Mad Men (2007–2015)
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Wee Small Hours 

Betty tries to meet with Henry Francis again, while Don steps up his pursuit of his daughter's former teacher. At the office, Don disappoints Conrad Hilton and is forced by a client to fire Salvatore over an unwelcome advance.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Joan Harris (credit only)
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Ken Cosgrove (credit only)
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Storyline

Connie is constantly calling Don, even in the middle of the night. But the carrot of the entire Hilton account is enough for Don to endure these intrusions on his personal life. Don may ultimately have a black mark with Connie when he does not literally follow through with a thought Connie provides to him. Sal is working on a commercial for Lucky Strike. But an incident with the client, Lee Garner, Jr., may jeopardize not only his position on the account but his position at Sterling Cooper. Sal takes out his frustrations by resorting to his primal urges. At the Draper house, Don and Betty are both preoccupied with their infatuations, Don's with Sally's former teacher Suzanne Farrell, and Betty's with Henry Francis. Both go to extreme measures to progress those infatuations. Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Drama

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

11 October 2009 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Don picks up his daughter's teacher while she is out jogging, there is a brief mention on car radio of discovery of bodies of two unnamed young Manhattan women - a reference to the real-life "Career Girls Murders" case in which roommates Janice Wylie and Emily Hoffert were stabbed to death in their apartment on August 28, 1963. See more »

Goofs

Suzanne (Sally's old teacher) is wearing a form-fitting Bowdoin College t-shirt when Don stops her running. Bowdoin (Brunswick, Maine) was an all male college until 1972, and this takes place in 1963. Although conceivable that she got the shirt from a boyfriend, brother or father, it seems unlikely. See more »

Connections

References Perry Mason (1957) See more »

Soundtracks

Prelude To A Kiss
(uncredited)
By Nnenna Freelon
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User Reviews

 
Satisfying and Painful
19 August 2016 | by (Ossining, NY) – See all my reviews

While the ending of this episode seemed like a bit of a let-down, straight from the beginning to almost-the-end was amazing. Every once in a while, "Mad Men" gives you a little piece of what was happening at the time, and at least for me, I smile a little bit inside because, I don't know, there's something exhilarating about hearing about the famous "I have a dream" speech in a TV show and going "Oh, my God! That!" There's also something wonderful about knowing that certain things are going to happen that the characters aren't aware of. Ever since "Nixon vs. Kennedy" we're been at the edge of our seats wondering when the latter is going to meet his demise and the underlying suspense is wonderful. But, on to the main course of events.

At long last, we see the consequences of Sal's sexuality in the time period they're in. We knew in our hearts it was going to happen, but it's still gut-wrenching when it does. It's also the first time we sort of have a political opposition to Don, adding, with disgust, "you people," referring to the gay community. Don's always been on the right side of history, and here he isn't, and it's interesting. What goes through Sal's head there? Is Don really biased, or is it his time period? Will we ever see Sal again? I love Sal as a character, and I certainly hope we do. But this season has marked the end of a lot of people. First, Gene. Then Joan. Then, in one episode, both Sal and Connie Hilton.

Which brings me to my final praise for the episode: Hilton. What a magnificent character Connie Hilton is. He's responsible for bringing about some of the best writing in the show, and this episode is no exception. His departure was handled masterfully.

Satisfying to see lose ends tied up. Painful because of how it happens.


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