Tamara Drewe (2010) - News Poster

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IFC Buys Gemma Arterton Drama ‘The Escape’ (Exclusive)

IFC Buys Gemma Arterton Drama ‘The Escape’ (Exclusive)
IFC Films has nabbed U.S. and Canadian rights to “The Escape,” a character study that features a bravura turn by Gemma Arterton as an unhappy wife and mother. The film, which was written and directed by Dominic Savage (“Love + Hate”) and co-stars Dominic Cooper (“The History Boys”), premiered at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival.

It earned strong reviews at the Canadian festival, with Variety’s Guy Lodge praising the lead performance, and writing that “‘The Escape’ works as an unsparing showcase for Arterton’s growing range and maturity as an actress.” Arterton has previously starred in “Clash of the Titans,” “Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters,” and “Tamara Drewe.”

The Escape” centers on Tara, a woman who loves her family, but feels trapped and unfulfilled by her life in a housing estate. She runs away after failing to receive an empathetic response to her frustrations from friends and loved ones. Tara goes on a journey of self-discovery, one that
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The End Of The F***ing World review: dark, funny & fearless

Louisa Mellor Oct 24, 2017

Channel 4’s new 8-part comic book adaptation is an all-round winner. Great writing, top performances, well-paced and stylish…

Contains plot references to episode 1, but no spoilers.

See related The quiet brilliance of Mackenzie Crook's Detectorists Mackenzie Crook interview: Game Of Thrones, Detectorists, Pirates 5

Between its punk title and an opening few minutes that reference child self-mutilation, animal killing, psychopathy and murder, The End Of The F***ing World starts off by weeding out the weak. Meet teenagers James and Alyssa, it says, he’s a monster and she’s angry. You won’t like them.

You will though, you’ll even come to love them. Just as the spikiest people can be the most vulnerable, this show’s aggressive nihilism conceals a tender and romantic centre. Its eight episodes are essentially the story of two young people damaged by abandonment who find temporary solace in each other.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Dominic Cooper: ‘My best kiss? James Corden’

The actor on narcissism, roaming the moors with Kate Bush, and his love of classic cars

Born in London, Dominic Cooper, 39, trained at Lamda. In 2004 he played Dakin in Alan Bennett’s The History Boys at the National Theatre and on Broadway; he went on to appear in the 2006 film adaptation. His subsequent movies include Mamma Mia!, An Education, Tamara Drewe and My Week With Marilyn. On television, he has appeared in Fleming, Agent Carter and, most recently, the AMC series Preacher, in which he stars with his partner Ruth Negga. Stratton, his latest film, is released on 1 September.

When were you happiest?

I am pretty chirpy at the moment.

Related: Martin Sheen: ‘Which living person do I most despise? Yellow Hair'

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Win Their Finest on Blu-ray

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Competitions

To mark the release of Their Finest on 21st August, we’ve been given 3 copies to give away on Blu-ray.

1940, London, the Blitz. With the country’s morale at stake, inexperienced screenwriter, Catrin (Gemma Arterton; The Girl With All The Gifts, Tamara Drewe) and a makeshift cast and crew work under fire to make a film to lift the country’s flagging spirits and inspire America to join the war. Partnered with fellow screenwriter, Buckley (Sam Claflin; My Cousin Rachel, Me Before You), the pair set off to make a film that will warm the hearts of the nation whilst navigating the constant threat of The Blitz, limited resources and the demands of gloriously egotistical actor, Ambrose Hilliard (Bill Nighy; The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, Love, Actually).

Please note: This competition is open to UK residents only

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The Small Print

Open to UK residents only
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘Their Finest’ UK DVD and Blu-ray release details announced

The UK DVD and Blu-ray release of British film Their Finest has been announced.

Capturing and reflecting the spirit of a nation at war, one woman must navigate the complexities of movie production, the stiff upper lips of government and her own romantic entanglements in the irresistible British comedy drama Their Finest, available on digital platforms from August 14th and on Blu-ray and DVD from August 21st courtesy of Lionsgate Home Entertainment.

1940, London, the Blitz. With the country’s morale at stake, inexperienced screenwriter, Catrin (Gemma Arterton; The Girl With All The Gifts, Tamara Drewe) and a makeshift cast and crew work under fire to make a film to lift the country’s flagging spirits and inspire America to join the war. Partnered with fellow screenwriter, Buckley (Sam Claflin; My Cousin Rachel, Me Before You), the pair set off to make a film that will warm the hearts of the
See full article at The Hollywood News »

26 new UK TV shows to look out for

Louisa Mellor Jun 1, 2017

Some exciting new UK drama and comedy commissions are making their way to TV over the next year or so…

We know, we know. You still have two episodes of Fargo season two before you can think about starting season three. You’ve already fallen behind on American Gods. Your planner memory is chock-a-block with Big Little Lies and that Oj Simpson thing and some Spanish prison series your workmate bullied you into recording. You’re struggling to make time for Twin Peaks. New Game Of Thrones is just around the corner. And guess what, Netflix UK have just added a whole new season of It’s Always Sunny, those sods. You need a list of new TV show recommendations like you need a hole in the head.

See related Metroid: Other M Nintendo Wii review

And yet, as long as they keep making them, we’ll keep recommending them.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Gemma Arterton Talks Sexism and Likability in “Their Finest”

Their Finest

Their Finest” sees Gemma Arterton playing Catrin, a young woman hired to write lines for women in British war propaganda movies. It’s a movie within a movie dealing with gender roles in the ’40s that at times feels all-too-relevant to today. We talked to the British actress about starring in a female-led film, working with the film’s director, Lone Scherfig, and why she’s sick of hearing about likability.

Their Finest” opens in theaters April 7.

This interview has been edited. It was transcribed by Kelsey Moore.

W&H: I’ve been waiting to meet you for a while. We’ve given you the “Hollywood Feminist of the Day” mention at Women and Hollywood three times. You say many things that are meaningful to us.

So first, let’s talk a bit about the movie. What drew you to this role?

Ga: Well, when you’re making a female-centric movie, the female role is often kind of strong and feminist, or she knows what she wants. I don’t think that’s helpful, because I think that women are all sorts of people, and we just need to tell stories about women in general.

I read this role and thought, yes, she goes along and finds her voice and all of that. But, she starts off as someone who is quite accepting of her situation and of the sexism of that time. For instance, one of the first things that she’s told is, “We can’t pay you as much as the men,” and she just replies, “Oh, of course.”

So, it was really helpful that it was set in the forties where it was just the way it was. But, at the same time, what I liked about her was that she was able to be observant, timid, and a bit more gentle. She’s surrounded by all these really strong characters, which meant that she could be not that strong. I found that quite refreshing; it meant that I could play something different than the usual.

W&H: Do you think we’ve been stuck in a place where women have had to be a certain way because we haven’t had enough women-centric movies?

Ga: Yeah. Do you mean because we’re not being shown to [our] full extent?

W&H: Exactly. So, women have to be this, but men can be all of this.

Ga: Yeah, it’s like that thing which I hate: “likable.” Who gives a fuck about “likable?” Often women have to be likable.

I remember doing a movie years ago called “Tamara Drewe,” and she’s not a likable character — she cheats, she’s a homewrecker — and I thought, well, that’s okay. Then, I did another film [based on work] by the same author, Posy Simmonds, and I really like her as a writer because of how she writes these women.

Women like Jane Eyre aren’t likable, you know. I find that really frustrating. I think that, in literature, we’ve got so many different types of women who aren’t necessarily strong or likable. In film, I don’t know why — maybe it’s because people who finance films are certain types of people — women just can’t be women.

W&H: We really wonder why they think this is what the public wants.

Ga: Yeah. I think it’s a really exciting time now, and I can speak from my own experience. I’ve started producing all of the films that I have on this year’s slate. I’m developing and/or co-writing projects. I made a film last year that I produced and wrote. These aren’t likable characters — they’re just multifaceted women. Sometimes they’re likable, sometimes they’re not.

I think that’s what we need to do. We need to give space for telling stories about actual, real women. That’s what I liked about this film. Even though she’s gentle and sweet, she’s not your typical female character; there are flashes where she’s impetuous, stressed out, or even pissy. I liked the script because it was an ensemble cast and there was enough space for this kind of character.

W&H: Absolutely. Did you start producing on your own because you felt that the scripts you were getting weren’t up to the standards you were looking for?

Ga: Yeah. I’m very luck to be sent so much stuff, but it’s very rare that I get sent something that really excites me — something that I’m passionate about.

That’s why I started developing. I’ve come across things or I’ve been sent scripts that would be really difficult to make. My passion lies where I just have an idea or work with writers. Sometimes, my agents will show me something and will tell me, “This isn’t good enough for you,” and I know it. It’s really, really tricky.

W&H: If you get, say, ten scripts, how many of them do you think are even worthy of your read?

Ga: Well, I have amazing agents that read everything for me. They’ll only send me stuff that they think are worthy for my read. But even so, with those I’d say maybe one in ten.

W&H: Yeah — not surprised. So, tell me if I’m wrong, but it looks like you made some bigger movies in the beginning of your career and have since moved yourself into a place where it’s more independent. Does this have to do with what we’ve just been talking about — the idea of “this is not what I want my life to be?” The overt and covert sexism? How have you shaped your career and choices?

Ga: It’s kind of similar to what happens to my character Catrin in the film. I started off just feeling grateful and not really aware of the fact that I was a creative artist.

Even though I’d started acting a few years earlier and I had done all of this physical theater — which is about devising theater and coming up with all of these ideas — I was suddenly in this place where I thought, “Well, thank goodness I’m even being considered for this, and this is how you do it.” I lost touch with who I was in the sense that I stopped doing theater, which is where I can really express myself.

In a weird way, I look back on those films and am grateful for them because they showed me what I didn’t want to do. They actually gave me the impetus to start my own production company and look at things in a different way. That said, that early part of my career was peppered with really important work that was the “true me.”

Also, I really enjoy collaborating. I love working with other people, and I love discussing ideas. That why I love working with director Lone Scherfig and producers Stephen Woolley and Amanda Posey — they collaborate with their actors and writers, and everyone gets in the room together and talks. We talked with Lone and screenwriter Gaby Chiappe six months before we started shooting, and I was able to give opinions and rework some stuff.

That is the way I work. In the theater, that’s how you work: you’re part of a team. When it’s a huge machine, that’s really hard to do. There are so many other people, and so you’re not able to get in a room together. So for me, independent, smaller projects are the way to do it. I can’t work in any other way now.

W&H: It’s interesting because a lot of what Catrin goes through in the film is still relevant. It felt really contemporary.

Ga: I’m so pleased. Lone will be really pleased to hear you say that, because even though it’s a period piece, we wanted it to feel current. I think that’s all in the script — with what she’s going through, all this propaganda filmmaking, and there’s so much stuff that is relatable.

Catrin is progressive. I don’t think that Stephen Woolley, who is a massive feminist, would make the movie otherwise. It’s probably what drew him to the book in the first place — that it’s about film, but it’s also about a woman within the film industry and how that is.

Even today, I just played Saint Joan in Josie Rourke’s “Saint Joan,” and we decided that I would be the only woman in the production — even though we had a female director who is hot on gender balance, cross casting, and all of that. She said, “ I think it’s right that you’re the only woman, because to be the only woman in the room is really saying something.”

Even though Catrin wasn’t the only woman in the film — she has “fill” to back her up — in the writer’s room, she’s often on her own, and that’s how it was back then. My character is based on a real woman, Diana Morgan, who was a screenwriter for Ealing Studios. She was brought in to write the “nausea,” what we call “slop” in the movie — the women’s dialogue. That was a real thing. Then she became a successful writer. She was an excellent writer, but she had to write under a male pseudonym because they wouldn’t put a woman’s name on the movie poster unless you were an actress.

That was the 1940s, and things started to change in the ’60s, but…still.

W&H: I feel like people who know Hollywood will recognize a lot of the dialogue and many of the things that went on for Catrin as things that still go on today.

Ga: Yeah.

W&H: How do you feel about the fact that women in the USA and other places are now talking about equal pay for equal work? Do you have thoughts on that?

Ga: I think it’s excellent. I think that equal pay for equal work is how it should be. I’ve spoken about this before. It’s tricky in the film industry to quantify that though, because sometimes someone’s worth is more. If it’s equal work, it’s really difficult to quantify.

W&H: I mean, it’s all gendered. Men are given more clout because the world values men more. So, we’re never going to have the same amount of clout because it’s just the way it is. But, I find it interesting that now something has shifted where women feel that they won’t be blacklisted for speaking up.

Ga: Yes, now they can say it.

W&H: Do you remember when it happened? I do have a theory regarding when it shifted, when women felt safer to talk about these issues.

Ga: Well, obviously the Sony hack brought it into the light. Then, it became a big talking point, and this is the thing: just talking about it is really helpful.

I have a friend who’s a director, and she hates being constantly asked, “What is it like being a female director?” I know Lone is the same way. My friend will say, “I’m a director. Don’t talk to me about that, because actually what you’re doing is making a problem.” But actually, the solution — what we want to get to — is where you just call yourself a director, or an actor, or a writer. But we’re not there, so we need to talk about it, and we need to make a thing of it.

I feel like that’s what happened with the pay conversation. There was a moment in time where it all just kind of blew up, and it became this thing that everyone was talking about. Now, it’s given people the confidence to say, “What is my costar getting paid?”

In the workplace, I think it’s different. I think people still don’t have the confidence to ask what their coworkers are getting paid. But, it being spoken about makes people understand that they aren’t the only one feeling this, or that it’s not right.

W&H: It’s interesting. Women on red carpets and in other interviews are always asked if they’re feminist, but men are never asked any of those questions. Do you have any thoughts as to why we put women through that? What is it about our world that we need to test women if they’re feminists now? Shouldn’t we all be feminists?

Ga: We should all be feminists.

W&H: Do you get asked that a lot?

Ga: Well, everyone knows I’m a feminist, so they don’t ask me. I even used to have this necklace that was a big gold chain that said “feminist” on it. Everyone just knows it. They don’t ask me anymore. But, I kind of find it the most preposterous thing to be asked because I’m like, “Well, yeah.”

I think the word has different connotations in different cultures. I think it’s seen as a negative thing in a lot of cultures, as if you’re a man-hater. But it’s not.

For me, “feminist” means somebody that believes that men and women are equal, and because we’re not there yet, feminism is a movement to get there.

W&H: Yes. For me, my work has been about women and raising awareness about women, so I always ask about female directors. But when I started ten years ago, no one talked about this at all.

Ga: I know. It’s crazy. I think it’s amazing that it is such a talking point now and there are organizations like Women In Film.

W&H: And Women In Film have been around for 35 years.

Ga: But it’s really gotten credence now, and people are really taking this kind of thing seriously.

W&H: Do you think that this is a feminist film?

Ga: Yeah. It’s a film that points women in a good light and gives women the space to talk. And we pass the Bechdel test.

W&H: She fights to be equal.

Ga: She does, and she does it in a way that’s not a kind of “Made in Dagenham” way.

W&H: I love that movie.

Ga: I love that movie too — Stephen Woolley made it, and I did the musical version.

W&H: How was that?

Ga: It was fantastic and one of my proudest moments, doing that play. But, that’s a different thing. It’s a political film and it was about that specific movement.

With this, there’s so much going on, and I think that’s why Lone is such an incredible director. There’s so much going on, and all of these things just kind of happen. They’re not in your face — you can just let them sink in. It’s so fast-paced that there’ll be a sexist remark that makes you gasp, then you’re on to the next thing, and I think it just washes over you. I think that’s more powerful in these kind of movies than shouting about it.

Also, I would hate to call this a feminist movie if it stops people who need to see it from going to see it. Loads of people didn’t see “Suffragette” because they thought, “It’s a feminist movie, and I don’t want to see that kind of movie.”

W&H: Yeah, but everyone went and saw “Beauty and the Beast.”

Ga: I haven’t seen it, but I think that’s great.

W&H: It’s had the seventh-highest largest opening ever in the United States. Okay, last question: Is there anything that people don’t know that you want them to know about you or the movie? Any misconceptions about Gemma?

Ga: There are a lot of misconceptions about me, but that’s okay. I’d like my work to speak for itself. I don’t feel like I need to prove anything too much — I just want it to go out there and see what it does.

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Gemma Arterton Talks Sexism and Likability in “Their Finest” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Film Companies Fight to Get a Piece of TV Drama Action

Film Companies Fight to Get a Piece of TV Drama Action
Movie world folks are increasingly migrating into high-end television drama, and many of the new series on offer at MipTV are the progeny of this cross-pollination.

Babylon Berlin,” which is screening at the market, is produced by X Filme and creatively led by filmmaker Tom Tykwer. X Filme’s Stefan Arndt says the same production team that created the $100 million “Cloud Atlas” put together “Babylon Berlin,” and he’d be happy to screen it in theaters because the quality of the performances and the production values are as high as their films. At the end of the day, he adds, viewers don’t care whether it’s a movie or a TV show they are watching as long as they are entertained and “surprised.”

Riviera,” which also screens at MipTV, is the creation of Neil Jordan, who nabbed an Oscar for “The Crying Game,” and an Emmy nomination for TV series “The Borgias,” and
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Jackie Collins’ ‘Lucky Santangelo’ Novels Land At Universal, Monumental, Working Title

  • Deadline
Jackie Collins’ ‘Lucky Santangelo’ Novels Land At Universal, Monumental, Working Title
Exclusive: Jackie Collins’ 10-novel series based based around mob daughter Lucky Santangelo is headed for the big screen. Universal Pictures has acquired the book series, which will be produced by Monumental Pictures partners Debra Hayward & Alison Owen, and Working Title partners Tim Bevan & Eric Fellner. Moira Buffini, whose credits include the Cary Fukanaga-directed Jane Eyre and the Stephen Frears-directed Tamara Drewe, will adapt the novels. The hope is to make a…
See full article at Deadline »

Stephen Frears to receive honorary Sarajevo award

  • ScreenDaily
Stephen Frears to receive honorary Sarajevo award
British director’s latest film, Florence Foster Jenkins, to screen at the festival’s open air theatre.

Stephen Frears, the British director of The Queen and Philomena, is to receive the Honorary Heart of Sarajevo Award at the 22nd Sarajevo Film Festival (Aug 12-20).

Frears, who was previously the subject of the festival’s tribute programme in 2002, will have his latest film - Florence Foster Jenkins starring Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant - screened as part of Sarajevo’s Open Air programme.

Previous recipients of the honorary award have included Angelina Jolie, Gael Garcia Bernal, Mike Leigh and last year Benicio del Toro.

Frears breakthrough as a feature film director came with the low budget hit My Beautiful Laundrette in 1985 and made his Hollywood debut with Dangerous Liaisons in 1989, which received six Oscar nominations.

His first Oscar nomination as best director can in 1991 for The Grifters, produced by Martin Scorsese, while his 1998 western
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Ynms: Florence Foster Jenkins

Murtada here. Stephen Frears recent output has been uneven. This month, his Lance Armstrong biopic The Program was met with lukewarm reviews and a VOD purgatory release, while Lay the Favorite (2012) and Tamara Drewe (2010) were both immediately forgotten. However he does well when teamed with grand actresses in intimate dramas (The Queen, Philomena). So we are cautiously optimistic about his collaboration with Meryl Streep in Florence Foster Jenkins. The story, of an amateur opera singer, known and ridiculed for her very bad singing and her complete delusion about her abilities, is intriguing.

Let's break down the newly released trailer..... after the jump.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Florence Foster Jenkins: the first trailer

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Meryl Streep, Simon Helberg and Hugh Grant star in upcoming comedy drama, Florence Foster Jenkins. Here's the trailer...

Get yourself a bunch of Stephen Frears movies and you're going to end up with a good night in. We'd recommend Philomena, High Fidelity, Dirty Pretty Things, Tamara Drewe and My Beautiful Laundrette to get you going. Let us know if you need more.

Frears' next film is Florence Foster Jenkins, which brings Meryl Streep, Simon Helberg, Hugh Grant, Rebecca Ferguson and Nina Arianda together in its cast. The first trailer and synopsis for the movie have just been released too, so let's take a mooch.

Trailer first....

And here's the synopsis.

The comedy drama directed by Stephen Frears (Philomena, The Queen) tells the inspirational true story of the eponymous New York heiress who obsessively pursued her dream of becoming a great singer. The film celebrates the human spirit,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Altitude boards 'The Carrier'

Altitude boards 'The Carrier'
The distributor has taken UK rights to Evolutionary Films’ Sci-Fi feature.

Altitude Film Entertainment has taken UK distribution rights to Sci-Fi action genre film The Carrier from sales agent Evolutionary Films.

The film premiered at London’s Raindance Film Festival (Sept 23 - Oct 4).

The Carrier follows eights survivors of a pandemic on Earth who escape to the skies in a damaged commercial jet.

The film is the second feature from director Anthony Woodley, after 2011’s Outpost 11.

Woodley also worked as an aerial technician on bond films Casino Royale and there recently released Spectre.

The film stars Edmund Kingsley (Hugo), Jack Gordon (Captain America: The First Avenger) and Josie Taylor (Tamara Drewe).

Luke Healy produced the film, and also co-wrote the script with director Woodley, Stefan Mitchell and Helen Kingston.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Screen unveils Stars of Tomorrow 2015 with Lff

  • ScreenDaily
Screen International has revealed its Stars of Tomorrow, spotlighting the hottest up-and-coming actors and filmmakers.

Click here to access the Screen Stars of Tomorrow microsite, including full profiles, picture gallery and digital edition

Now in its 12th year, the annual showcase spotlights up-and-coming actors, writers, directors and producers who will be making waves in the years to come.

Scroll down for the full list

Past Stars of Tomorrow selected by Screen include Benedict Cumberbatch (2004), Oscar-winner Eddie Redmayne (2005), Suffragette star Carey Mulligan, Star Wars: The Force Awakens actor John Boyega (2011) and last year’s cover stars Taron Egerton, Olivia Cooke and Sam Keeley.

Stars of Tomorrow editor Fionnuala Halligan curates the stars after considering hundreds of candidates and consulting with industry experts including casting agents, talent agents, managers, producers and directors.

This year marks a partnership with the BFI London Film Festival (Oct 7-18), which will present the Stars as part of its programme of events.

Halligan
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Screen, Lff unveil Stars of Tomorrow 2015

  • ScreenDaily
Screen International has revealed its Stars of Tomorrow, spotlighting the hottest up-and-coming actors and filmmakers.

Click here to access the Screen Stars of Tomorrow microsite, including full profiles, picture gallery and digital edition

Now in its 12th year, the annual showcase spotlights up-and-coming actors, writers, directors and producers who will be making waves in the years to come.

Scroll down for the full list

Past Stars of Tomorrow selected by Screen include Benedict Cumberbatch (2004), Oscar-winner Eddie Redmayne (2005), Suffragette star Carey Mulligan, Star Wars: The Force Awakens actor John Boyega (2011) and last year’s cover stars Taron Egerton, Olivia Cooke and Sam Keeley.

Stars of Tomorrow editor Fionnuala Halligan curates the stars after considering hundreds of candidates and consulting with industry experts including casting agents, talent agents, managers, producers and directors.

This year marks a partnership with the BFI London Film Festival (Oct 7-18), which will present the Stars as part of its programme of events.

Halligan
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Gemma Bovery review – flawed but flimsily likable

Gemma Arterton is a joy to watch but can’t carry this Posy Simmonds-meets-Flaubert caper alone

Mercurial Gemma Arterton provided the spark that sold Tamara Drewe to cinema audiences, and she’s the main attraction again in this latest Posy Simmonds adaptation. Arterton plays Gemma Bovery (the on-screen title initially withholds the “G”), a restless Brit who decamps to bucolic Normandy, where her life imitates that of literature’s most infamously bored housewife. Under the lustful gaze of Flaubert fan Martin (Fabrice Luchini, all startled eyes and hangdog mouth), Gemma is soon bedding the local young buck, unnoticed by husband Charlie (Jason Flemyng), who’s too busy restoring antiques to keep track of his marriage.

Arterton has flirty fun with the title role, and her scenes with Luchini boast a satirical crackle that’s missing elsewhere. Cinematographer Christophe Beaucarne drools over the picturesque landscapes while Bruno Colais’s music
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Gemma Bovery review: Gemma Arterton sets pulses racing, but she's reduced to a French fancy

Gemma Bovery review: Gemma Arterton sets pulses racing, but she's reduced to a French fancy
Director: Anne Fontaine; Screenwriters: Anne Fontaine, Pascal Bonitzer; Starring: Fabrice Luchini, Gemma Arterton, Jason Flemyng, Niels Schneider; Running time: 99 mins; Certificate: 15

Gemma Arterton sets pulses racing in rural France as a modern, much fluffier version of Gustave Flaubert's 19th-century heroine Madame Bovary, but in essence, she is merely replaying her part in 2010's similarly-themed comedy drama Tamara Drewe; that is to say, an object of lust rather than a fully fleshed-out human being.

Both films are based on graphic novels by Posy Simmonds which started life as cartoon strips for The Guardian (the former being a reworking of Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd). In this case, Flaubert's fallen woman, Gemma, is a Londoner who moves to Normandy with her furniture restorer husband (Jason Flemyng) to live the bucolic life that many a tube-riding, broadsheet-reader fantasises about. Arterton is, as usual, bursting with charm, although the focus is
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Film Review: ‘Gemma Bovery’

Film Review: ‘Gemma Bovery’
A romantic busybody in Normandy becomes convinced a newly arrived English expat will end up just like her literary near-homonym in the blandly middle-of-the-road “Gemma Bovery.” Adapted from the graphic novel by Posy Simmonds, author of the Thomas Hardy update “Tamara Drewe,” the script flattens the main characters and makes one nostalgic for Flaubert’s observational acumen. Helmer Anne Fontaine (“Coco Before Chanel”) emphasizes cheeriness and whodunit elements at the expense of any insightful revision, resulting in a generic drama that could be mildly diverting on long-haul flights. Local play took a precipitous tumble last September after opening at No. 1; kudos to Gaumont for getting it on so many fest programs.

The story unfolds via the first-person narration of Martin Joubert (Fabrice Luchini), recently returned to his father’s village after a less-than-stellar Paris career in publishing. He’s taken over Dad’s bakery with his chatterbox wife, Valerie (Isabelle Candelier
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First Look: Meryl Streep & Hugh Grant in 'Florence Foster Jenkins'

Well aren't these two looking adorable? Pathé and BBC Films have debuted a first look photo at the film Florence Foster Jenkins, the latest from director Stephen Frears following Philomena, Lay the Favorite and Tamara Drewe. In Florence Foster Jenkins, Meryl Streep plays the legendary New York heiress who became an opera singer. Hugh Grant plays her partner St Clair Bayfield. The two can be seen riding in the back of a car, heading home from (what seems like) a night at Carnegie Hall. No release date is set yet, and the film just barely started shooting, so this is a very early first look and we likely won't see this until 2016. Anyway, take a look at the two in full below. Photo sent out directly from Pathé and BBC Films' publicity. Florence Foster Jenkins is the true story of the legendary New York heiress and socialite who obsessively
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'Far From the Madding Crowd' Isn't the Only New Period Drama You Need to See

  • Indiewire
'Far From the Madding Crowd' Isn't the Only New Period Drama You Need to See
Watch: Carey Mulligan Smolders On and Off-Screen in 'Far from the Madding Crowd' Trailer Published in 1874, Thomas Hardy's Victorian-era novel "Far From the Madding Crowd" is hardly unique material for the screen. It was first adapted in 1915, revisited in John Schleinger's 1967 version, uprooted to modern times in Stephen Frears' "Tamara Drewe," and transformed into a "Masterpiece Theater" miniseries in 1998. Thomas Vinterberg's gorgeous treatment of the story, which tracks individualistic farm owner Bathsheba Everdene (Carey Mulligan) as she runs her property and evades the advances of various suitors, arrives in theaters this week treading no fresh ground. At the same time, the movie rejuvenates the material with a restrained eye for the details of the story — the relationships between a small cast of passionate characters — that frees it from the constraints of its era. With its gorgeously photographed backdrop of the British countryside's rolling...
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