Screenwriters Neil Gaiman and Roger Avery discuss how they put back all the stuff the monks 'censored' when they put the first known story to paper in the English language: the poem of Beowulf.
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

Screenwriters Neil Gaiman and Roger Avery discuss how they put back all the stuff the monks 'censored' when they put the first known story to paper in the English language: the poem of Beowulf.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary | Short

Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

26 February 2008 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

This documentary is featured on the directors cut DVD release of _Beowulf (2007)_ (qv See more »

Connections

References Beowulf (2007) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Shaping a story over time
12 February 2010 | by (Denmark) – See all my reviews

This is the second-to-shortest featurette on the 2-Disc Director's Cut DVD of Beowulf, with a running time of 5 minutes. It consists of interviews, clips of the film and concept artwork. They go over the evolution of the legend, and how old it actually is. This should definitely not be watched by anyone who has not already seen the movie itself, as it spoils numerous plot twists, as well as potentially the very ending. It is very interesting to hear about the origins... this is literally the first bit of fiction that we know to be written down, as it took over from the tradition of orally spreading the word. The fact that it has always been altered based upon who was telling it is pointed out, and I do kinda more or less agree with the supposition that it makes this simply be the next in line, as they also changed it for this, as you probably already know. Let's face it, it was never that compelling of a credible source of history. This is well-edited and the pace is smooth. It is not boring for a second, if you are one of us who wish to find out about the subject. I recommend this to anyone who belongs in this group. 7/10


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page