7.1/10
4,460
52 user 69 critic

Oranges and Sunshine (2010)

R | | Drama, History | 1 April 2011 (UK)
Trailer
2:17 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

Set in 1980s Nottingham, social worker Margaret Humphreys holds the British government accountable for child migration schemes and reunites the children involved -- now adults living mostly in Australia -- with their parents in Britain.

Director:

Writers:

, (book)
8 wins & 20 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Susie
Stuart Wolfenden ...
Bill
...
Federay Holmes ...
Charlotte
...
Merv
Molly Windsor ...
Rachel
...
Ben
Tammy Wakefield ...
Susan
...
Australia House Official (as Alastair Cummings)
Kate Rutter ...
Vera
...
Marg Downey ...
Miss Hutchison
Geoff Revell ...
Syd
Chrissie Page ...
Betty
Edit

Storyline

Set in 1980s Nottingham, social worker Margaret Humphreys holds the British government accountable for child migration schemes and reunites the children involved -- now adults living mostly in Australia -- with their parents in Britain.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A Tragedy That Spanned Decades - A Love That Crossed Continents - A Triumph That Changed Two Nations See more »

Genres:

Drama | History

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some strong language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

1 April 2011 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Laranjas e Sol  »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$4,500,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Based on true events, the real Margaret Humphreys was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia in 1993, and awarded Commander of the British Empire in 2011 for her work. See more »

Goofs

When Margaret is searching through the Public Records of Births and Marriages each entry gives full details, is handwritten, and sorted by town and presented in chronological order. In reality, to protect data they are single-line typed entries giving basics and references for obtaining full details, for anywhere in the country, and sorted alphabetically by surname for each quarter of the year. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Margaret Humphreys: So right now your baby needs to be safe, and you need a bit of support, don't you? I know you care, of course you do. But this will give you a chance to sort yourself out.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Ebert Presents: At the Movies: Episode #2.16 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Make It with Me
Composer John Moran
Publisher/Label KPM Music
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Britain's Shame
22 October 2011 | by See all my reviews

Should anyone ever question the value of the film industry then the innocently titled "Oranges and Sunshine" is a film that, on its own, could quite easily justify its existence.

Whilst the acting, production and direction are superb, the film's dark subject matter overshadows all, and its disturbing revelations require no dramatisation. As the psychological damage caused to a whole generation of "stolen" children becomes clear, it is difficult to comprehend the sheer immensity of the systematic betrayal of trust suffered by a staggering number of British families, and perpetrated by those in authority who should have known better.

"Oranges and Sunshine" covers a mere handful of tragic stories in various ways, all very effective. These stories expose a truly shameful episode in British history, and the way in which those affected adapted to their fate - with varying degrees of success. What is clear though is that for better or worse, this childhood experience has indelibly marked them for the rest of their lives.

Although the children who were torn away from their mothers may not have been marshalled roughly onto rail wagons, on a one way trip to oblivion, a very clear parallel can be drawn between the ghastly regime in Nazi Germany, and the ghastly regimes that allowed this despicable scheme to continue, and which do not appear, from the facts as depicted in this film, to have been brought to account.

The parallel is that when good men and women fall silent, and no-one challenges the systemic abuse of power by those in authority, then the arrogant, the incompetent, the weak-willed, the lazy and, indeed, the downright evil, triumph.

To me that is the enduring message of this brilliant yet incredibly sad film. It is a repeated lesson we seem incapable of learning, no matter how many times emotionally evocative films like this attempt to remind us.


20 of 20 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 52 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Best of 2017: Our Favorite Movie and TV Stills

Take a look at our favorite movie and TV stills from the past year. Spot any of your faves?

Browse the Best of 2017