7.3/10
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87 user 193 critic

Barney's Version (2010)

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The picaresque and touching story of the politically incorrect, fully lived life of the impulsive, irascible and fearlessly blunt Barney Panofsky.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 18 wins & 18 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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O'Malley Director #1
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T / U Productions Executive #1
David Pryde ...
T / U Productions Executive #2
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Bartender at Grumpy's
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Marica Pellegrinelli ...
'The Countess'
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Leo
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Domenico Minutoli ...
Judge at Rome Wedding
Massimo Wertmüller ...
Rome Doctor (as Massimo Wertmuller)
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Storyline

Take a ride through the life and memories of Barney Panofsky, a hard-drinking, cigar-smoking, foulmouthed 65-year old hockey fanatic and television producer, as he reflects on his life's successes and (numerous) gaffes and failures as the final chapters of his own existence come sharply into focus. Written by Production

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

First he got married. Then he got married again. Then he met the love of his life.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

18 February 2011 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Minha Versão do Amor  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$65,241 (USA) (14 January 2011)

Gross:

$7,501,404 (USA) (17 June 2011)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Four noted Canadian film directors make cameo appearances in the film. We see Atom Egoyan as a director of O'Malley of the North, Ted Kotcheff as the conductor on the train, David Cronenberg as another of O'Malley's directors, and Denys Arcand as the head waiter at the Ritz. And, although better known for their acting, Paul Gross and Saul Rubinek are also movie directors. See more »

Goofs

During Blair's discussion of the future of veganism over dinner he ponders whether one should say "in less than 50 years" or "in fewer than 50 years". He incorrectly settles on "fewer" reasoning that you're counting years and not measuring time. A ten-year calendar has fewer than 50 years on it, but something that will come to pass sooner than 50 years from now will do so in less than 50 years. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Blair: Hello?
Barney Panofsky: Blair, I'd like to speak with my wife.
Blair: Oh, Barney, it's 3:00 in the morning.
Barney Panofsky: Put my wife on the phone.
Blair: She's not your wife and I'm not waking her.
Barney Panofsky: All right. Well, then just ask her what she wants me to do with all these nude photos I have of her. Ah, come to think of it, you actually might want them, if only to see what Miriam looked like in her prime.
Blair: [hangs up]
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Connections

References Due South (1994) See more »

Soundtracks

I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore
Written by Randy Newman
Performed by Shelby Lynne
Courtesy of Lost Highway Records
Under license Universal Music Enterprises
Used by permission of EMI UNART CATALOG Inc.
All rights reserved
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User Reviews

 
An imperfect life perfectly told...
13 February 2011 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

Giamatti has got to be the plainest looking leading man out there; yet, his acting ability transcends his anti-matinée idol physiognomy by a significant amount. And, remembering "Sideways," there is nobody who can play a guy half-in-the-bag nearly as well. HIs facial expressions, comic timing, and the way in which he delivers his lines are just brilliant (and if you think he can only do comic turns, see HBO's "John Adams"). Yet, every scene that he was in with Dustin Hoffman, Hoffman stole! The director (Richard J. Lewis) is able to get everything from this very talented cast, and puts together a movie that never drags, is easy to follow even though it uses the flashback, and is punctuated with several laugh-out-louds.

Giamatti's character--although a cad in some ways--manages to also be quite endearing, and character development in the whole movie is excellent. We know these people...some of them are in our family, some are friends or perhaps, live next door. To be sure, there is a Jewish aspect to the individuals and story (it's pretty hard to divorce that aspect from anything Richler has written), but all the issues are universal. If Woody Allen had done this movie, there would have been endless navel gazing, and the characters would have been more 2-dimensional (just a mind game I played since the characters and the themes are similar to those that The Woodman deals with).

At any rate, this is a brilliantly constructed examination of a life that is enjoyable and entertaining; also, a great movie to see and have dinner afterwards so all those who saw it with you could discuss--a lot of meat for that. But, if it's not on a big screen within 30 miles of you, it will play very well on the small screen in a few months; but certainly go out of your way to see it.


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