7.8/10
31
3 user 1 critic

Lost Sparrow (2009)

| Documentary
On June 27, 1978, a 44-car freight train struck and killed two Crow Indian brothers near the quaint town of Little Falls, NY. The day before, Bobby, 13, and Tyler, 11, had disappeared. They... See full summary »

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On June 27, 1978, a 44-car freight train struck and killed two Crow Indian brothers near the quaint town of Little Falls, NY. The day before, Bobby, 13, and Tyler, 11, had disappeared. They had run away from the white, Baptist family that seven years earlier had adopted them out of a troubled home on the Crow reservation in Montana. Their new home, a vast 19th century Victorian castle, seemed idyllic. But the boys had discovered a dark secret. They were killed as they tried to return to the reservation to get help. In the documentary LOST SPARROW, filmmaker Chris Billing has embarked on a quest to find out what happened to his adoptive brothers, and to confront a painful family history. Written by Chris Billing

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Three decades ago, two Crow Indian brothers ran away from home and no one knew why. Their sudden and mysterious deaths sent shock waves through a tiny upstate New York community. This is their adoptive brother's journey to bring the two boys home and confront a painful truth that shattered his family.

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1.78 : 1
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Brilliant film
21 December 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This film, though painful to watch, was brilliantly done -- uniquely moving and thoughtful, and beautifully executed; viewers are left aching for every member of the director's family. The larger issue at the heart of the film, child sex abuse, affects every culture, every community, and every country, without exception, and while we often choose to look away, 'Lost Sparrow' reminds us how this epidemic damages and often destroys the most vulnerable people in our midst. The cameras in this documentary are unflinching, owing almost certainly to the director's background in hard news. Highly, highly recommended, although I would caution parents against showing it to children younger than about 15. (Having read the previous review, I should add that I believe at least one of the director's biological siblings was interviewed as were both parents).


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