Solidarity thrived in Poland; Soviets faced military pressure in Afghanistan, but Congress cut funding for Nicaragua. In 1986 Reagan met Mikhail Gorbachev, but missile reduction talks ... See full summary »

Writer:

Reviews

Watch Now

From $1.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode credited cast:
...
Himself / Narrator
Edit

Storyline

Solidarity thrived in Poland; Soviets faced military pressure in Afghanistan, but Congress cut funding for Nicaragua. In 1986 Reagan met Mikhail Gorbachev, but missile reduction talks failed over SDI research. The Iran-Contra scandal broke. Gorbachev signed a missile reduction treaty. Reagan visited Moscow in 1988, but his dream of ending the Soviet Union came after retirement in 1989. Soon after, he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. This is the third of four parts. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Release Date:

24 February 1998 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Not perfect....
29 October 2011 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

Part Two features Ronald Reagan's Cold War policy with the Soviet Union--including SDI, arms control and his assertion that the Soviet Union was 'an evil empire'. In addition, Iran-Contra, positive and negative aspects of the second term and his later years are discussed. Several of Reagan's children (but, oddly, not Michael) and Nancy are interviewed as are many in politics and the media. In addition, various film clips and photos are used as well as nice narration by David Ogden Stiers--who often narrates episodes of "The American Experience".

This is one of the best biographies of Ronald Reagan. Now I am not saying it's perfect. As some have pointed out, it does appear to have a slight bias against him. Mostly Part Two focused on the failures of Reagan's second administration. Some was deserved (such as Iran-Contra) and some seemed less deserved (such comments as his treatment of the Soviets). However, considering how unpopular Reagan was with most of the media during his presidency, this isn't really surprising. What is actually surprising is how after the death of Reagan, folks began talking about him very positively and with nostalgia--and many were the same folks who detested him as President. Odd how time often changes perceptions.

Overall, not as horribly biased as some reviewers have stated but clearly a film that offers more criticism than praise.


0 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?