(2013)

Critic Reviews

60

Metascore

Based on 43 critic reviews provided by Metacritic.com
80
The Wolverine boasts one of the best pulp-inspired scripts yet. It's still full of corny dialogue...but there's a genuine elegance to the way it establishes Logan's tortured condition and slowly brings the character around to recovering his heroic potential, methodically setting up and paying off ideas as it unfolds.
75
Apart from Khodchenkova, who displays the acting acumen of a runway model and gives new meaning to the term Russian mole (she's the villainous vixen of the tale, suited up in high heels and slinky, scaly couture), the cast of The Wolverine is uniformly good.
75
The Wolverine shows that, while originality would be nice, a little novelty and enthusiasm in the presentation of the familiar can be quite enough.
75
It's simply a more focused scenario than usual, full of violence done up with a little more coherence and visceral impact than usual.
75
Jackman spends enough time compellingly playing stranger in a strange land that you'll put up with a few unwanted doses of the old familiar.
75
Finally - a superhero movie that doesn't feel like every other superhero movie.
75
The Wolverine is one of the better comic-book movies of 2013, thanks in large part to an electric performance by Hugh Jackman.
63
This Wolverine gets our hopes up, and falls short.
63
This may be the year's best superhero movie because, for a sufficient amount of time, it doesn't feel like a superhero movie at all.
63
This pissed-off man of Adamantium claws is stalking new ground (Japan), and his fight with yakuza on top of Tokyo's speeding bullet train is a wowser.
63
I liked that The Wolverine (which saves a nifty twist for a surprise scene in the middle of the end credits) turns down the volume on the usual din of colliding mutant superpowers.
63
An intermittently exciting action film anchored by a strong performance by Jackman, who embodies Wolverine like no one else could.
60
An improvement on the last outing for Jackman's not-so-merry mutant. If only it trusted enough in its unique setting to forgo a descent into aggressively awful formula.
60
It's a step up from the garbled silliness of Wolverine's first solo outing. Unlike Origins, the storytelling is more sharply focused here, ignited by flashes of stylised superheroism.
60
Until a third act that collapses in a harebrained heap, the director largely succeeds in keeping the more cartoonish aspects at bay, roughing up the surface with organically staged fight scenes and, crucially, raising the stakes by stripping his hitherto indestructible hero of his self-healing powers.
50
I'd like to credit Mangold, along with writers Christopher McQuarrie, Mark Bomback and Scott Frank for their good intentions; the smaller scope and lighter tone of their film is a tonic after bloated doom and gloom of "Man of Steel."
40
The previous X-Men film, First Class, was secure enough in its own skin to embrace its comic side. Mangold's picture affects a pubescent snarl instead: that's the difference between comic and daft.
40
The flat hammerblows of The Wolverine bear little relation to the zing and pop of Matthew Vaughn's colourful treatment. Inconsistency is inevitable in a world that's constantly being dug up and done over, but it leaves us no time to fall in love with anything being flung at us.
40
This turgid return papers over the previous film's narrative, but creates little in the way of a fresh character arc.
40
Good thing the Aussie star has the role down to a science, since the rest of The Wolverine is a howler.
31
The Wolverine reveals itself to be a film in desperate need of a point, in dire need of consequences and in a wandering search of any semblance of emotional weight.

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