Lost: Season 5, Episode 6

316 (18 Feb. 2009)

TV Episode  -   -  Adventure | Drama | Fantasy
8.6
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Ratings: 8.6/10 from 1,761 users  
Reviews: 6 user | 4 critic

Eloise explains that the Oceanic 6 have a very limited window to return to the island, and leaves Jack instructions to bring one of his father's items to John Locke.

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(creator), (creator), 3 more credits »
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Title: 316 (18 Feb 2009)

316 (18 Feb 2009) on IMDb 8.6/10

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Daniel Faraday (credit only)
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James 'Sawyer' Ford (credit only)
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Miles Straume (credit only)
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Juliet Burke (credit only)
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Storyline

Ben takes Jack, Sun, and Desmond to meet with Faraday's mother, scientist Eloise Hawking, (whom Desmond remembers years earlier leading him on the path to the island). Eloise tells them when and where the island will appear in time and the "window" to reach it, as well as the circumstances that brought them there in the first place. Jack decides to return with the corpse of Locke despite his doubts as to what may lie head for them, while Kate, Sayid, and Hurley need more convincing. Jack also visits his grandfather, residing in a nursing home, which leads him to do a little soul searching to seek his path. Written by matt-282

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TV-PG | See all certifications »
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18 February 2009 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The reason Christian is wearing the white tennis shoes instead of normal dress shoes is explained in this episode. See more »

Goofs

Every time Locke's envelope is shown, the handwriting is different. Also, sometimes Jack's name is in pencil and sometimes it's in ink. See more »

Quotes

Jack Shephard: It's pretty crazy, huh?
Kate Austen: Which part?
Jack Shephard: Hurley, Sayid, Ben... on the same plane. How did they end up here?
Kate Austen: They bought a ticket.
Jack Shephard: You don't think it means something that somehow we're all packed together?
Kate Austen: We are on the same plane, Jack, doesn't make us together.
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End Title
(uncredited)
Written by Michael Giacchino
Performed by The Hollywood Studio Symphony
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User Reviews

Another phenomenal, emotional, and above all satisfying episode
18 February 2009 | by (prejudicemadeplausible.wordpress.com) – See all my reviews

"316" is a good deal less frenzied than last week's "This Place is Death", and probably less 'exciting'. Still, the two are on the same level overall, though for different reasons. The emotional content and strength of writing for the characters is at the same (very high) level as last week, but with a clear focus no episode since last season has really had, and an emotional depth which is given more time to sink in than any of the individual scenes in the last episode. I didn't realize how much I missed a clear focus on one character until tonight, although I still prefer "This Place is Death" slightly.

"316" is notable for including only two, very short on-island scenes. This is easily the shortest amount of time spent on the island in any episode thus far and surprisingly, almost preposterously given its obvious importance to the show, the episode didn't really need the island to work. The island's presence is felt constantly through the episode, thematically and when literally referenced, so it never really feels like we're gone for too long. It helps that both scenes (and the latter is really the opening scene replayed with an added thirty seconds or so) are excellent, and it was really surprising to see the iconic first minute or so of "Pilot" play out again. Many were guessing we'd see that at the end of the series, but right now this show is unpredictable in the best way: you may guess the big reveals or guess the story, but you'll never guess how they will tell the story. Unless it's an Elizabeth Sarnoff episode, anyway. You could read all the spoilers available and still be surprised by an episode of "Lost". How great is that?

I think this is possibly Jack's best episode as a character. Not necessarily the best Jack-centric episode (although it is a contender), but the one I felt did most with his character. It was oddly touching to see him go through the little stuff, the awkward morning after with Kate, his visiting his grandfather, etc. It's probably Matthew Fox's best performance, just in how quiet and reserved and subtle it is. The scene with Locke's body in the butcher shop, and the scene where he finally reads Locke's suicide note were genuinely heartbreaking, but not in an over-dramatic way. Stunning, subtle, wonderful writing and acting.

The episode raises some mysteries which will be answered relatively soon (why was Ben so bloody? What happened to Aaron? Desmond? Penny? Sayid?! Who's the middle-eastern-looking guy? etc.), but none of them are annoyingly big ones to add to the many significant mysteries which haven't been answered yet. The whole episode had a creepy, foreboding air, and the near-complete sadness of Jack's existence over the hours in which the episode took place only added to it. Some really nice photography and direction here too. I was personally satisfied with how they got back (especially with the 'proxies', Sayid in Kate's cuffs, etc.) and the conclusion of the episode, though obviously we are still left with some big questions at the end. "316" and "The Life and Death of Jeremy Bentham", next week's episode, were written concurrently by the same writers ("Lost" auteurs Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse), and I have a feeling I'll appreciate this episode even more when its companion piece, which promises to be even greater, airs next week.


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