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George Clooney Set For AFI Life Achievement Award, Amy Adams Prepares for American Cinematheque Tribute

  • Indiewire
George Clooney Set For AFI Life Achievement Award, Amy Adams Prepares for American Cinematheque Tribute
Keep up with the glitzy awards world with our weekly Awards Roundup column.

The American Film Institute (AFI) Board of Trustees has announced that actor, director, writer, and producer George Clooney will be the recipient of the 46th AFI Life Achievement Award, the highest honor for a career in film. The award will be presented to Clooney at a Gala Tribute on June 7, 2018, in Los Angeles, CA.

George Clooney is America’s leading man,” said Sir Howard Stringer, Chairman of the AFI Board of Trustees. “Director, producer, writer and actor — a modern-day screen icon who combines the glamour of a time gone by with a ferocious passion for ensuring art’s impact echoes beyond the screen. AFI is proud to present him with its 46th Life Achievement Award.”

The American Cinematheque has announced that Jake Gyllenhaal, Tom Hanks, Chris Messina, Natalie Portman and Kristen Stewart will appear in person to toast Amy Adams,
See full article at Indiewire »

George Clooney George Clooney Recipient Of 46th AFI Life Achievement Award

The American Film Institute (AFI) Board of Trustees announced today that actor, director, writer and producer George Clooney will be the recipient of the 46th AFI Life Achievement Award, the highest honor for a career in film. The award will be presented to Clooney at a Gala Tribute on June 7, 2018, in Los Angeles, CA. The AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute special will return for its sixth year with Turner Broadcasting to air on TNT, followed by encore presentations on sister network Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Audi and Vizio return as Official Sponsors of the event.

George Clooney is America’s leading man,” said Sir Howard Stringer, Chairman of the AFI Board of Trustees. “Director, producer, writer and actor — a modern-day screen icon who combines the glamour of a time gone by with a ferocious passion for ensuring art’s impact echoes beyond the screen. AFI is proud to present him
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sky Original Series ‘Tin Star’ Already Commissioned For Season Two

The first season has not even hit the airwaves yet, but a second series of brand-new Sky Original Production Tin Star, starring BAFTA award-winning Tim Roth and produced by Kudos (Broadchurch, Humans and The Tunnel: Sabotage) , has already been confirmed. Tin Star season one debuts this Thursday.

All 10 episodes of Tin Star will be available from 7 Septemberon Sky Atlantic and Now TV.

Tin Star has been described as “a cross between Twin Peaks and Breaking Bad” by Sunday Times Culture, “a tale of corruption, murder, grief and all-consuming revenge” by Red magazine and an “epic new TV drama” by Empire. The series, penned by BAFTA award-winning writer and director Rowan Joffe (28 Weeks Later, The American), follows British police chief Jim Worth (Tim Roth) and his family as they desperately try to escape a past that unleashed an act of vicious revenge.

The first series of Tin Star explores just how
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘Tin Star’ Trailer: Tim Roth and Christina Hendricks Star in the New Amazon Series

  • Slash Film
‘Tin Star’ Trailer: Tim Roth and Christina Hendricks Star in the New Amazon Series
Tim Roth and Christina Hendricks are on the opposite sides of the law in a new upcoming Amazon series, Tin Star. The 10-part series was written and created by Rowan Joffe, the writer behind The American and co-writer of 28 Weeks Later. Joffe, who made his feature directorial debut with Brighton Rock, directs Roth and Hendricks in the pilot, which is about […]

The post ‘Tin Star’ Trailer: Tim Roth and Christina Hendricks Star in the New Amazon Series appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Turkish Casting Director Harika Uygur Wins Locarno’s European Casting Award

Turkish Casting Director Harika Uygur Wins Locarno’s European Casting Award
Locarno, Switzerland — Turkish casting director Harika Uygur is the winner of the Locarno Film Festival’s European Casting Award for her work on the ensemble cast of “Mustang,” director Deniz Gamze Erguven’s foreign-language Oscar-nominated debut about five sisters contending with conservative mores in contemporary rural Turkey.

Chemistry between the mostly previously unknown talented young actresses — Elit Iscan, Gunes Nezihe Sensoy, Doga Zeynep Doguslu, Ilayda Akdogan, and Tugba Sunguroglu, who also look alike – is considered crucial to making “Mustang” a breakout hit.

Uygur (pictured), who is the founder of an acting studio in Istanbul this year, became a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. She recently finished casting the Iraqui-Kurdish director’s “Lady Winsley,” a French, Turkish, Belgian co-production.

Uygur was voted the winner among 16 nominated casting directors by the 83 members of the International Casting Directors Network (Icdn), which represents casting directors in 24 countries.

The prize was awarded during a ceremony at Locarno
See full article at Variety - Film News »

My Country: Peter Nestler at the Film Society of Lincoln Center

  • MUBI
PachamamaBeginning Saturday, the Film Society of Lincoln Center is bringing to American shores the work of one of Germany’s finest filmmakers, Peter Nestler. Arranged in nine-parts, the extensive series is a major effort to make Nestler’s work better-known in the United States, where it has rarely shown. Nestler is a singular filmmaker, one for whom I have great affection, but also one who came to making films in a time and place singular in and of itself. The movies Germany produced for roughly the fifteen years after the reformation of the country after World War II is a period often misunderstood by cinephiles and, at least until recently, underrepresented in retrospective programming outside of the country itself. In the 1950s and 1960s, German leftists were outraged by the continuing presence of Nazis in the government of the young Federal Republic, and by the way that polite society did
See full article at MUBI »

‘Tin Star’ Trailer: Tim Roth and Christina Hendricks Star in Bloody New Revenge Series

‘Tin Star’ Trailer: Tim Roth and Christina Hendricks Star in Bloody New Revenge Series
Sky has released a first look teaser for its upcoming western “Tin Star.” The 10-part revenge drama series stars Tim Roth (“The Hateful Eight”) and Christina Hendricks (“Mad Men”).

Read More: The Best One-Season Wonder TV Shows That Never Got Renewed — IndieWire Critics Survey

The bloody drama is set in a remote Canadian mountain town, where the opening of a new oil refinery fronted by the mysterious Mrs. Bradshaw (Hendricks) introduces the small town to a world of drug-dealers, prostitution and organized crime. Police chief Jim Worth (Roth) is thirsty for revenge after the murder of a member of his family. The series is written by Rowan Joffe, whose credits include 2010’s “The American” and 2014’s “Before I Go to Sleep.” Marc Jobst and Gilles Bannier directed two episodes, and Grant Harvey and Rowan Joffe helmed one episode each.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 Premiere Review: David Lynch Remains a
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘Tin Star’ Trailer: Tim Roth and Christina Hendricks Star in Bloody New Revenge Series

  • Indiewire
‘Tin Star’ Trailer: Tim Roth and Christina Hendricks Star in Bloody New Revenge Series
Sky has released a first look teaser for its upcoming western “Tin Star.” The 10-part revenge drama series stars Tim Roth (“The Hateful Eight”) and Christina Hendricks (“Mad Men”).

Read More: The Best One-Season Wonder TV Shows That Never Got Renewed — IndieWire Critics Survey

The bloody drama is set in a remote Canadian mountain town, where the opening of a new oil refinery fronted by the mysterious Mrs. Bradshaw (Hendricks) introduces the small town to a world of drug-dealers, prostitution and organized crime. Police chief Jim Worth (Roth) is thirsty for revenge after the murder of a member of his family. The series is written by Rowan Joffe, whose credits include 2010’s “The American” and 2014’s “Before I Go to Sleep.” Marc Jobst and Gilles Bannier directed two episodes, and Grant Harvey and Rowan Joffe helmed one episode each.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’ Season 3 Premiere Review: David Lynch Remains a
See full article at Indiewire »

Amy Adams to Receive 2017 American Cinematheque Award

Amy Adams to Receive 2017 American Cinematheque Award
The American Cinematheque is presenting this year’s award to Amy Adams on Nov. 10 at The Beverly Hilton Hotel.

The American Cinematheque is extremely pleased to honor Amy Adams as the 31st recipient of the American Cinematheque award at our celebration this year,” said Rick Nicita, American Cinematheque Chairman. “Amy Adams is one of the most beloved, admired, and respected actresses in movies today.”

Related

Christian Bale, Steve Carell, and Amy Adams Circling Adam McKay’s Dick Cheney Biopic

Her credits range from critical favorites like ‘American Hustle’ and ‘Arrival’ to blockbusters like ‘Enchanted’ and ‘Man of Steel,’ combining strong reviews and commercial success. Her appeal crosses all demographic groups and she continues to broaden her audience with performances that illuminate her movie-star qualities. She has been honored with many nominations and awards from critics, fans and industry organizations all over the world. In the words of one of her directors,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Thekla Reuten Joins Jennifer Lawrence in Fox’s ‘Red Sparrow’ (Exclusive)

Thekla Reuten Joins Jennifer Lawrence in Fox’s ‘Red Sparrow’ (Exclusive)
Dutch actress Thekla Reuten has joined Jennifer Lawrence in the cast of Fox’s spy thriller “Red Sparrow,” which will be released on Nov. 10. Shooting is underway with Francis Lawrence directing.

The film, which also stars Joel Edgerton, Matthias Schoenaerts and Jeremy Irons, is based on Jason Matthews’ novel of the same name. Justin Haythe re-wrote the script, originally penned by Eric Warren Singer. Chernin Entertainment is producing.

The story follows a Russian intelligence officer (Lawrence) who is ordered against her will to become a “Sparrow,” a trained seductress, and to operate against a young CIA agent who handles the agency’s most important Russian mole.

According to a statement, “The two young intelligence officers fall into a spiral of attraction and deception that results in her leading life as a double agent.”

Reuten is a star in her native country having led two films to Academy Award nominations — “Everybody’s Famous!
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Drips, pop and Dollars: the music that made Ennio Morricone

At 88, Morricone is a towering presence in film history. As he celebrates 60 years in music, the Italian composer talks shoots, scores and the masterpieces we missed

Related: 'The American epic': Hollywood's enduring love for the western

In the extended title sequence of Sergio Leone’s epic 1968 western Once Upon a Time in the West, three vengeful-looking gunslingers await the arrival of the next train at the remote Cattle Corner Station. Not a word is shared between them. Instead, caught in vivid closeup like the lines ingrained on the weathered skin of their faces, it’s the sounds that tell a story: chalk screeches across a blackboard; water drips on to the brim of a hat and, in the dead stillness of the desert outside, a windpump gently squeaks. Even before knuckles are cracked, pistols are cocked and the man they’ve been waiting to kill announces his arrival with
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Movie industry reacts to Donald Trump victory

Movie industry reacts to Donald Trump victory
Harvey Weinstein, Guillermo del Toro, Jennifer Lawrence, Ken Loach, Shonda Rhimes among those to react.

A number of leading figures in the film and TV industries have responded with shock and dismay to the surprise win for Republican candidate Donald Trump in the Us presidential election this week.

Democrat nominee Hillary Clinton drew tens of millions of dollars in contributions from the entertainment industry during the heated contest. Opponent Trump received a fraction of that support.

Industry heavyweights to back Clinton’s campaign included senior figures from all six of Hollywood’s major studios while Harvey Weinstein, Legendary’s Thomas Tull and a number of top talent agent executives were also donors. Creatives to host events for Clinton included Scandal creator Shonda Rhimes and actors Leonardo DiCaprio and George Clooney.

Meanwhile, actors Stephen Baldwin, Steven Seagal and Kirstie Alley were among those to voice enthusiasm for the result.

Screen rounds up some of the reactions:

Harvey Weinstein, producer
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Accountant review

Maths and heavy artillery collide in The Accountant, starring Ben Affleck. Ryan reviews a very odd action-thriller...

Ben Affleck has officially hit the “injuring people with a bathroom sink” stage in his career. In the same year that brought us Affleck’s sinewy, glowering take on Batman, along comes The Accountant: a film in which he plays another multi-millionaire with a double life. Here, Affleck’s an indescribably tough mercenary who kills bad guys for his own, initially obscure ends - hence another moment involving a bathroom sink and a man’s skull.

See related Crazyhead episode 2 review: A Pine Fresh Scent Crazyhead episode 1 review: A Very Trippy Horse Buffy The Vampire Slayer: an episode roadmap for beginners Wolfblood: Buffy for the Cbbc generation

The twist in The Accountant is that Affleck’s hero Christian Wolff is also qualified to sort out your taxes, like Jack Reacher with a master's degree in bookkeeping.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Halloween 2016: 31 Movies to Stream on Netflix this October to Get You into the Spirit of the Season

  • DailyDead
One of my favorite things to do every October is to binge-watch as many horror and sci-fi movies as possible (something I can guarantee I’m not alone in doing), and for those of you with Netflix, the streaming service can be an invaluable resource this time of year, although I do remember a time when there were a lot more options than we get these days.

That being said, I culled Netflix's entire library and put together 31 great movie choices that will undoubtedly get you into a macabre mood to celebrate Halloween this year. Take a look at our Netflix list below, featuring one film for each day of October, and get ready to enjoy an entire month’s worth of fright-filled fun, courtesy of Netflix’s streaming database.

Creep (2014)

Looking for work, Aaron (Patrick Brice) comes across a cryptic online ad: “$1,000 for the day. Filming service. Discretion is appreciated.
See full article at DailyDead »

Preview of Vote Loki #4

The final issue of Vote Loki is out this coming Wednesday, and you can take a look at a preview right here courtesy of Marvel…

Election Day is upon us and Loki-mania has reached its height! The American people have spoken and They Want Loki. But Nisa’s not buying it. She had a bad feeling about Loki from the get go and she’s finally got proof that he’s up to no good. Too bad no one will listen. Bald Eagles! Odin bless the Troops! ‘Mericuh! Vote Loki!

Vote Loki #4 is out on September 21st, priced $3.99.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Thelma & Louise Ride Back into Cinemas August 21st and 24th

“You’ve always been crazy, this is just the first chance you’ve had to express yourself.”

Twenty-five years ago, in one of the greatest road movies of all time, Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon rode to everlasting fame as two women who embark on a crime spree across the American southwest in Thelma & Louise – and on Aug. 21 and 24, they’re journeying back to more than 500 movie theaters across the country.

For two days only at 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. local time, audiences can take the wild ride with Thelma (Geena Davis) and Louise (Susan Sarandon) all over again in a special Thelma & Louise 25th Anniversary celebration, presented by Fathom Events, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Park Circus. This special two-day-only event also includes an exclusive all-new introduction from movie critic Ben Lyons.

Tickets for the Thelma & Louise 25th Anniversary can be purchased online beginning Friday (July 22) by visiting www.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Locarno: Antoinette Boulat and Elsa Pharaon Win First European Casting Director Award

Locarno, Switzerland — The Locarno Film Festival’s innovative European Casting Director Award has spawned its first winner(s): France’s Antoinette Boulat and Elsa Pharaon for discovering first-timer Rod Paradot and casting him as the lead in Emmanuelle Bercot’s 2015 Cannes opening film “Standing Tall.”

Paradot’s performance as a turbulent teenager who repeatedly winds up in detention centers has drawn critical praise and scored him prizes as most promising French actor at both France’s Cesar and Lumiere awards this year.

The jury was made up by Swiss director Ursula Meier (“Sister”); prominent German producer Peter Rommel (“Wetlands”); and French actress Clotilde Courau (“In the Shadow of Women”).

Locarno’s new European casting director prize breaks new ground because there are virtually no nods for this key industry category within the global film community. Requests for a casting directors’ Oscar in the U.S. have fallen on deaf
See full article at Variety - Film News »

American Pastoral's Poster & Trailer Are A Beauty

Manuel here. American Pastoral, adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Philip Roth has a trio of leading performers that I find myself often rooting for—despite early buzzy career moves, each have become underrated and/or undervalued players: Jennifer Connelly, Dakota Fanning, and Ewan McGregor who's doing double duty here. American Pastoral marks his directorial debut.

I initially wanted to share the beautiful new poster for it which is haunting and simple; a perfect example of a one sheet that establishes quickly the mood of the piece. Roth's title and the film's tagline "A radically ordinary story" surely help. This is the American Dream engulfed in flames which means the nuclear family at the core of McGregor's film (Connelly playing his wife, Fanning his daughter) will be anything but ordinary.

And then I found the trailer had dropped and 30 seconds in I was already sold (which would've made a
See full article at FilmExperience »

Ewan McGregor Makes Directorial Debut In Trailer for Philip Roth Adaptation ‘American Pastoral’

It seems impossible, or maybe just stupid: adapt what is perhaps the most acclaimed novel by perhaps our greatest living novelist as your directorial debut, which you’ll also star in as a character with whom, based on the many and very critical descriptions from said most-acclaimed-novel-by-greatest-living-novelist, you don’t even have the greatest resemblance. Here we are, then, with Ewan McGregor‘s American Pastoral, an adaptation of Philip Roth‘s Pulitzer-winning, meta-fictional masterpiece of grieving, complex generational rifts, and glove-making — not exactly a Sundance-premiering dramedy.

I very much hope not to look like a fool in four months’ time when I say, now, that the first preview points towards something with character — perhaps rather good, even. Early days, yes (hence the disclaimer), yet this is a fine sampling of period-evoking design, shots and palette that evoke some sense of visual purpose — hello, The American and Control Dp Martin Ruhe — and,
See full article at The Film Stage »

13 great modern thriller directors

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They’ve made some of the best thrillers of the past six years. We list some of the best modern thriller directors currently working...

Director Guillermo del Toro once described suspense as being about the withholding of information: either a character knows something the audience doesn’t know, or the audience knows something the character doesn’t. That’s a deliciously simple way of describing something that some filmmakers often find difficult to achieve: keeping viewers on the edges of their seats.

The best thrillers leave us scanning the screen with anticipation. They invite us to guess what happens next, but then delight in thwarting expectations. We can all name the great thriller filmmakers of the past - Alfred Hitchcock, Carol Reed, Brian De Palma - but what about the current crop of directors? Here’s our pick of the filmmakers who’ve made some great modern thrillers over the past six years - that is, between the year 2010 and the present.

Jeremy Saulnier - Blue Ruin, Green Room

To think there was once a time when Jeremy Saulnier was seriously quitting the film business.

“To be honest," Saulner told us back in 2014, “Macon and I had really given up on our quest to break into the industry and become legitimate filmmakers. So what we were trying to do with Blue Ruin was archive our 20 year arc and bring it to a close. Really just revisit our stomping grounds and use locations that were near and dear to us and build a narrative out of that.”

Maybe this personal touch explains at least partly why Blue Ruin wound up getting so much attention in Cannes in 2013, signalling not the end of Saulnier and his star Macon Blair’s career, but a brand new chapter. But then again, there’s more than just hand-crafted intimacy in Saulnier’s revenge tale; there’s also its lean, minimal storytelling and the brilliance of its characterisation. Blue Ruin is such an effective thriller because its protagonist is so atypical: sad-eyed, inexperienced with guns, somewhat soft around the edges, Macon Blair’s central character is far from your typical righteous avenger.

Green Room, which emerged in the UK this year, explores a similar clash between very ordinary people and extraordinary violence. A young punk band shout about anarchy and aggression on stage, but they quickly find themselves out of their depth when they’re cornered by a group of bloodthirsty neo-Nazis. In Saulnier’s films, grubby, unseemly locations are matched by often beautiful locked-off shots. Familiar thriller trappings are contrasted by twists of fortune that are often shocking.

Denis Villeneuve - Sicario, Prisoners

Here’s one of those directors who can pack an overwhelming sense of dread in a single image: in Sicario, his searing drug-war thriller from last year, it was the sight of tiny specks of dust falling in the light scything through a window. That single shot proved to be the calm before the storm, as Villeneuve unleashed a salvo of blood-curdling events: an attempted FBI raid on a building gone horribly awry. And this, I think, is the brilliance of Villeneuve’s direction, and why he’s so good at directing thrillers like Sicario or 2013’s superb Prisoners - he understands the rhythm of storytelling, and how scenes of quiet can generate almost unbearable tension.

Another case in point: the highway sequence in Sicario, where Emily Blunt’s FBI agent is stuck in a traffic jam outside one of the most violent cities in the world. Villeneueve makes us feel the stifling heat and the claustrophobia; something nasty’s going to happen, we know that - but it’s the sense of anticipation which makes for such an unforgettable scene.

Prisoners hews closely to the template of a modern mystery thriller, but it’s once again enriched by Villeneuve’s expert pacing and the performances he gets out of his actors. Hugh Jackman’s seldom been better as a father on the hunt for his missing child, while Jake Gyllenhaal mesmerises as a cop scarred by his own private traumas.

Lynne Ramsay - We Need To Talk About Kevin

Ramsay’s We Need To Talk About Kevin may be the most effective psychological thriller of recent years. About the difficult relationship between a mother (Tilda Swinton) and her distant, possibly sociopathic son (Ezra Miller), Ramsay’s film is masterfully told from beginning to end - which is impressive, given that the source novel by Lionel Shriver is told via a series of letters. Ramsay takes the raw material from the book and crafts something cinematic and highly disturbing: a study of guilt, sorrow and recrimination. Tension bubbles even in casual conversations around the dinner table. Miller is an eerie, cold-eyed blank. Swinton is peerless. One scene, in which Swinton’s mother comes home in the dead of night, is unforgettable. Here’s hoping Ramsay returns with another feature film very soon.

Morten Tyldum - Headhunters

All kinds of thrillers have emerged from Scandinavia over the past few years, whether on the large or small screen or in book form. Morten Tyldum’s Headhunters is among the very best of them. The fast-paced and deliriously funny story of an art thief who steals a painting from the wrong guy, Headhunters launched Tyldum on an international stage - Alan Turing drama The Imitation Game followed, and the Sony sci-fi film Passengers is up next. It isn’t hard to see why, either: Headhunters shows off Tyldum’s mastery of pace and tone, as his pulp tale hurtles from intense chase scenes to laugh-out-loud black comedy.

Joel Edgerton - The Gift

Granted, Joel Edgerton’s better known as an actor, having turned in some superb performances in the likes of Warrior, Zero Dark Thirty and Warror. But with a single film - The Gift, which he wrote, directed, produced and starred in - Edgerton established himself as a thriller filmmaker of real promise. About a successful, happily married couple whose lives are greatly affected by an old face from the husband’s past, The Gift is an engrossing, unsettling movie with superb performances from Jason Bateman and Rebecca Hall as well as Edgerton.

A riff on the ‘killer in our midst’ thrillers of the 80s and 90s - The Stepfather, The Hand That Rocks The Cradle and so on - The Gift is all the more effective because of its restraint. We’re never quite sure who the villain of the piece is, at least at first - and Edgerton’s use of the camera leaves us wrong-footed at every turn. The world arguably needs more thrillers from Joel Edgerton.

If you haven’t seen The Gift yet, we’d urge you to track it down.

David Michod - Animal Kingdom

The criminals at play in this true-life crime thriller are all the more chilling because they’re so mundane - a bunch of low-level thieves, murderers and gangsters who prowl around the rougher parts of Melbourne, Australia. Writer-director David Michod spent years developing Animal Kingdom, and it was worth the effort: it’s an intense, engrossing film, for sure, but it’s also a believable glimpse of the worst of human nature. Ben Mendelsohn and Jacki Weaver play villains of different kinds; the latter a manipulative grandmother who looks over her brood of criminals, the former a spiteful thief. Crafting moments of incredible tension from simple exchanges, Michod launched himself as a formidable talent with this feature debut.

Ben Affleck - The Town, Argo

Affleck’s period drama-thriller Argo won all kinds of awards, but we’d argue his earlier thrillers were equally well made. Gone Baby Gone was a confident debut and an economical adaptation of Dennis LeHane’s novel. The Town, released in 2010, was a heist thriller that made the most of its Boston setting. One of its key scenes - a bank robbery in which the thieves wear a range of bizarre outfits, including a nun’s habit - is masterfully staged. With Affleck capable of teasing out great performances from his actors and staging effective set-pieces, it’s hardly surprising he’s so heavily involved in making at least one Batman movie for Warner - as well as playing the hero behind the mask.

Anton Corbijn - The American, A Most Wanted Man

The quiet, almost meditative tone of Anton Corbijn’s movies mean they aren’t necessarily to everyone’s taste, but they’re visually arresting and almost seductive in their rhythm and attention to detail. Already a celebrated photographer, Corbijn successfully crossed over into filmmaking with Control, an exquisitely-made drama about Joy Division lead singer Ian Curtis. Corbijn took a markedly different direction with The American, a thriller about an ageing contract killer (George Clooney) who hides out in a small Italian town west of Rome. Inevitably, trouble eventually comes calling.

Corbijn’s direction remains gripping because he doesn’t give us huge action scenes to puncture the tension. We can sense the capacity for violence coiled up beneath the hitman’s calm exterior, and Corbijn makes sure we only see rare flashes of that toughness - right up until the superbly-staged climax.

A Most Wanted Man, based on the novel by John le Carre, is a similarly astute study of an isolated yet fascinating character - in this instance, the world-weary German intelligence agent Gunther Bachmann, brilliantly played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Tragically, the film proved to be one of the last before Hoffman’s death in 2014.

Paul Greengrass - Green Zone, Captain Phillips

Mention Greengrass’ name, and the director’s frequent use of handheld cameras might immediately spring to mind. But time and again, Greengrass has proved a master of his own personal approach - you only have to look at the muddled, migraine-inducing films of his imitators to see how good a director Greengrass is. Part of the filmmakers’ visual language rather than a gimmick, Greengrass’ camera placement puts the viewer in the middle of the story, whether it’s an amnesiac agent on the run (his Bourne films) or on a hijacked aircraft (the harrowing United 93). While not a huge hit, Green Zone was an intense and intelligent thriller set in occupied Iraq. The acclaimed Captain Phillips, meanwhile, was a perfect showcase for Greengrass’ ability to fuse realism and suspense; the true story of a merchant vessel hijacked by Somali pirates, it is, to quote Greengrass himself, “a contemporary crime story.”

John Hillcoat - Lawless, Triple 9

We can’t help thinking that, with a better marketing push behind it, Triple 9 could have been a much bigger hit when it appeared in cinemas earlier this year. It has a great cast - Chiwetel Ejiofor, Norman Reedus, Anthony Mackie and Aaron Paul as a group of seasoned thieves, Kate Winslet cast against type as a gangland boss - and its heist plot rattles along like an express train.

Hillcoat seems to have the western genre pulsing through his veins, and he excels at creating worlds that are desolate and all-enveloping, whether his subjects are period pieces (The Proposition, Lawless) or post-apocalyptic dramas (The Road). Triple 9 sees Hillcoat make an urban western that is both classic noir and entirely contemporary; his use of real cops and residents around the film’s Atlanta location give his heightened story a grounding that is believable in the moment. Nowhere is this more in evidence than in the scene in which Casey Affleck’s cop breaches a building while hunkered down behind a bullet-proof shield. Hillcoat places us right there in the scene with Affleck and the cops sneaking into the building behind him; we sense the claustrophobia and vulnerability.

Hillcoat explained to us in February that this sequence wasn’t initially written this way in the original script; it changed when the director and his team discovered how real-world cops protect themselves in real-world situations. In Triple 9, research and great filmmaking combine to make an unforgettably intense thriller.

Jim Mickel - Cold In July

Seemingly inspired by such neo-Noir thrillers as Red Rock West and Blood Simple, 2014‘s Cold In July is a genre gem from director Jim Mickle (Stake Land, We Are What We Are). Michael C Hall plays an ordinary guy in 80s America who shoots an intruder who breaks into his home, and becomes drawn into a moody conspiracy that takes in crooked cops, porn and a private eye (who's also keen pig-rearer) played by Don Johnson. Constantly shifting between tones, Mickel’s thriller refuses to stick to genre expectations. In one scene, after Hall shoots the burglar dead, Mickel’s camera lingers over the protagonist as he cleans up the blood and glass. It’s touches like these that make Cold In July far more than a typical thriller.

Mickel’s teaming up with Sylvester Stallone next; we’re intrigued to see what that partnership produces.

Martin Scorsese - Shutter Island

As a filmmaker, Scorsese needs no introduction. As a director of thrillers, he’s in a class of his own: from Taxi Driver via the febrile remake of Cape Fear to the sorely underrated Bringing Out The Dead, his films are full of suspense and the threat of violence. Shutter Island, based on the Dennis LeHane novel of the same name, saw Scorsese plunge eagerly into neo-noir territory. A murder mystery set in a mental institution on the titular Shutter Island, its atmosphere is thick with menace. Like a combination of Robin Hardy's The Wicker Man and Adrian Lyne’s cult classic Jacob’s Ladder, Shutter Island’s one of those stories where we never know who we can trust - even the protagonist, played by Leonardo DiCaprio.

David Fincher - The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, Gone Girl

After the trial by fire that was Alien 3, David Fincher found his footing in the 90s with such hits as Seven and The Game. In an era where thrillers were in much greater abundance, from the middling to the very good, Seven in particular stood out as a genre classic: smartly written, disturbing, repulsive and yet captivating to look at all at once. Fincher’s affinity for weaving atmospheric thrillers continued into the 2010s, first with The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, a superb retelling of Stieg Larsson’s book which didn’t quite find the appreciative audience deserved, and Gone Girl, an even better movie which - thankfully - became a hit.

Based on Gillian Flynn’s novel (and adapted by the author herself), Gone Girl is both a gripping thriller and a thoroughly twisted relationship drama. Fincher’s mastery of the genre is all here: his millimetre-perfect composition, seamless touches of CGI and subtle yet effective uses of colour and shadow. While not a straight-up masterpiece like the period thriller Zodiac, Gone Girl is still a glossy, smart and blackly funny yarn in the Hitchcock tradition. If there’s one master of the modern thriller currently working, it has to be Fincher.

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