Garrow's Law (2009) - News Poster

(2009– )

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Harry Potter then and now: What do 12 of the child stars look like today?

It's been a whopping 14 years since Harry Potter and The Philosopher's Stone made its big screen debut.

A lot has changed since then - most notably the child stars which the movie franchise made famous.

Now - after the internet was astonished to see what Harry Potter's Neville Longbottom looks like now - Digital Spy has donned our sorting hat to see what the now-muggles look like today...

1. Harry Melling as Dudley Dursley

Post-Potter, Harry Melling has had parts in Merlin, Just William and Garrow's Law. Last year, he also performed a one-man play in New York called peddling and starred opposite Scarlett Johnson, Patsy Ferran and Felix Scott in The Angry Brigade.

2. Matthew Lewis as Neville Longbottom

We nearly lost our Snitch when we saw the transformation Matthew Lewis has had since his days as Neville Longbottom. He's gained a beard, good looks and also a role in BBC Three comedy Bluestone 42.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

'Mr Selfridge' series two begins filming, Polly Walker joins cast

Polly Walker and Aidan McArdle have joined the cast of Mr Selfridge.

Prisoners' Wives star Walker and Garrow's Law actor McArdle will appear opposite Jeremy Piven in the ITV drama's second series.

McArdle will play Lord Loxley - estranged husband of Lady Mae Loxley (Katherine Kelly), while Walker is cast as Delphine Day - a Bohemian novelist and businesswoman who befriends Harry Selfridge's wife Rose (Frances O'Connor).

Ten new episodes of Mr Selfridge - set four years after the events of the first series - began filming in London this week.

Series two will follow Harry Selfridge's efforts to keep his department store afloat as the Great War approaches.

Wild at Heart's Cal Macaninch will also join the hit period drama as Mr Thackeray - the store's new head of fashion.

"ITV Studios is thrilled to be making a second series of Mr Selfridge," said Kate Lewis, executive producer for ITV Studios.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

TV review: Ripper Street; Neil Armstrong – First Man on the Moon; The Hotel

It throws in everything from CSI to Sherlock, but Ripper Street is proper crime drama

Cor blimey. East London, 1889, ain't no place for no shrinking violet. Well, not according to Ripper Street (BBC1, Sunday). The men are all at the fight (bare–knuckle, naturally) and the women are all on the game, even though it's only a few months since the horribly mutilated body of Jack the Ripper's last victim was found. Suspicion, rumour and terror run in the gutters, along with all the usual Victorian filth.

Then there's blood in the gutters, too. Another body, another young woman, with the Ripper's calling card slices. Is it him – is Jack back?

Sensible, handsome Detective Inspector Edmund Reid (Matthew Macfadyen) isn't so sure. He's not jumping to any conclusions, nor ruling anything out, just going about the investigation in the methodical, pragmatic way he would any other, pinning photos and stuff
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'Harry Potter' star Helen McCrory joins ITV's 'Leaving'

'Harry Potter' star Helen McCrory joins ITV's 'Leaving'
ITV's new drama Leaving has cast Helen McCrory and newcomer Callum Turner in lead roles. The three-part series - from Public Enemies and Garrow's Law writer Tony Marchant - was first announced in January. Leaving will focus on the relationship between disillusioned 25-year-old Aaron (Turner) and unhappy 45-year-old wife and mother Julie (McCrory). When the pair begin working together at a Cheshire country house hotel, they share an intimate moment which takes them both by surprise and must face the consequences of their actions. McCrory's recent credits include the role of Narcissa Malfoy in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and BBC Four's Jean Shrimpton biopic We'll Take Manhattan. She and (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

'Garrow's Law' cancelled by BBC One

'Garrow's Law' cancelled by BBC One
Garrow's Law has been cancelled by BBC One. The period legal drama, which starred Andrew Buchan and aired on Sunday nights, had picked up consistently good ratings. However, it will not be returning for a fourth series, the Radio Times reports. "BBC One will screen more than 20 new dramas this year, but Garrow's Law will not be returning," a BBC spokesperson confirmed. Garrow's Law (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Eton spawns a new breed of stage and screen luminaries

Renowned as launch pad for politicians and TV personalities, the school has found new role as source of acting talent

From Wellington to Gladstone, and Macmillan to Cameron, Eton College has long been a seedbed for British politics and for the diplomatic service. More recently a smattering of television personalities, conductors and Olympic sportsmen have also been able to look back at schooldays spent on the celebrated playing fields. Now though, that famously establishment school near Windsor is increasingly being hailed as a first-rate launch pad for a theatrical career.

Leading Old Etonian actors such as Tom Hiddleston, Harry Lloyd, Eddie Redmayne, Henry Faber and Harry Hadden-Paton are suddenly at the top of the list for casting directors on the most prestigious film and television projects.

This week Hiddleston, star of Steven Spielberg's War Horse, is in Wales filming Sir Richard Eyre's Henry IV, along with Faber and Lloyd,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Eton spawns a new breed of stage and screen luminaries

Renowned as launch pad for politicians and TV personalities, the school has found new role as source of acting talent

From Wellington to Gladstone, and Macmillan to Cameron, Eton College has long been a seedbed for British politics and for the diplomatic service. More recently a smattering of television personalities, conductors and Olympic sportsmen have also been able to look back at schooldays spent on the celebrated playing fields. Now though, that famously establishment school near Windsor is increasingly being hailed as a first-rate launch pad for a theatrical career.

Leading Old Etonian actors such as Tom Hiddleston, Harry Lloyd, Eddie Redmayne, Henry Faber and Harry Hadden-Paton are suddenly at the top of the list for casting directors on the most prestigious film and television projects.

This week Hiddleston, star of Steven Spielberg's War Horse, is in Wales filming Sir Richard Eyre's Henry IV, along with Faber and Lloyd,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Sherlock is cheeky entertainment, insists BBC after nudity complaints

Executives say they 'thought very carefully' about including images of naked dominatrix before the 9pm watershed

BBC executives "thought very carefully" before including the pre-watershed nude scenes in Sherlock that drew around 100 complaints, but decided to go ahead because the drama is "cheeky entertainment", according to controller of drama commissioning Ben Stephenson.

Stephenson said that Sherlock fans will have to wait at least until next year for more episodes of the hit show, starring Benedict Cumberbatch.

Speaking about the Sherlock footage of actress Lara Pulver, who plays dominatrix Irene Adler, Stephenson said he "sort of expected" complaints would be made.

In the New Year's Day episode, A Scandal in Belgravia, Cumberbatch's Sherlock Holmes meets his match in the form of Adler, who is naked when they first meet. However, thanks to the camera angles and Pulver's carefully placed arms and hands, viewers do not see her completely naked.

He said:
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The best television of 2011: drama

British drama had an ambitious but somewhat uneven year – while the Scandanavians produced a surprise hit. But what were your favourites?

It would be pushing it to suggest that 2011 was a landmark year for drama but viewers were certainly not badly served, with some fine new work emerging from both the UK and abroad.

In Britain, BBC2 led the field, in part thanks to the much-trumpeted extra investment that gave us The Crimson Petal and the White, The Shadow Line, The Night Watch and The Hour. A line-up that the BBC should rightly be proud of, but perhaps placed too much emphasis on.

Of that line-up, it was The Crimson Petal that played best for me, with Romola Garai capturing my attention as Sugar far more than she did as The Hour's Bel Rowley. Lucinda Coxon's adaptation of Michael Faber's novel was beautifully judged, with Chris O'Dowd a revelation as William Rackham.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'Downton Abbey' creator Julian Fellowes's 'Titanic': Trailer, pictures

'Downton Abbey' creator Julian Fellowes's 'Titanic': Trailer, pictures
ITV has released a trailer and new pictures from Julian Fellowes's forthcoming historical drama Titanic. The Downton Abbey creator's four-part miniseries will mark the centenary of the ship's sinking in the Atlantic Ocean on April 15, 1912. David Calder, who played former Manchester United chairman Harold Hardman in BBC Two drama United, will portray the ship's captain Edward Smith, while Steven Waddington (Waterloo Road, Garrow's Law) plays Rms Titanic's second officer, Charles Lightoller. The cast of Titanic also includes Linus Roache, (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

'X Factor' Misha B elimination seen by 11.7m

Misha B's semi-final exit from The X Factor drew an audience of 11.71m, according to overnight figures. The results show (+1: 328k/1.3%) was followed by A Night with Beyoncé, which attracted 4.36m (17.4%) from 9pm (+1: 168k/0.9%). The Cube took 4.25m (15.9%) from 7pm (+1: 173k/0.6%) and 582k (4%) turned up for the Fa Cup highlights show. On BBC One, 10.53m (37.8%) tuned in to see Robbie Savage eliminated from Strictly Come Dancing from 7.25pm, with 7.64m (31.5%) taking in Countryfile just before. Antiques Roadshow got 6.59m (22.8%) in the 8pm hour, and Garrow's Law was watched by 4.24m (16.6%) from 9pm. Have I Got a Bit More News for You quizzed 2.44m (15%) from 10.25pm. BBC Two's The Party's Over: How the West Went Bust and How to Build... grabbed 1.03m (3.9%) from 7pm and 1.13m (3.9%) from (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Letters: Garrow's defence

As co-directors (with Clive Emsley) of the Old Bailey Proceedings Online, from which much of the material for Garrow's Law is derived, we are fully aware that the trials presented do not faithfully reproduce all the facts (Letters, 17 November). But we also recognise the difference between historical drama and documentary. The series underlines one important historical truth: in the 1780s, when the English criminal justice system was at its most oppressive, William Garrow, as counsel for the defence in hundreds of trials, pioneered vigorous strategies which significantly shifted the balance of power in the courtroom. Not least, he helped to establish the principle that defendants are innocent until proven guilty. The creators of Garrow's Law have been explicit about which trials inform which episode (The real cases behind Garrow's Law) and in doing so have contributed to creating a more honest form of historical fiction.

Professor Tim Hitchcock University of Hertfordshire,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Letters: Garrow's travesty

The first instalment of the new series of Garrow's Law (The weekend's TV, G2, 14 November) showed William Garrow, habitual advocate for the underdog, defending the madman Hadfield, accused of high treason for shooting at King George III. It was a travesty. The heroic defender who secured Hadfield's acquittal was not Garrow, but Thomas Erskine. Garrow was indeed involved: but as junior counsel for the crown. So his role was precisely the opposite of the one the BBC assigned to him. His task was to cross-examine the defence witnesses, to make them say that Hadfield, contrary to all appearances, was really sane. By 1800 Garrow's talents had been noticed by the government. He regularly appeared for the crown – a route which led him to preferment, first as attorney general and eventually to the bench. The BBC's charter and its producers' guidelines say all programmes should be "fair and show a respect for
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV review: Garrow's Law; Come Fly With Me - the Story of Pan Am

Part-barrister, part-shrink, Garrow returns with conviction

As one period door closes, so another opens. Anyone suffering from Sunday night Downton withdrawals would have had their symptoms eased by the return of Garrow's Law (BBC1, Sunday). In fact early on in the first episode, I did begin to wonder if Garrow might actually be morphing into a similar costume soap as the opening scenes with Garrow and his lover, Lady Sarah, pining for her child held in the custody of her ex, the evil Sir Arthur, were filmed in something suspiciously close to soft focus; but then normal Georgian courtroom drama – complete with Old Bailey extras loudly yaying and naying on cue – was resumed.

It's not often that a drama based on real people – William Garrow was an 18th-century barrister credited both with originating the idea of tough cross-examination and championing the underdog and Lady Sarah was his squeeze – lasts well
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

I'm a Celebrity is king of the jungle with 11.5 million viewers

Older contestants including Freddie Starr and Lorraine Chase help ITV1 show attract its best ever opening night audience

ITV's strategy of populating I'm a Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here! with a number of older than usual contestants appears to have paid dividends on Sunday night, with more than 11 million viewers tuning in – the show's best ever opening night audience.

This year's 11th series includes a string of older faces – Willie Carson, Lorraine Chase and Freddie Starr are all in their 60s.

The show averaged 11.5 million viewers and a 42.5% share across ITV1 and ITV1HD from 9pm, pipping last year's 11.2 million opening episode.

When figures for those who caught it on ITV1+1 are included the audience for the show, which also features The Only Way is Essex's Mark Wright and Stefanie Powers from 1980s TV show Hart to Hart, hit 11.8 million.

BBC1's returning drama Garrow's Law drew 4.9 million
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV turn-ons and turn-offs

This week's hits and misses

Turn-ons

Wallander

Uncork the gravadlax, mother – Inspector Förehead's back!

The Book Show

Another expert workout from the Sky Arts brain gym. Byo towel

C5's Fairground Attractions

Something wicked this way comes: seasoned barkers reveal truth behind buggered dodgems, harrowing leisurewear etc

Banged Up Abroad

More tales of judicial bloodyawfulness from the Costa Del Dunnit

Turn-offs

Garrow's Law

Alack, sir, thy integrity is in peril, for thou hast surely mistaken thy periwig for thy scripte

James May's Man Lab

Final reading from the Book of Worzel. This week, inevitably:

Germans

Discovery's Against the Tide

Rhubarbin' lubbers pontificate amid indiff'rent waves an' mellow-harshin' shots o' rheumatism

Merlin

Featured: putatively buff serfs, snoods at dawn & Zomg Dragonz!!!?! Not featured: a point

TelevisionMerlinSarah Dempster

guardian.co.uk © 2011 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Catch up TV Guide: From The Hidden World Of Girls to Jarvis Cocker's Sunday Service

Radio: The Hidden World Of Girls

Tina Fey hosts two excellent hour-long radio documentaries, based on the deceptively simple idea of telling the stories of young women around the world. The resulting shows, available to stream online, journey from South Dakota to Dublin via Russia and Jamaica, looking at topics as wide-ranging as the Taliban, contraception, environmental activism, hunting and the Beatles, with a contribution from Janelle Monáe.

www.prx.org

TV: North Square

Garrow's Law returns for a third series on Sunday night. For a more contemporary take on the courtroom, 4Od has the entire series of the This Life-ish North Square, the 2000 legal drama by Peter Moffat (Kavanagh QC, Silk, Criminal Justice). Helen McCrory and Rupert Penry-Jones are two of the young barristers trying to make a go of their careers in Leeds.

4Od

TV: The Office: An American Workplace

Following our Dunder Mifflin conundrum, you can go where the characters don't,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

DVD Review - Garrow's Law, Series 2

If there's a great British show that you're not watching, it's Garrow's Law. The show, which premiered on the BBC in 2009, is one of Acorn Media's best titles, alongside the genius Life on Mars and Single-Handed. The series has the unique conceit of being a legal drama set in the late 18th century, and centers upon barrister William Garrow, a real historical figure who coined the term "innocent until proven guilty." The series portrays Garrow as a legal revolutionary who begins to change the way trials are held in England through his new perspective and practice of persuading juries. The second series of the show arrives on DVD from Acorn Media August 2.

Click here for my review of Garrow's Law, Series 1.

To call the series anything but great would be wrong. It's deliberately paced, with both the procedural element and an overarching storyline at perfect balance within each episode. The
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Best Brit TV - Original Prime Suspect, Garrow's Law and more to DVD

The best in British TV comes to DVD courtesy of Acorn Media (Upstairs, Downstairs: 40th Anniversary Edition) as they continue to bring some of the best series in all of television to home video, including the U.S. debut of "Vera", a new mystery series starring two-time Oscar nominee Brenda Blethyn. Coinciding with NBC.s remake Helen Mirren.s "Prime Suspect", Series 1 in an individual season set featuring guest stars Ralph Fiennes and Tom Wilkinson; Agatha Christie.s Poirot, featuring new adaptations starring David Suchet. Plus Garrow's Law Series 2, called .BBC period drama at its very best.; Reggie Perrin, a hilarious update of the beloved British comedy; Murphy's Law Complete Collection starring James Nesbitt (The Hobbit) as an undercover cop;
See full article at Monsters and Critics »
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