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Hyde Park on Hudson (2012)

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The story of the love affair between FDR and his distant cousin Margaret "Daisy" Suckley, centered around the weekend in 1939 when the King and Queen of the United Kingdom visited upstate New York.

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Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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FDR
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Missy
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Tommy
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Cameron
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Daisy's Aunt
Nancy Baldwin ...
Mrs. Astor
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President's Aide #1
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President's Aide #2
Eben Young ...
President's Aide #3
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Mary the Maid
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Storyline

In 1930s Hudson Valley, Margaret "Daisy" Suckley is reacquainted with her distant cousin, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, to help him relax at his family estate. That aid soon develops into much more as they become lovers. That puts Daisy in a unique position as Roosevelt receives the King and Queen of Britain in 1939 for a visit. As the Royal couple copes with the President's oddly plebeian arrangements, Daisy learns that there is far more to Roosevelt's life than she realized. With the world about to be set ablaze by war, friendships are struck and perspectives are gained on that special weekend that would make all the difference with a great, but very human, president. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

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One weekend that would unite two great nations See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for brief sexuality | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

1 February 2013 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

A Royal Weekend  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$81,362, 9 December 2012, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$6,367,780, 24 March 2013
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Final film of actress Elizabeth Wilson who portrayed Mrs. Roosevelt [Sara Delano Roosevelt aka Sarah Roosevelt]. See more »

Goofs

The Navy bandsmen playing during dinner are dressed as officers--bandsmen in the Navy are enlisted sailors. The conductor of the band would have been an officer or warrant officer, but not the bandsmen. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Daisy: Back then - this is years ago - I couldn't afford secrets. I just had chores. As a child growing up, we had been rich. And then, well, we weren't. And like most people during the Depression, I now lived each day as it came no longer expecting anything. Waiting. For nothing. And then...
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Connections

Referenced in Jeopardy!: Episode #33.101 (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

I Don't Want To Set The World On Fire
Written by Bernie Benjamin, Eddie Durham, Sol Marcus, Edward Saller
Performed by The Ink Spots
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User Reviews

 
Franklin Delano Murray.
31 December 2012 | by See all my reviews

Hyde Park on Hudson is no mixed bag, as some may have you think. Bill Murray turns in a perfectly mannered, whimsical performance as FDR and is very ably supported by an award-worthy cast that includes Laura Linney and Olivia Williams. It's funny, yes, but it's not a laugh riot, nor is it meant to be. It's a postcard look at a lost time, the first visit of an English monarch to a sitting U.S. president, dappled with a touch of uncertain, unlikely, and illicit romance.

It's a few years before The Big One, WWII, but there's a storm a-brewing in Europe. Everyone knows it, but relations between the U.S. and England have been strained, something about revolting and then fighting in the War of 1812. Ancient history to some but not all, it would seem. At any rate, King George VI and Queen Consort Elizabeth (Samuel West and Olivia Coleman, respectively) travel to America to visit Roosevelt with the intention of securing his support for the upcoming war. But rather than host them in stuffy Washington, DC, FDR (contrary to the real visit) invites his royal guests to his home away from home, Springwood, a stately manor in upstate New York. It happens to be on the Hudson River, or near it, in case the title has tripped you up.

Now, FDR was quite an unusual president. He was the last to serve more than two terms, as the Constitution was amended later. Also, he had polio, which he had contracted as a child. The funny thing is this - people went to great lengths to pretend nothing was wrong with Roosevelt's legs whatsoever. The Emperor had no clothes. Even the press were complicit, gamely waiting for the president to be lowered into the back of a convertible before taking their pictures and asking their questions. Can you imagine that today? The slightest limp by a leader seems to imply a lack of leadership in the minds of some.

And so it was at the time, only not. The nation turned its eyes to Roosevelt as a resolute, optimistic leader, a man who could help them finally rid themselves of that awful Depression, and so they gladly ignore whatever shortcomings he may have. The king of England, meanwhile, is in a similar situation. He is the same George depicted in The King's Speech - you know, the one about the king who stuttered? FDR, who is much older, is not as self conscious about his malady as he used to be, whereas poor George is practically frozen by his own. Now, recall that the king and queen are visiting to gain the support of America; FDR already knows this. He could easily just issue a statement to the effect that the USA would help England in any way it could, but he chooses to host royalty instead. He wishes to meet the man beneath the crown, and he wishes to size him up.

Enter into the fray a quite-distant cousin of FDR, a Daisy Stuckley (Linney), who narrates the story. Daisy is introduced to the president, and somehow they find a connection. Daisy, like the arriving king, is also unsure of herself, a bit of an ugly duckling among the glamor of the president's residence. They find in each other a kindred spirit. Franklin is more or less estranged from his saintly wife Eleanor at this point (they live in separate houses in New York!), and although he cannot walk, he does enjoy him some female company.

But what is this story really about, anyway? It depends on your own perspective. Some will see this as a docudrama reflecting the meeting of two leaders (and their wives); some will see it as a comedy, an intelligent, subtle comedy with a barely smirking Bill Murray. Others still will find romance in almost every scene, no matter who the players, no matter where the setting.

Murray deserves an Oscar nomination here, and perhaps the Academy will make up for their Lost in Translation snub. Linney does as well; her Daisy never undergoes a sudden transformation into a woman with a real backbone. She seems sad much of the time, working in the White House with tightened lips. Her life appears joyless; that is, until she has some alone time with Franklin, whence a window to a sunnier day slowly opens.

Hyde Park on Hudson is a gorgeous movie with a splendid, bemused, and convincing performance by Bill Murray as our 32nd president and endearing, exhilarating role for Laura Linney. Each should be richly rewarded come award time.


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