Frontier life was hazardous. Affording, as it did, a safe retreat for criminals of all countries, the honest pioneers were compelled to punish crimes summarily in order to check the ... See full summary »

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Frontier life was hazardous. Affording, as it did, a safe retreat for criminals of all countries, the honest pioneers were compelled to punish crimes summarily in order to check the recklessness of the desperadoes with which the west was infested. Slight circumstances oft times sent a man to his doom, and in this swift meeting of justice the innocent frequently suffered. This playlet shows the narrow escape of a man and woman from the avenging hands of cowboys who thought them guilty. Two cowboys who have imbibed freely and unwisely, meet a pretty little Indian girl fishing. Bob tries to kiss her while Jack looks on and laughs. The girl struggles with Bob and becoming alarmed at his boisterous attentions strikes him with a large stick. As he falls unconscious to the ground Jack rushes toward her but she holds him at bay with the club. At this moment the girl's Indian sweetheart arrives on the scene and leaps upon the white man who draws a knife. A terrific struggle ensues and the ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Western

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9 September 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Will not be wholly flattering to the white men
23 August 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A frontier picture presenting scenes which might easily have occurred in very many places. The most attractive feature of this one is where the Indian and the maiden escape from the hands of the men who would have lynched them. Of course it was all right for white men to insult an Indian girl. What right had an Indian girl to have any feeling about such things anyhow? But when she defended herself, assisted by her lover, then there was trouble and the whole settlement turned out to lynch them. Fortunately they escaped. Perhaps the producer unwittingly gave a truer picture than he intended. He may have shown why some of the difficulties between the whites and Indians began. The scene affords opportunity for the imagination to perform its part and the conclusions will not be wholly flattering to the white men. - The Moving Picture World, September 24, 1910


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