6.5/10
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66 user 125 critic

Big Miracle (2012)

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2:33 | Trailer

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ON DISC
In small-town Alaska, a news reporter recruits his ex-girlfriend - a Greenpeace volunteer - on a campaign to save a family of gray whales trapped by rapidly forming ice in the Arctic Circle.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
John Pingayak ...
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John Chase ...
Roy
Ishmael Angalook Hope ...
Bud
Othniel 'Anaqulutuq' Oomittuk Jr. ...
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Maliaq Kairaiuak ...
Jeffrey Evan ...
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Randy Eledge ...
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Storyline

An animal-loving volunteer and a small-town news reporter are joined by a native Alaskan boy to rally an entire community - and eventually rival world superpowers - to save a family of majestic gray whales trapped by rapidly forming ice in the Arctic Circle. Written by Universal Pictures

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

3 February 2012 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Everybody Loves Whales  »

Box Office

Budget:

$40,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$7,760,205 (USA) (3 February 2012)

Gross:

$20,113,965 (USA) (30 March 2012)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to an article on the Greenpeace website, the Rachel Kramer character (Drew Barrymore) is based on Greenpeace wildlife campaigner, Cindy Lowry, who appears in the closing credits in archival footage. See more »

Goofs

When the Green Peace activist dives under the ice in a wetsuit, she has red thermal gloves on. While submerged and using her knife to cut away the net on the baby whale's fluke, her bare hands are visible. When she surfaces, the red gloves are back on again. See more »

Quotes

Adam Carlson: [Rachel approaches the hole in the ice for the first time; one whale pokes it's head out of the water] Rachel, I'd like you to meet Fred.
Rachel Kramer: Hi Fred!
Adam Carlson: [second whale pops up] ... and Wilma.
Rachel Kramer: Good morning, Wilma! You're beautiful!
Adam Carlson: [third whale, the baby, comes up] And this, is Bam Bam!
Adam Carlson: Hi Bam Bam! Wait... wasn't Pebbles Fred and Wilma's kid?
Adam Carlson: Yeah, but Pebbles was also a girl.
See more »

Crazy Credits

At the very end of the credits, when the Working Title logo appears, we hear the songs of the whales. See more »

Connections

Featured in Chelsea Lately: Episode #6.20 (2012) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
We liked it!
4 February 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This is a slow movie. Prepare to watch people standing around a hole in the ice. If you think gray whales are a waste of time, you won't be moved. On the other hand, if you can pull for a family of marine mammals in danger of freezing to death, you will probably find satisfaction in this movie's numerous charms. You'll enjoy the dignity given to the Inuit people, environmentalists, oil executives, Soviets, journalists, and even Republicans(!) who collaborate in dramatic efforts to save the trapped whales. You'll appreciate the care taken with a late 80's period piece, down to the silk blouses, big glasses, hair, and Peter Jennings. You may even be moved by the warm and unguarded performances of Drew Berrymore, John Kasinksi, and others.

It's possible you may have your heart enlarged by the uncommon efforts of truly diverse people on behalf of beautiful and vulnerable earthlings like the grays. There is an unabashed love for both the whales and the humans portrayed in this movie, whose lives and futures are at stake in a variety of ways. Some may regard this affection as sentimentality, but the sense of humor sustained throughout the film argues against this. Somehow I think the worst-ever portrayal of Ronald Reagan was hardly unintentional. This director definitely has it in for for Minnesotans, too.

My ten and thirteen year-old sons were engrossed by this true story brought to the screen and gave it two thumbs up. My wife and I enjoyed being unembarrassed in their presence throughout.

Simply as an introduction to Barrow, Alaska, the movie is totally worthwhile.

My biggest complaint: Drew Barrymore's lips should be blue when scuba diving in frigid Artic waters.


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