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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 78 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Knight of Cups,’ ‘Midnight Special,’ ‘Embrace of the Serpent,’ and More

21 June 2016 7:56 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Embrace of the Serpent (Ciro Guerra)

With its focus on the effects of exploration by white men on foreign lands, Ciro Guerra’s Oscar-nominated Embrace of the Serpent will inevitably be compared to Werner Herzog’s stories of savage nature, and while Guerra is investigating some of Herzog’s most well trodden themes, the chaos of man exists in the background, while the unspoiled sit front and center here. Embrace of the Serpent centers on two explorers, separated by decades in time, »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ’10 Cloverfield Lane, ’45 Years,’ ‘La Chienne,’ and More

14 June 2016 6:43 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

10 Cloverfield Lane (Dan Trachtenberg)

Forget the Cloverfield connection. The actors who were in this film didn’t even know what the title was until moments before the first trailer dropped. Producer J.J. Abrams used that branding as part of the wrapping for its promotional mystery box, but the movie stands perfectly alone from 2008’s found-footage monster picture. Hell, 10 Cloverfield Lane perhaps doesn’t even take place within the same fictional universe as that film — although a friend asked if it’s secretly a Super 8 sequel, and, honestly, you could think of it as one without contradicting anything in either movie. Whether the Cloverfield name fills you with wariness or enthusiasm, it would be unwise to burden Dan Trachtenberg‘s film with such prejudices. – Dan S. (full review)

45 Years (Andrew Haigh)

Andrew Haigh’s third feature as a director, 45 Years, is an excellent companion piece to its 2011 predecessor, Weekend. The latter examined the inception of a potential relationship between two men over the course of a weekend, whereas its successor considers the opposite extreme. Again sticking to a tight timeframe, the film chronicles the six days leading up to a couple’s 45th wedding anniversary. Though highly accomplished, Weekend nevertheless suffered from a tendency towards commenting on itself as a gay issues film, which at times overrode the otherwise compelling realism. Despite treating material arguably even more underrepresented in cinema – senior relationships – Haigh avoids this same self-reflexive pitfall in 45 Years, pulling off an incisive and emotionally ensnaring tour de force. – Giovanni M.C. (full review)

Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Alexander Hall)

A sophisticated supernatural Hollywood comedy whose influence continues to be felt, Here Comes Mr. Jordan stars the eminently versatile Robert Montgomery as a working-class boxer and amateur aviator whose plane crashes in a freak accident. He finds himself in heaven but is told, by a wry angel named Mr. Jordan (Claude Rains), that his death was a clerical error, and that he can return to Earth by entering the body of a corrupt (and about-to-be-murdered) financier—whose soul could use a transplant. Nominated for seven Oscars (it won two) and the inspiration for a sequel with Rita Hayworth and two remakes, Alexander Hall’s effervescent Here Comes Mr. Jordan is comic perfection. – Criterion.com

La Chienne (Jean Renoir)

Jean Renoir’s ruthless love triangle tale, his second sound film, is a true precursor to his brilliantly bitter The Rules of the Game, displaying all of the filmmaker’s visual genius and fully imbued with his profound humanity. Michel Simon cuts a tragic figure as an unhappily married cashier and amateur painter who becomes so smitten with a prostitute that he refuses to see the obvious: that she and her pimp boyfriend are taking advantage of him. Renoir’s elegant compositions and camera movements carry this twisting narrative—a stinging commentary on class and sexual divisions—to an unforgettably ironic conclusion. – Criterion.com

Also Arriving This Week

Eddie the Eagle (review)

Hello, My Name is Doris (review)

Get a Job (review)

Gold

Recommended Deals of the Week

Top Deal: A selection of Clint Eastwood and Steven Spielberg Blu-rays are under $10 this week.

All the President’s Men (Blu-ray) – $7.79

The American (Blu-ray) – $6.68

Amelie (Blu-ray) – $8.99

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Beginners (Blu-ray) – $6.11

Bone Tomahawk (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Brothers Bloom (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Cabin in the Woods (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Casino (Blu-ray) – $9.49

The Conformist (Blu-ray) – $14.49

Cloud Atlas (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Crimson Peak (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Dear White People (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Deer Hunter (Blu-ray) – $10.61

Eastern Promises (Blu-ray) – $8.57

Ex Machina (Blu-ray) – $8.00

The Grand Budapest Hotel (Blu-ray) – $5.99

The Guest (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Hail, Caesar! (Blu-ray) – $12.99

Heat (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Holy Motors (Blu-ray) – $10.59

The Informant! (Blu-ray) – $8.07

Inglorious Basterds (Blu-ray) – $4.99

Interstellar (Blu-ray) – $5.00

The Iron Giant (Blu-ray pre-order) – $9.99

Jaws (Blu-ray) – $7.88

John Wick (Blu-ray) – $8.00

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (Blu-ray) – $9.69

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter (Blu-ray) – $9.89

The Lady From Shanghai (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Looper (Blu-ray) – $7.88

Lost In Translation (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Macbeth (Blu-ray) – $11.99

Mad Max: Fury Road (Blu-ray) – $10.00

Magic Mike Xxl (Blu-ray) – $11.99

Magnolia (Blu-ray) – $9.19

The Man Who Wasn’t There (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Margaret (Blu-ray) – $9.49

Martha Marcy May Marlene (Blu-ray) – $6.99

The Master (Blu-ray) – $12.69

Michael Clayton (Blu-ray) – $7.98

Nebraska (Blu-ray) – $9.35

Never Let Me Go (Blu-ray) – $7.99

No Country For Old Men (Blu-ray) – $5.99

Non-Stop (Blu-ray) – $8.99

Obvious Child (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Pan’s Labyrinth (Blu-ray) – $7.99

ParaNorman (Blu-ray) – $7.98

Pariah (Blu-ray) – $9.98

Persepolis (Blu-ray) – $5.79

Prisoners (Blu-ray) – $10.49

Pulp Fiction (Blu-ray) – $8.48

Raging Bull: 30th Anniversary Edition (Blu-ray) – $10.19

Re-Animator (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Rio Bravo (Blu-ray) – $5.99

Road to Perdition (Blu-ray) – $8.99

The Searchers / Wild Bunch / How the West Was Won (Blu-ray) – $10.36

Sex, Lies, and Videotape (Blu-ray) – $5.88

Short Term 12 (Blu-ray) – $9.89

Shutter Island (Blu-ray) – $6.79

A Separation (Blu-ray) – $6.80

A Serious Man (Blu-ray) – $7.22

A Single Man (Blu-ray) – $6.00

The Social Network (Blu-ray) – $9.96

Spotlight (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Steve Jobs (Blu-ray) – $9.99

Straight Outta Compton (Blu-ray) – $10.00

Synecdoche, NY (Blu-ray) – $6.89

There Will Be Blood (Blu-ray) – $8.20

They Came Together (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Tree of Life (Blu-ray) – $6.99

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (Blu-ray) – $5.52

Volver (Blu-ray) – $5.95

Where the Wild Things Are (Blu-ray) – $7.99

Whiplash (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Witch (Blu-ray) – $14.96

The Wrestler (Blu-ray) – $7.00

See all Blu-ray deals.

What are you picking up this week?

»

- The Film Stage

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Teaser For Korean Disaster Film Tunnel: A Terrifying Trap

9 June 2016 1:00 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

Director Kim Seong-hun (whose 2014 film A Hard Day has become part of the great pantheon of Korean crime thrillers) is back this year with a disaster film, Tunnel, and a new poster and the first teaser have been released. One of our Korean film expert Pierce Conran's most anticipated titles of the year, Tunnel features an all-star cast of heavyweight actors, certainly known to Korean cinephiles audiences: Bae Doo-na (Cloud Atlas, A Girl At My Door), Ha Jung-woo (The Yellow Sea, The Handmaiden), and Oh Dal-su (Veteran, Assassination). A man is on his way home to his family, when the badly-constructed tunnel he is driving through collapses, leaving him trapped. With draining battery power and a rescue effort that might end before it locates...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Hail, Caesar!,’ ‘Anomalisa,’ ‘Le Amiche,’ and More

7 June 2016 6:38 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Anomalisa (Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson)

Charlie Kaufman, the writer behind Being John Malkovich and Adaptation, teams up with animator Duke Johnson to create a complex emotional drama starring lifelike puppets. The premise is riddled with existential dread of modern-day life, presented uniquely through Kaufman’s idiosyncratic point-of-view. For protagonist and self-help author Michael Stone (voiced soulfully by David Thewlis), everyone around him has the same voice (thanks to Tom Noonan) and nothing feels right. It isn’t »

- The Film Stage

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Video Game Review – Soul Axiom

7 June 2016 4:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Martin Carr reviews Soul Axiom…

Hours of wandering around in a Tron induced landscape is not for everyone. Being dropped into a scenario where electrical lightning storms, mountainous peaks and huge charging pillions dominate might put some off. Similarly not really having any instructions might also be considered by some to be a hindrance. If any of the above applies to you then Soul Axiom is best avoided.

What Wales Interactive have done with this game, which has been out on PC for some time, is create something visually unique. An experience capable of dividing many, yet guaranteed to recruit more than its fair share of devotees. Soul Axiom finds you wandering around an uncharted landscape, which seems to exist within your head. An afterlife experience set within the realms of a digitally created domain that has great potential.

Construction and deconstruction are the order of this particular day, which »

- Amie Cranswick

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Feed the Beast Premiere: Did David Schwimmer's AMC Drama Satisfy?

5 June 2016 8:07 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

A coke addicted ex-con with a brutally mangled pinkie finger and an alcoholic widower with a son who refuses to speak decide to open a restaurant in the Bronx. Only one of ’em knows the business will be a front for a mobster with a penchant for forcibly removing people’s teeth with a pair of pliers.

Welcome to Feed the Beast — David Schwimmer‘s new AMC drama that couldn’t be farther from Central Perk if Ross Geller had lived in a run-down studio on the outskirts of Queens and never uttered a single zinger in his tragedy-strewn life. »

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'Feed the Beast': Everything You Need to Know

3 June 2016 8:51 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Ever since AMC debuted Mad Men in July of 2007, TV aficionados have learned to keep an eye on what the channel slips onto the air during the dog days. Past summers have brought the likes of Humans and Halt and Catch Fire; the same time frame also brought us Rubicon, because hey, nobody's perfect. This year's contender for possible out-of-left-field Mvp is Feed the Beast: a drama about crime and cuisine starring Jim Sturgess as a coked-up ex-con chef and David Schwimmer as his morose sommelier best friend. Developed »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: Wim Wenders, ‘City of Women,’ ‘Horse Money,’ and More

31 May 2016 8:06 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

City of Women (Federico Fellini)

Federico Fellini‘s epic 1980 fantasia introduced the start of the Maestro’s delirious late period. A surrealist tour-de-force filmed on soundstages and locations alike, and overflowing with the same sensory (and sensual) invention heretofore found only in the classic movie-musicals (and Fellini’s own oeuvre), La città delle donne [City of Women] taps into the era’s restless youth culture, coalescing into nothing less than Fellini’s post-punk opus. Marcello Mastroianni appears as Fellini’s alter »

- The Film Stage

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Here's Why Matrix 4 Probably Won't Happen

30 May 2016 12:18 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

While The Matrix arrived in 1999 as one of the biggest movies of that year, changing the VFX game and becoming a true phenomenon, its sequels aren't as fondly remembered. It's been 13 years since fans sighed a bit of disappointment at 2003's trilogy ending sequel The Matrix Revolutions. And if you were hoping that Warner Bros. was getting ready to revisit the franchise any time soon, righting some of the wrongs the series made, as other long-awaited sequels have done, you can scratch that thought from your head.

Original Matrix producer Joel Silver has been making the press rounds in support of his latest movie The Nice Guys. And he candidly opened up about the possibility of continuing the Matrix franchise. It's not being planned at the moment. And it probably won't happen for a long, long time. So long, in fact, that we'll probably see a remake instead of a sequel. »

- MovieWeb

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Wonder Woman Makes History As One Of The Few Female-Directed Films With A $100 Million + Budget

26 May 2016 7:23 AM, PDT | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

The upcoming Wonder Woman film has had plenty of buzz after a mostly positive reception to the character upon the release of Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice. Not only will Wonder Woman be the first female-led superhero movie in over twelve years, but it has also set a new milestone, joining the club as one of the few films with a $100 million budget to be helmed by a female director (in this case Patty Jenkins). Other movies on this list include K-19: The Widowmaker (directed by Kathryn Bigelow) and Jupiter Ascending and Cloud Atlas (co-directed by Lana Wachowski). The Dceu adaptation was discussed at the Cannes Film Festival, featuring Athena Film Festival’s artistic director Melissa Silverstein and European Women’s Audiovisual Network head of research and PR Francine Raveney, who discussed the state of women in film as part of Variety and Kering’s Women in Motion chat. »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Player,’ ‘Manhunter,’ ‘A Married Woman,’ and More

24 May 2016 8:28 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

A Married Woman (Jean-Luc Godard)

A Married Woman is an often overlooked masterwork from Godard’s most productive period. The plot appears to be simple: Charlotte (Macha Méril) is a young married woman having an affair with an actor. When she discovers that she is pregnant, she must decide which man is the father and which man she will stay with. In Godard’s hands, however, the film, described as a film about a woman’s beauty and the ugliness of her world, »

- The Film Stage

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A Hologram For The King review

23 May 2016 5:58 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Director Tom Tykwer tackles Dave Eggers' A Hologram For The King, with help from Tom Hanks. Here's our review...

The opening dream sequence of A Hologram For The King finds status symbols of the American dream evaporating into puffs of purple smoke as Alan Clay (Tom Hanks) paraphrases the opening of Talking Heads' Once In A Lifetime - “You may find yourself looking for your large automobile... without a beautiful house, without a beautiful wife and you may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?”- to the fourth wall and then the heavens above.

This is representative of writer-director Tom Tykwer's slightly sunnier take on Dave Eggers' acclaimed novel, in which struggling salesman Alan travels to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to pitch a virtual reality conferencing system to the king. Unfortunately, Alan is on thin ice with his company, who »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Witch,’ ‘The Naked Island,’ ‘Inherent Vice,’ and More

17 May 2016 8:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Witch (Robert Eggers)

“We will conquer this wilderness. It will not consume us,” foreshadows our patriarch in the first act of The Witch, a delightfully insane bit of 17th century devilish fun. As if Ingmar Bergman and Ken Russell co-directed Kill ListRobert Eggers’ directorial debut follows a God-fearing Puritan family banished from their settlement in a colonial New England, only to have their deep sense of faith uprooted when our title character has her way with their fate. »

- TFS Staff

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11 DC Comics movies awaiting a greenlight

15 May 2016 10:47 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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From Justice League Dark and The Batman to Lobo and Man Of Steel 2 - the DC movies that await a greenlight...

Big spoilers lie ahead for Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice

Whichever side of the imaginary rivalry you fall into, there's no denying that when it comes to movies, DC has got some catching up to do. In the same year as Marvel Studios released their first major crossover, The Avengers, Warner Bros released The Dark Knight Rises, the final chapter in Christopher Nolan's acclaimed Batman trilogy, which was firmly grounded in the notion that Bruce Wayne is the world's only superhero.

Nolan's disinterest in the larger DC toybox left Warners a few steps behind Disney and Marvel, especially after the failure of 2010's Jonah Hex and 2011's Green Lantern, the latter of which was intended as the first step into a wider universe. »

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First ‘Assassin’s Creed’ Trailer: You Might Not Have Expected The Spanish Inquisition

11 May 2016 10:36 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Like a thief in the night comes the first trailer for Assassin’s Creed, the start of what could end up being a film franchise based on Ubisoft’s long-running hit series of video games. Like the games on which it’s based, the film follows a man who through the use of futuristic technology is able to experience the memories of his ancestors and subsequently absord their skills. Like The Matrix meets Cloud Atlas. The hook is that said ancestors are members of the legendary… »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘In a Lonely Place,’ ‘Mustang,’ ‘All the President’s Men,’ and More

10 May 2016 7:51 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

In a Lonely Place (Nicholas Ray)

When a gifted but washed-up screenwriter with a hair-trigger temper—Humphrey Bogart, in a revelatory, vulnerable performance—becomes the prime suspect in a brutal Tinseltown murder, the only person who can supply an alibi for him is a seductive neighbor (Gloria Grahame) with her own troubled past. The emotionally charged In a Lonely Place, freely adapted from a Dorothy B. Hughes thriller, is a brilliant, turbulent mix of suspenseful noir and devastating melodrama, »

- TFS Staff

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‘The Revenant’ Exec Producers Form Facing East, Back ‘Inversion’

6 May 2016 6:36 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Markus Barmettler and Philip Lee, exec producers of “The Revenant,” have formed production-financing company Facing East and are backing sci-fi adventure “Inversion.”

The company, which plans three to four major productions every two years, is based in Beijing and Hong Kong. It announced Friday that “Inversion” has attached Peter Segal as director with Segal working on the screenplay with “Casino Royale” scribe Paul Haggis.

Principal photography is set to commence in August. The story follows a street-wise American con man and a young Chinese physicist as they race against the clock to save the earth from a terrifying loss of gravity.

Michael Nozik is also set to produce, with the screenplay credited to Bragi Schut, David Arata and Paul Haggis. Mark Damon’s Foresight Unlimited has been handling pre-sales and will sell the film in Cannes next week.

The Revenant” grossed $60 million in China. Barmettler and Lee have also been involved in “Cloud Atlas, »

- Dave McNary

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Florence Foster Jenkins movie review: don’t worry that it’s not good enough for anyone else to hear

6 May 2016 1:23 PM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

When Ffj sticks to farce, it works wonderfully, like something P.G. Wodehouse might have loved. But the longer it goes on, the more maudlin it gets. I’m “biast” (pro): like star Meryl Streep and director Stephen Frears; desperate for stories about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Typical. You wait forever for a movie about Florence Foster Jenkins, and then two come along at once. Actually, I’m pretty sure I’d never heard of Jenkins before this film entered my radar a few months back, but it’s easy to see what drew multiple filmmakers to her: She’s a great story. Jenkins was a real person, a rich socialite and music lover who lived in New York in the early 20th century and enjoyed performing amateur operatics, which is all well and good, except she was a terrible singer: always off-key, »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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Facing East (Hong Kong) Limited boards 'Inversion'

6 May 2016 10:10 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The Revenant executive producers Markus Barmettler and Philip Lee have launched the Hong Kong and Beijing-based producer-financier.

The executives, who between them have been involved in more than 20 productions including Forbidden Kingdom and Cloud Atlas, were instrumental in developing the multi-film agreement between Guangdong Alpha Animation and Culture Company, Catchplay Inc. and New Regency.  

Facing East has a profit participation position in the upcoming Assassins Creed and Splinter Cell, as well as The Revenant, and aims to produce three or four large features every two years, with support from Hsbc and unspecified Chinese financial institutions.

The first of these is Foresight Unlimited sales title Inversion (pictured), a sci-fi epic that Peter Segal will direct and aims to shoot in August. Segal is writing with Paul Haggis.

Foresight chief Mark Damon and his team have concluded a number of pre-sales and head to the market to clear up remaining rights.

Among the Facing East development slate is Chinatown »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Henry Gamble’s Birthday Party,’ ‘Arabian Nights,’ ‘Virginia Woolf,’ and More

3 May 2016 11:18 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arabian Nights (Miguel Gomes)

In lauding Miguel Gomes‘ three-part, six-and-a-half hour behemoth, it’s perhaps important to consider his background as a critic. Not just in terms of the trilogy’s cinephilic engagement with Rossellini, Alonso, Oliveira, etc.; also in its defiant nature. While it’s easy to assign the trilogy certain humanist and satirical labels from the get-go and just praise these films for following through on them, Gomes continually seeks to mutate and complicate his of age-of-austerity saga. »

- TFS Staff

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