Warner Bros. uses the movies to prepare the US for war and keep up morale on the home front during World War II.

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Narrator (voice)
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Himself (archive footage)
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Himself (archive footage)
Joseph Goebbels ...
Himself (archive footage) (as Josef Goebbels)
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Himself (archive footage) (as Franklin Delano Roosevelt)
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(archive footage)
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Himself (archive footage)
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Storyline

Documentary centering on how Warner Brothers studios made movies prior to, during and just after World War II; it touches on the history of the four Warner sons, and begins with brief information about some World War I movies' then it quickly goes through the 1920's and into film made during the depression, and focuses on 1939's Confessions of A Nazi Spy. Then, as the government requested, more propagandized films were churned out to life morale during the early days of the war. The documentary finishes up with Pride of the Marines, which helped prepare America for the homecomings of wounded vets, and mentions the ramifications of Mission to Moscow on the Warner Brothers, a film made on request of FDR to help convince Americans that an alliance with the Soviet Union was a good idea. Written by Ron Kerrigan <mvg@whidbey.com>

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Documentary

Certificate:

TV-PG
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Release Date:

11 November 2008 (USA)  »

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Did You Know?

Connections

Features Black Legion (1937) See more »

Soundtracks

Over There
(uncredited)
Written by George M. Cohan
Sung by James Cagney, Joan Leslie, and ensemble
(film clip from Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942))
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User Reviews

 
Warner at War was a pretty good overview of this studio's filmic impact during the second World War
17 March 2010 | by (Baton Rouge, La.) – See all my reviews

Just watched this documentary of Warner Bros. Pictures' effort to get Americans in the spirit of achieving victory during World War II and of keeping Homefront viewers entertained with plenty of All-Star musicals made in that period. Among those musicals represented was Irving Berlin's This is the Army which is where this 48-minute special film was presented in its DVD disc in a three disc set called "Warner Bros. and the Homefront Collection". Narrated by Steven Spielberg, he provided enough information about the studio's founding siblings, especially Jack and Harry, of some of the controversy they were willing to risk when making Confessions of a Nazi Spy-which came out just before the battle started with the Poland attack-and Mission to Moscow-which was a propaganda piece made to sell Communist country Russia as a necessary ally. Not every clip was represented by the studio. In fact, clips from United Artists' The Great Dictator and Germany's Triumph of the Will were also shown. Add in some scathing Hitler parodies in Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck cartoons and the many war films of the leading men of the studio roster and you've got a pretty balanced overview of Warners' impact on cur country's morale. So on that note, Warner at War comes highly recommended.


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