The lead singer of a 60s rock band who is believed to have committed suicide 35 years earlier suddenly materializes and wants to reorganize the group.

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(inspired by the Inspector Morse novels of), (story) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
Declan
Paul Panting ...
Craig Bell
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Lucas (as Thomas Kane)
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Kitten
...
...
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Trevor Byfield ...
Bone (as Zig Byfield)
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Esmé Ford
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Jessica Manley ...
Jo
Renee Montemayor ...
Jacinta
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Franco
Philip Correia ...
Concierge
...
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Storyline

Thirty-five years after she supposedly drowned herself, rock star Esme Ford returns to Oxford to secretly re-establish her band Midnight Addiction with former members Richie, Mack and Franco. The secrecy extends to the band's reaction when an orphaned teenage boy is killed outside Richie's house. Then ex-roadie Bone and Richie's daughter's music tutor, who used to write the band's sleeve-notes, are also murdered. Midnight Addiction may well once have been the real thing but several people are definitely not what they first seem to be. Written by don @ minifie-1

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Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

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Details

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Release Date:

29 August 2010 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (video release) | (11 episodes)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jane Bertish and Trevor Byfield have appeared in both Inspector Morse and the spin off Lewis. See more »

Goofs

At about 1 hour 28 min, Richie Maguire and DI Robert Lewis are conversing next to a police "panda car". In the shots where the camera is facing Richie Maguire, the antenna is in the vertical position; when the camera is facing DI Robert Lewis, it's laid horizontally on the roof. This is also a factual error because that type of antenna is for window glass mounting only. It cannot operate through a metal car roof, as it is seen. See more »

Quotes

Chief Superintendent Jean Innocent: So what are you actually going to do, Lewis, now?
DI Robert Lewis: Now, ma'am? I'm going o think.
Chief Superintendent Jean Innocent: You're going to think?
DI Robert Lewis: Yeah, ma'am. As a means of solving a crime it can prove useful.
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Connections

References Frankenstein (1931) See more »

Soundtracks

When I Get My Business Fixed
(credited)
Composed by Barrington Pheloung and Bernie Holland
Performed by Maggie Bell
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User Reviews

 
'Lewis' and the 60s rock band
10 June 2017 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

Hearing about 'Lewis' for the first time when it first started, there was a big touch of excitement seeing as 'Inspector Morse' was and still is one of my favourites but also a little intrepidation, wondering whether the series would be as good. The good news is, like the prequel series 'Endeavour', 'Lewis' is every bit as good as 'Inspector Morse' and stands very well on its own two feet as a detective mystery and show in general.

As said a number of times already, 'Lewis' started off very promising with the pilot and Season 1. It was with Season 2 where 'Lewis' hit its stride with things generally feeling more settled. Season 3 started off disappointingly with "Allegory of Love", which to me wasn't that bad but compared to the high calibre of the best episodes it could have been much better. "The Quality of Mercy" was a superior effort and saw the show back on track. "The Point of Vanishing" was a return to relative disappointment, but "Counter Culture Blues" is one of the season's better episodes generally.

Maybe parts and some unanswered questions could have been better explained. While not convoluted or bizarre, the ending needed more clarity and more explanation generally. Also found the truth guessable before the final solution.

On the other hand, the acting is fine, anchored by Kevin Whately and Laurence Fox. Whately is again very good and carries the episode with aplomb, advantaged by that Lewis is much more developed and as said he has more development. Clare Holman adds a lot. Fox is a breath of fresh air in a great contrasting role that reminds one of a more intelligent Lewis in his younger days and his sparkling sparring chemistry with Whately is a big part of the episode's, and show's, appeal. Innocent has more to do and is more commanding, her character not as problematic as in the pilot and Season 1. Joanna Lumley is excellent in one of the show's best supporting turns.

Production values are of very high quality. It's beautifully shot (some of the best of the show at this point), and Oxford not only looks exquisite but is like a supporting character in itself. Barrington Pheloung returns as composer, and does a first-rate job. The theme tune, while not as iconic or quite as clever as Morse's, is very pleasant to listen to, the episode is charmingly and hauntingly scored and the use of pre-existing music is very well-incorporated.

There is some fun and thought-provoking writing, especially between Lewis and Hathaway, and the rock and roll setting is very well done. The chemistry between Lewis and Esme was also strong.

In summary, good and one of Season 3's better episodes let down by the underdeveloped ending and a few things that could have been made clearer. 8/10 Bethany Cox


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