Above Suspicion (2009–2012)
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The Red Dahlia 

The discovery of the mutilated body of a young woman seems to echo that of the notorious unsolved Los Angeles 'Black Dahlia' murder of the 1940s.

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Detective Anna Travis is working on a murder case that has created a media frenzy. The victim, Louise Pennel, a 24-year-old girl, was last seen in a London night club. Her body later dumped, horrifically mutilated and drained of blood. Her death is an ominous mirror image of an unsolved 1940s case in Los Angeles known as "The Black Dahlia". Detective Sergeant Anna Travis must race against time to catch this copycat killer. Written by Drew North

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Crime | Drama | Thriller

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(Technicolor)

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16 : 9
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Red Dahlia- Unimaginative drama by La Plante
9 January 2010 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Once again Linda La Plante's production company has churned out another of her novels and turned it into an ITV Drama. As Murder Dramas go, it is watchable, but it also filled with clichés and errors. For example, when friends of the first victim all say that she had taken to wearing a red rose in her hair, and there is no mention of a red dahlia, why does the character of Travis say, 'that's not a Dahlia, it's a red rose' when reading an article about the first murder? And later when the journalist mentions The Black Dahlia case, Travis replies- 'The Black What?'

The acting of both leads is quite wooden, with Reilly fluttering her eyelids and somehow making the same stupid mistakes all over again. I guess really it is down to having a bad script and some terrible actors. Langton is gruff and sometimes fatherly, but always a stereotype somehow.

Anyone watching La Plante's dramas will notice that she has once again used an already used plot (this time a real life murder). She did the same with her Trial and Retribution: Romeo and Juliet, where she stole the entire plot from the film The Vanishing. Basically she needs to come up with a few new ideas.

Basically, I do not recommend this drama.


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