(2013)

Critic Reviews

96

Metascore

Based on 49 critic reviews provided by Metacritic.com
100
Gravity shows us the glory of cinema's future. It thrills on so many levels. And because Cuar‪ón is a movie visionary of the highest order, you truly can't beat the view.
100
Gravity is harrowing and comforting, intimate and glorious, the kind of movie that makes you feel more connected to the world rather than less.
100
At once the most realistic and beautifully choreographed film ever set in space, Gravity is a thrillingly realized survival story spiked with interludes of breath-catching tension and startling surprise.
100
A science-fiction thriller of rare and diamond-hard brilliance.
100
Gravity is about as visceral an experience as you can have in a cinema, it's a technical marvel, and it's a blockbuster with heart and soul in spades.
100
The director's long-overdue follow-up to “Children of Men” is at once a nervy experiment in blockbuster minimalism and a film of robust movie-movie thrills, restoring a sense of wonder, terror and possibility to the bigscreen.
100
See Gravity in theaters, because on television something will be lost. Alfonso Cuarón has made a rare film whose mood, soul and profundity is bound up with its images. To see such images diminished would be to see a lesser film, perhaps even a pointless one.
100
Sandra Bullock, in the performance of a lifetime, spends most of this wondrous wallop of a movie lost in space, alone where no one can hear her scream.
100
The telling of this simple tale of survival required cutting-edge technology, but we don't notice the bells and whistles: They're on hand to immerse us in an unforgettable personal story.
100
A wildly suspenseful zero-g tale of survival 350 miles beyond the ozone layer, Alfonso Cuarón's space saga is emotionally jolting - and physically jolting, too.
100
Compared by some to “2001: A Space Odyssey,'' Cuarón's relatively intimate space epic is equally groundbreaking in the spectacular way it depicts space.
100
A thrill ride with a brain.
100
In one form or another, motion pictures have been with us since the middle of the 19th century, but there's never been one like Gravity. What's new in Alfonso Cuarón's 3-D space adventure is the nature of the motion. It's as if the movie medium had been set free to dance in a bedazzling zero-gravity dream sequence.
94
The fact that Cuarón's film strives to be something more than thoroughly harrowing - no small feat in and of itself - solidifies its existence as a marvel of not just technical craft but sheer imagination as well
91
Gravity lets you visit space without sugarcoating its dangers. It's a brilliant portrait of technology gone wrong that uses it just right.
90
Cuaron and his son Jonas have felt the need not just to come up with ways to keep the characters talking - there's even a mildly sneery reference to NPR at one point - but to brush in backstory and motivation, quite as if the peril of being isolated in space with a limited supply of oxygen weren't sufficient rationale for the characters' actions.
80
The film thrums with an ongoing existential dread. And yet, tellingly, Cuaron's film contains a top-note of compassion that strays at times towards outright sentimentality.
80
This isn't just the best-looking film of the year, it's one of the most awe-inspiring achievements in the history of special-effects cinema. So it's a shame that - as is so often the case with groundbreaking effects movies - the emotional content can't quite match up to the visual.

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