With the 2010 Olympics approaching, will the world get to know Vancouver's darkest secret? 'Streets of Plenty' chronicles one man's perilous journey to live in Vancouver's downtown east ... See full summary »

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4 nominations. See more awards »

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Misha Kleider ...
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Gregor Robertson ...
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Gabor Mate ...
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Thomas Kerr ...
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Liz Evans ...
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Anita Palepu ...
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Will Small ...
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Kurt Preinsburg ...
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With the 2010 Olympics approaching, will the world get to know Vancouver's darkest secret? 'Streets of Plenty' chronicles one man's perilous journey to live in Vancouver's downtown east side ghetto. The rules of this twisted social experiment? Starting with only a pair of underwear, he must survive the harsh winter streets for 31 days. He has no money, no friends, no family, and most importantly, no home. He must navigate the institutions, policies and services alongside the thousands of people that call Vancouver's streets home. Written by Anonymous

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5 February 2010 (USA)  »

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Crazy Credits

Special thanks to: Everyone we met on the street... See more »

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Very well done
12 March 2010 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

I'm giving this a 10 because of the sheer courage involved in the making of this documentary. I'm from Vancouver and have lived here most of my life, and I'm from an upper-middle class family, like the guy in the movie. Like him, I see homeless people on the streets every single day and I feel frustrated and impotent about the problem. The black-and-white contrast between Vancouver's so-called "best city in the world" status with the Downtown Eastside is appalling, to say the least.

What this documentary has done for me is given me a safe but realistic fly-on-the-wall look at the epidemic on my streets. Some may criticize this man as being a spoiled rich white kid who could have gone home anytime he wanted to, but you can't criticize him for what he has done

  • bringing attention to Vancouver's biggest problem.




There are three kinds of people in this world. The people who look at something and think: "Man, I would love to do that", but don't do a thing. The people who look at something and criticize it, but don't do anything or offer anything better. And then, the people who go out and DO it.

This guy went out and did it. I'm the guy who would "love" to do it, but I don't have the courage to do it.

So, this documentary and the people behind it have my respect. It's a powerful documentary and it's striking in its bare-bones approach to a decades-old problem that just seems to be getting worse every day even when the Olympic Games came around.


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