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Autoreiji (2010)

R | | Crime, Drama | 12 June 2010 (Japan)
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The boss of a major crime syndicate orders his lieutenant to bring a rogue gang of drug traffickers in line, a job that gets passed on to his long-suffering subordinate.

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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Ôtomo (as Beat Takeshi)
...
...
Ishihara (as Ryô Kase)
Fumiyo Kohinata ...
Sôichirô Kitamura ...
Tadashi Sakata ...
Kenji Morinaga ...
Abe
Masaki Miura ...
Tokio Emoto ...
Emoto
Jun'ichi Nitta ...
Toshiyuki Watarai
Masashi Iwadera
Yûjirô Komura
Kenji Ohara ...
Toshimichi Tasaki
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Storyline

The plot concerns a struggle for power amongst Tokyo's Yakuza clans, today just as likely to be playing the stock market as shaking down pachinko parlors, over which the Sanmo-kai clan holds sway in the face of constant betrayal and ever-changing allegiances. The Sanmo-kai chairman learns that his henchman Ikemoto has struck an alliance with the drug-dealing Murase family, and is not best pleased, to say the least. The ensuing retaliation triggers an orgy of killings, territorial invasions and score settling while law enforcement officers are too corrupt to intervene. Written by Palm Springs Internation Film Festival

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

one wrong move and it's all out war See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language and brief sexuality | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

12 June 2010 (Japan)  »

Also Known As:

Outrage  »

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2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Following a string of unconventional, commercially unappealing films, Takeshi Kitano engineered this film specifically as commercially appealing, going back to the genre which brought him the most success, and going as far as imagining the death scenes first and writing a story around them later. See more »

Goofs

At the bathhouse killing sequence, Ôtomo enters the steam room and sees four guys. However, the camera captures him killing three men and omits the fourth guy on the right corner, which never reappears in between shots during the shooting and also when the dead bodies appear in another sequence. See more »

Quotes

African Ambassador: No way. I won't do business with your kind.
Ishihara: Keep talking like that and we'll fuckin' kill you.
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Connections

Followed by Beyond Outrage (2012) See more »

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User Reviews

 
A Welcome(?) Step Backwards for Takeshi
2 July 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Outrage is the film that many fans of director Kitano Takeshi (and, no doubt, his investors) have been clamoring for ever since he embarked on his art-house odyssey with 2002's Dolls. The ensuing years' films ranged from introspective (Takeshis) to wacky (Kantoku Banzai!), and brought him critical acclaim but not much success at the box office. Outrage is clearly designed to please fans of Takeshi's earlier films, such as Sonatine or Violent Cop: hard-boiled gangster films taking places in the shadowy world of Japan's yakuza.

The plot revolves around an internal power struggle within an established yakuza family: a fairly standard trope in gangster films in the East and West. Building on this frame Takeshi piles on a number of events, the sequence characterized by the sort of surreally disconnected quality that I associate with his films. It's difficult to follow causality from one event to the next, and in many cases they seem to operate as interesting vignettes loosely connected through the overarching plot. Some are blackly humorous, some are brutally violent, most are characterized by lots of yelling and cursing in the sort of coarse Japanese that's really difficult for non-native speakers to get. Luckily the plot is simple enough to follow, but I do wonder about missing out on some of the finer details...

The characters are filled out only in broad strokes, and most of the standard types are represented: the godfather-like boss, the loyal lieutenant, the conniving underling, the dundering muscle and so on. Takeshi gets generally excellent performances out of the cast, who manage to come off as sincere and spontaneous. He mentioned in a recent television interview that he shoots most of his scenes in only one or two takes, and the film feels fresh. There's some very good talent here, mostly genre actors but good ones. You develop sympathy for a lot of them by the film's end, which is a mark in its favor.

One of the things I really enjoyed about the film was Takeshi's camera-work, which remains sharp and eye-pleasing as ever. He makes effective use of wide-angle close-ups, and does some great riffs off of Coppola in several scenes. Long pans and still shots are also used well. One that really sticks out in my memory from the beginning of the film is a low, outside shot of a line of black cars, just the rear quarter panels, lined up one after the other traveling down the road. It's an odd shot, but serenely beautiful and effective at conveying a sense of the power and menace of the men inside.

On the minus side, the plot really is simplistic and predictable. Not to the extent of boredom, but once you understand the setup it's not at all hard to imagine how things are bound to turn out. Also, I thought the film felt, on the whole, a bit too clean. The cars in every scene are immaculately polished, every actor is decked out in a neatly arranged designer suit, and every set has all of its props in a neatly prescribed arrangement. It presents a somewhat dystopic, but ultimately whitewashed view of yakuza society that would feel retrograde in a Western gangster film.

Overall, it's nice to see a new yakuza film come out of Takeshi's shop, hallmarked with the same sort of black humor, extreme violence and artistic flair that we've come to expect from this perennial festival honoree. I would, however, have liked to see a bit more of how his intervening films might have affected this genre. Outrage is a good yakuza film, but doesn't do much (enough?) to step outside of its element.


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