Good Morning, World (1967–1968)
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The Lady and the Pussycat 

David's father surprise's David with the announcement that he'd like to introduce his future wife to David, but there's more than one.

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Episode credited cast:
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David Lewis
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Linda Lewis
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Mary Margaret
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Harry Lewis
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Genevieve
Burt Taylor ...
Vinnie
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David's father surprise's David with the announcement that he'd like to introduce his future wife to David, but there's more than one.

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Comedy

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19 March 1968 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Last show of the series. See more »

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Too Many Fiancees
11 November 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Dave's (Joby Baker) father Harry (played by the instantly recognizable Simon Oakland who was one of the most prolific tough guy detectives/journalists/law enforcement figures in film and TV) is coming to Los Angeles with a surprise. He is getting married and brings his bride-to-be Genevieve (E.J. Peaker) to meet Dave and Linda (Julie Parrish). Dave is concerned of how young Genevieve is and has a heart-to-heart talk with his father who says that's only half of the problem. He also wants to marry the more matured Mary Margaret (played by Hollywood actress Jayne Meadows). Dave and Linda await the decision. The last episode of the series isn't one of the strongest, but is a decent offering with a fluid story.

---Reflections on the series--- I think part of the appeal of this series to me, a 26-year-old man, is how obscure it is today. "Good Morning, World" was created and produced by the creators and writers of "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and it certainly operates in its shadow. A number of episodes share the same plot scenario and in some cases takes direct lines and jokes. Everyone's tastes are different, but for me, about half of the episodes were fun and half were lacking to some degree. Being made available on DVD allowed me to begin a routine of watching one or two episodes each morning, and I fully looked forward to doing so each day. Some episodes were downright hilarious, chiefly "No News Like Nude News". When Billy De Wolfe as the station manager Roland B. Hutton was given a lot of screen time he really shined. He stole every scene he was in and is an underrated comedic actor. In general the best episodes are the ones he plays the biggest parts in. The show's opening titles are certainly influenced by the avant garde movement and combined with the upbeat, bossa nova-like music makes it fun. Goldie Hawn in her acting debut was fun in her minor supporting role as a neighbor. But, it wasn't without its flaws: there are times you feel something is lacking in the script, underdeveloped comedic scenes, poor character development, etc. The latter is mainly in regards to Ronnie Schell and Goldie Hawn's characters. We are given that they are in a relationship but it is always confusing as to whether it truly is so or not. One episode paints Schell's character in a bad light, overdone to the point the viewer is somewhat turned against him against what the script calls for. In the later stages of the series Joby Baker began tripping over some of his lines on screen and struggled remembering them. The show had potential but it's execution was commonly just off the mark. I'll conclude by saying if you're a true fan of classic television I recommend the minimal investment in this 26-epsiode series. There's laughs to be had.


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