5.6/10
17
3 user

Henry Santry and His Soldiers of Fortune (1930)

Henry Santry's band is comprised of self-proclaimed soldiers of fortune. Within their concert set includes the opening declaration of them being soldiers of fortune, Henry serenading a ... See full summary »

Director:

(uncredited)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Henry Santry ...
Himself - Bandleader
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Storyline

Henry Santry's band is comprised of self-proclaimed soldiers of fortune. Within their concert set includes the opening declaration of them being soldiers of fortune, Henry serenading a dancing girl he who wants a girl like her, Private Bell looking for a girl he could love tonight, a nimble female dancer performing a comic routine, and a friendly battle between the various instruments in the band. Written by Huggo

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Genres:

Short | Music

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Details

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Release Date:

September 1930 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Vitaphone)

Aspect Ratio:

1.20 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reel #1128. See more »

Soundtracks

Soldiers of Fortune
(uncredited)
Composer undetermined
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User Reviews

 
Worth seeing just to watch the lady dance.
31 January 2012 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

This Vitaphone musical short features Henry Santry and his band--all dressed up like WWI soldiers in a set that I assume is supposed to be a French village. Aside from the strange setting, this is a pretty typical sort of film for the studio--with the band performing a few songs and various singers singing. However, the third act is a bizarre one. Instead of a featured singer, there is a weird SUPER-ambidextrous lady who dances one of the strangest dances I've seen--and her odd gesticulating is reason enough to watch this one. None of the music is particularly good (particularly when the man sings "If I Could Be With You", as his voice was very thin) but it was interesting seeing a harpist and two steel guitar players in the band and the weird dancer. Not great but worth seeing as a window into the past.


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