6.1/10
749
17 user 3 critic

Don't You Forget About Me (2009)

A group of young filmmakers have one goal in mind: to track down and interview the great writer/director John Hughes, responsible for many of the classic teen films that marked a whole ... See full summary »

Directors:

(as Matt Austin),
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
David Anderle ...
Himself
Mike Bender ...
Himself
Jackie Burch ...
Herself
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
Jennifer Gibgot ...
Herself
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
Jim Kerr ...
Himself
...
Herself
...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

A group of young filmmakers have one goal in mind: to track down and interview the great writer/director John Hughes, responsible for many of the classic teen films that marked a whole generation even today such as The Breakfast Club, Ferris Bueller Day-Off and Sixteen Candles. The documentary features testimonies from many actors who worked with Hughes, revealing what was special about his films and the way they conquered audiences through the years. Written by Rodrigo Amaro

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In 1991, filmmaker John Hughes disappeared from Hollywood. In 2008, four filmmakers went to find him.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

|

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

13 July 2010 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Goofs

The movie lists Richard Elfman as the lead singer of Oingo Boingo. Richard was the creator of the performance troupe "The Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo", the previous incarnation of the band Oingo Boingo. He is the brother to Oingo Boingo front man Danny Elfman and not a part of the musical group the resulted from his original concept. See more »

Quotes

Kevin Smith: He was a master, y'know, at what he did.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
I blame John Hughes for not setting the dogs on them
30 November 2013 | by (Yurp) – See all my reviews

The fact that Roger Ebert called John Hughes the "philosopher of adolescence" obscures the fact that he was to a larger degree a commercially highly successful writer, producer and also director of mainstream movies in general. Not all of them were great -- I think that Weird Science, for example, is crap (great title though). The documentary works great when we see all those familiar faces from his best movies such as "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" thirty years later talking about their joyful memories from when they were young and stars. Then there is a lot of eulogizing from teenagers who say that modern movies don't know what teenagers are about, but teenagers probably always would say that.

To give the documentary a framework, the contributors to the documentary then set off to visit John Hughes at his home in Chicago, ostensibly to ask him to direct another teen movie. This charade is kind of annoying because it changes the focus of the documentary from Hughes to the film team, which we don't really care for all that much. Hughes of course doesn't come out to meet the camera crew, and later returns their letter without any further reply or comment. A short while after, he dies of a heart attack in New York City.

The movies has its ups (the interviews with the actors) and downs (the eulogizing of the "good old times of teen cinema when actors didn't divulge their private life on Facebook"), but overall it was nice to get a bit more insight into John Hughes' work.


2 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page