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Unlike American television, where even premium-cable series typically have at least 10 episodes, British television has many recurring series that have only a handful of episodes. Highly regarded shows such as "Foyle's War" and "Luther," for example, have only two to four episodes a year.

More than that, the people behind "Sherlock" treat their work as something different from simply making extra-long television programs. In an August, 2011 press release from BBC One, "Sherlock" co-creator Steven Moffat responded to suggestions that there should be more than three episodes in each season/series by saying, "We think of them as films because they are ninety minutes long and once we knew we weren't doing hour long episodes they needed to be on that sort of scale. They have to have the size and weight of a movie."

No one really knows... All the possibilities shown in "The Empty Hearse" were different theories of characters. The theory at the end of the show is also one of Anderson's theories and he is imagining Sherlock talking to him.

They did not appear together before "Sherlock." However, they are both in "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey," "The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug," and "The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies." Martin Freeman plays the lead (Bilbo Baggins), and Benedict Cumberbatch performs as the dragon Smaug and The Necromancer, both through voice and motion capture.


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