sophistication by the late 1920s.
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode credited cast:
...
Himself - Narrator (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Himself (archive footage)
Karl Brown ...
Himself
Gaylord Carter ...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Herself
...
Himself
...
Herself
...
Himself
A. Arnold Gillespie ...
Himself
...
Actress in 'Julia of Bethulia' (archive footage)
...
Herself
Chauncey Haines ...
Himself
...
Himself
Anita Loos ...
Herself
Edit

Storyline

The opening episode of this epic, landmark series belies the commonly held misconception that silent films are crudely-made historical curiosities but a vibrant art form that had reached a high degree of sophistication by the late 1920s. Film clips from silent classics as well as interviews with surviving silent stars and filmmakers are featured. Written by duke1029@aol.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

8 January 1980 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?


Connections

Features Les amours de la reine Élisabeth (1912) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Probably my least favorite episode of a brilliant series.
11 October 2014 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

This episode begins with Al Jolson and "The Jazz Singer" and works its way backward in American silent films. I didn't mind this style of doing this, though I was surprised how little attention was actually given to the earliest American films. They were VERY quickly mentioned, as if in passing--so you get almost nothing about the early Edison films as well as many of the other early filmmakers. To me, this is a mistake and the show should have talked MUCH more about these pre-Hollywood American films. After all, American silents did NOT begin in Hollywood and episodes 1 and 2 make you almost think that--or that very, very, very few films were made before filmmakers moved to California. This is NOT the case.

Now that I've completed my rant, I will say that I still thoroughly enjoyed this first episode. Like the rest of the series, I was impressed by the number of clips, interviews and information. Plus, I did appreciate how it talked about the impact of "Birth of Nation" while NOT downplaying what a racist film it was! Well worth seeing-- and the series only gets better!


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?