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A History of Israeli Cinema (2009)

Historia Shel Hakolnoah Israeli (original title)
Not Rated | | Documentary | 2009 (Israel)
The first 1933 - 1978 starts with the Zionist movement and ends with the first re-visitation of that history. The second 1978 - 2005 starts at the beginning of the political wave until the ... See full summary »

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1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
...
(as Mohammed Bakri)
Shmulik Duvdevani
Nurit Gertz
Amir Harel
Avraham Heffner
Nachman Ingber ...
Himself
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Storyline

The first 1933 - 1978 starts with the Zionist movement and ends with the first re-visitation of that history. The second 1978 - 2005 starts at the beginning of the political wave until the more recent personal cinema. However chronological, both episodes cover most of the genres, themes and periods of Israeli cinema - from the beginning of the Zionist Mouvement to the most personal stories - from commercial to politically engaged directors, from the local to the universal. A HISTORY OF ISRAELI CINEMA tells the story of the building of a gaze on a society torn by ethnics, religious, and political conflicts. It attempts to understand, to denounce or to explore this complex subjects, always searching for the right ethic, the right form: to explore or transform its own definition and its place in the world. Written by Zadig Production

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Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated
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Release Date:

2009 (Israel)  »

Also Known As:

A History of Israeli Cinema  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(2 parts)

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Features They Were Ten (1961) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Israeli cinema has a prehistory and a history in its own right
18 May 2009 | by (France) – See all my reviews

Raphael Nadjari's 3-hour documentary was a big surprise to me. It revealed a hidden part of Israeli cinema, with a lot of 'moving' images predating the creation of the country in 1948, and many movies having nothing to do with the country's wars and conflicts. I came out of it with a craving for more, David Perlov's Diary for instance. Nadjari artfully managed to negotiate its way between common obstacles when it comes to Israel, I mean the self-flagellation or soothing discourses. Also I very much appreciated the comments on movie excerpts made by experienced Israeli academics: Israeli cinema has a prehistory and a history in its own right.


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