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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 38 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘Who We Are Now’ Review: Julianne Nicholson Proves Once Again She’s One of the Greatest Actresses Alive — Tiff

14 September 2017 12:49 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If there were any justice in this sick, sad world, history would remember 2017 as the year that people woke the hell up and stopped taking Julianne Nicholson for granted. There isn’t, and it won’t, but that shouldn’t stop us from giving America’s most under-appreciated screen actress the credit she’s been owed since the last century. Raw and intractably real in a number of small indies that you’ve probably never seen (“Tully,” “Flannel Pajamas”), just as good in a handful of larger films that you probably have (“Kinsey,” “August: Osage County”), and even better in three new movies that you’ll be able to see in the next few months (including “I, Tonya” and “Novitiate”), the elfin Massachusetts native may spend the brunt of her time working “Law & Order” gigs on TV, but she has an authenticity that bigger stars can’t buy and a »

- David Ehrlich

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Tiff Review: ‘Lady Bird’ is Wise, Funny, Remarkably Assured, and One of the Year’s Great Joys

10 September 2017 1:17 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Lady Bird is one of the year’s great joys. Greta Gerwig’s debut as a solo writer-director is so wise, so funny, and so remarkably assured that it seems to have flown in out of nowhere. Where did this nearly perfect coming-of-age comedy and emotionally affecting study of youth, social status, and financial malaise come from? The answer has been hiding in plain sight. As an actress, Gerwig has shown inimitable intelligence in films such as Frances Ha and 20th Century Women. She has now moved behind the camera for a 2002-set study of a Sacramento teen’s final year of high school, starring Saoirse Ronan, Laurie Metcalf, Tracy Letts, Lucas Hedges, and Timothée Chalamet, with music by Jon Brion.

Even after mentioning the involvement of such an ensemble of talent, I’m not sure anyone could have anticipated just how strong a film Lady Bird would be, or »

- Christopher Schobert

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Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Sam Shepard

3 August 2017 3:42 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – He was a true renaissance man, but his unassuming persona would conceal that lofty designation. Sam Shepard was a playwright, actor, author, screenwriter and director of countless important stage and screen works. Shepard died on July 27th, 2017, of complications due to Lou Gehrig’s Disease (Als). He was 73.

Sam Shepard, American Storyteller

Photo credit: 
File Photo

He was born Samuel Shepard Rogers III in Fort Sheridan, Illinois, and graduated high school in California. After a brief stint in college, he started his career in a traveling theater repertory company. After landing in New York City, he dropped the Rogers from his name and began to work Off Broadway. He won six Obie Awards for his stage writing, and began his screen career by penning “Me and My Brother” (1968) and “Zabriskie Point” (1970). His had a love connection with rocker Patti Smith, which led to the collaborative play “Cowboy Mouth” (1971). He »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Actor and Playwright Sam Shepard Dead at 73

31 July 2017 3:20 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Sam Shepard, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and Oscar-nominated actor, died Sunday at the age of 73. The winner of 13 Obie Awards, Shepard won his first six for plays he penned between 1966 and 1968. After his success on the off-Broadway stage, Shepard segued to screenwriting with credits on films like Michelangelo Antonioni’s Zabriske Point before turning to acting. Besides his Oscar-nominated turn as Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff, Shepard also acted in MudBlack Hawk DownThe NotebookThe Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert FordAugust: Osage County. Shepard suffered from Als and was 73.

From The New York Times:

Sam Shepard, whose hallucinatory plays redefined the landscape of the American West and its inhabitants, died on Thursday at his home in Kentucky of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, a spokesman for the Shepard family announced on Monday. He was 73. Possessed of a stoically »

- Tom Stockman

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Playwright, actor Sam Shepard dies aged 73

31 July 2017 11:05 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and actor who suffered from Als died at his home.

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and Oscar-nominated actor Sam Shepard has died from Als. He was 73.

Shepard died on July 27 at his home in Kentucky surrounded by family. “The family requests privacy at this difficult time,” Chris Boneau, the spokesman for the family, said.

Shephard won the Pulitzer Prize in 1979 for his play Buried Child and received a best supporting actor Oscar nomination for his role as Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff.

His final on-screen appearance came in 2015 on the Netflix drama Bloodline. As an actor his screen credits include Days Of Heaven, Resurrection, Frances, Country, Fool For Love, Crimes Of The Heart, Baby Boom, Steel Magnolias, Bright Angel, Defenseless, Hamlet, The Notebook, Black Hawk Down, The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford, Brothers, Mud, August: Osage County, Cold in July, Midnight Special, In Dubious Battle, and You Were »

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Sam Shepard, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Playwright and 'Notebook' Actor, Dead at 73

31 July 2017 10:25 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Accomplished playwright and actor Sam Shepard has died, Et can confirm. He was 73 years old.

Shepard died at his home in Kentucky on July 27 of complications from Als, and was surrounded by his family at the time of his death, Chris Boneau, spokesman for the family, said on Monday. Shepard is survived by his children -- Jesse, Hannah and Walker Shepard -- and his sisters, Sandy and Roxanne Rogers.

Funeral arrangements remain private, and plans for a public memorial have not yet been determined.

Pics: Stars We've Lost In Recent Years

"The family requests privacy at this difficult time," Boneau said in a statement.

Shepard found incredible success as both a playwright and as an actor. He won a Pulitzer Prize for drama for his 1979 play, Buried Child, and wrote 40 plays over the course of his career. He also wrote the screenplays for Zabriskie Point; Wim Wenders' Paris, Texas; and Robert Altman's Fool for Love, a film »

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Sam Shepard, Actor and Playwright, Dead at 73

31 July 2017 9:17 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Sam Shepard, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and Oscar-nominated actor, died Sunday at the age of 73.

Shepard, who suffered from Als in recent years, died at his home in Kentucky from complications from the disease, his rep told The Hollywood Reporter.

The winner of 13 Obie Awards, Shepard won his first six for plays he penned between 1966 and 1968. After his success on the off-Broadway stage, Shepard segued to screenwriting with credits on films like Michelangelo Antonioni's Zabriske Point and Robert Frank's Me and My Brother

During this time, Shepard also »

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Sam Shepard, Pulitzer-Winning Playwright and Celebrated Actor, Dies at 73

31 July 2017 8:31 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Sam Shepard, the acclaimed playwright who was also praised as an actor, screenwriter, and director, has died. He was 73.

He died on Thursday at his home in Kentucky following complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, a family spokesman confirmed to Variety.

Known for writing that suffused the fringes of American society with a surreal and brutal poetry, Shepard rose to fame when he won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for his play “Buried Child.” He was also nominated for an Academy Award in the supporting actor category for his part in the 1983 film “The Right Stuff.”

He wrote or co-wrote screenplays for Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Zabriskie Point,” and Robert Altman’s “Fool for Love,” based on his play.

Shepard was one of the leading figures of the Off Off Broadway movement that flourished in downtown New York beginning in the early 1960s. His »

- Gordon Cox

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Sam Shepard, Pulitzer-Winning Playwright and Celebrated Actor, Dies at 73

31 July 2017 8:31 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sam Shepard, the acclaimed playwright who was also praised as an actor, screenwriter, and director, has died. He was 73.

He died on Thursday at his home in Kentucky following complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, a family spokesman confirmed to Variety.

Related

Celebrities Who Died in 2017

Known for writing that suffused the fringes of American society with a surreal and brutal poetry, Shepard rose to fame when he won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for his play “Buried Child.” He was also nominated for an Academy Award in the supporting actor category for his part in the 1983 film “The Right Stuff.”

He wrote or co-wrote screenplays for Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Zabriskie Point,” and Robert Altman’s “Fool for Love,” based on his play.

Shepard was one of the leading figures of the Off Off Broadway movement that flourished in downtown New York beginning in the early »

- Gordon Cox

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Oscar-Nominated Actor Sam Shepard Dies After Secret Battle with Als

31 July 2017 8:19 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Sam Shepard, known for his acting work in films such as Black Hawk Down and The Right Stuff, has died. He was 73.

Shepard’s theater representative confirms to People that Shepard passed away at his home in Kentucky on Thursday, July 27, from complications from Als, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The actor’s battle with Als was not publicly known. He was with his family at the time of his death.

“The family requests privacy at this difficult time,” said Chris Boneau, the family’s spokesman.

The representative said funeral arrangements would remain private. Plans for a public »

- Stephanie Petit and Dave Quinn

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Julia Roberts to Topline Amazon Series “Homecoming”

19 July 2017 1:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Julia Roberts in “Money Monster

Homecoming” is headed to the small screen and Julia Roberts is leading the way. The Oscar winner will star in a TV adaptation of the fictional podcast of the same name. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the psychological and political thriller landed at Amazon with a two-season pickup in a “competitive situation.”

The show will follow a “caseworker at a secret government facility (played by Roberts) and a soldier eager to rejoin civilian life.” No word on who will play the soldier.

The project hails from “Mr. Robot” creator Sam Esmail, who is among the show’s executive producers and will also direct. Writing duties will be taken on by the podcast’s creators, Eli Horowitz and Micah Bloomberg.

Amazon has secured the international rights to “Homecoming.” The series will debut “all at once on Amazon Prime Video around the world,” according to THR.

Roberts won an Oscar in 2001 for “Erin Brockovich.” She’s also received nods for “August: Osage County,” “Pretty Woman,” and “Steel Magnolias.” Her recent credits include “Money Monster,” “Secret in Their Eyes,” and “The Normal Heart.”

While Roberts has never starred in a TV series before, “Homecoming” isn’t her only small screen project in the works. She’s signed on to topline and produce an upcoming HBO limited series based on Maria Semple’s bestselling novel “Today Will Be Different,” a story about a woman who decides to reinvent her life.

Julia Roberts to Topline Amazon Series “Homecoming” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Heather Graham joins Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders

25 June 2017 6:10 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Variety is reporting that Heather Graham (The Hangover), Elizabeth Reaser (The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn) and Larry Cedar (Mad Men) has signed on to the cast of the upcoming NBC series Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders, where they will join Edie Falco (The Sopranos), Julianne Nicholson (August: Osage County), Anthony Edwards (Top Gun) and Sam Jaeger (Parenthood).

Graham is set to play Judalon Smyth, a sexy, emotionally fragile woman who is having an affair with Dr. Oziel, with Reaser as Deputy District Attorney Pam Bozanich, who is assigned to the murders of Jose and Kitty Menendez, and Cedar as Milton Andersen, Kitty’s older brother.

Here’s the official synopsis for the true crime series, which gets underway on September 26th on NBC…

Starring the incomparable Emmy and Golden Globe winner Edie Falco (The Sopranos, Nurse Jackie), this new true-crime installment of the powerhouse Law & Order franchise delivers »

- Gary Collinson

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Meryl Streep’s Best Movie Lines

22 June 2017 3:09 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Over her storied career, Meryl Streep has racked up dozens of film credits going back to the ’70s, scored a record-breaking 20 Oscar nominations (along with three wins), and, of course, delivered golden line after golden line.

With the actress turning 68 on Thursday, Variety decided it was as good a time as any to look back at some of Streep’s best lines, from the funny to the sassy to the downright inspirational.

“How do I look?” — Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)

Following a divorce, and nasty custody battle complete with character assassination and conflicted emotion, Streep as Joanna Kramer seals her first Oscar win with a question — “How do I look?” — as she boards an elevator to see her son.

“The dingo took my baby!” – “Cry in the Dark” (1988)

Often misquoted as “A dingo ate my baby,” Streep’s exclamation after a wild dog snatches her infant from a tent, delivered in a flawless Australian accent, has become part of pop culture. Elaine made it a memorable put-down in a “Seinfeld” episode.

“I’m not a box. I don’t have sides. This is it. One side fits all.” — “Postcards From the Edge” (1990)

In “Postcards From the Edge,” Meryl Streep is Carrie Fisher’s muse, and embodies the late Hollywood royal in all her snarky, unpredictable, and out-of-control glory. With this line, Streep’s Suzanne Vale snaps back at her love interest Jack Faulkner (Dennis Quaid) to make sure he knows exactly where they stand.

“I am a righteous bitch, aren’t I?” — “Dancing at Lughnasa” (1998)

In the long history of Streep delivering flawlessly sassy lines, let no one forget her 1998 role in period film “Dancing at Lughnasa,” where she played Kate “Kit” Mundy. After her sister Aggie (Brid Brennan) declares, “Do you ever listen to yourself, Kate? You are such a damned righteous bitch,” Streep’s Kit can only delightfully agree.

“That is what we do. That is what people do. They stay alive for each other.” — “The Hours” (2002)

In one heartbreaking scene of “The Hours,” Streep, who plays New Yorker Clarissa Vaughan, has a candid conversation with the AIDs-striken Richard (Ed Harris), who asks her why he should even stay alive, if not for her.

“The assassin always dies, baby. It’s necessary for the national healing.” — “The Manchurian Candidate” (2004)

Meryl Streep played U.S. Senator Eleanor Prentiss Shaw, the manipulative mother of Liev Schreiber’s Raymond Shaw. She perfectly embodies the ruthless nature of her character when she delivers the difficult truth to her son.

Various — “Devil Wears Prada” (2006)

Where to even start with Streep’s endlessly quotable performance as Miranda Priestly? At the end, of course, with the line that the actress brilliantly tweaked during the table read from “Everybody wants to be me” to “Everybody wants to be us.” With this statement we realize how much Andy (Anne Hathaway) has changed (and, really, how much we all have). Some of Streep’s greatest lines stem from her impatient snark (“By all means, move at a glacial pace. You know how that thrills me.”) And she has a certain specialty in the way she delivers questions (“Why is no one ready?”; “Florals? For spring? Groundbreaking.”). But the line that defines Streep’s performance, is the two-word dismissal that becomes her refrain: “That’s all.”

“I have doubts… I have such doubts.” — “Doubt” (2008)

Meryl Streep allows the veneer of stern self-assurance in her character, Sister Aloysius Beauvier, to crack in a moment of emotional release. “I have doubts … I have such doubts,” she breaks down about her ability to expose Father Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman), and her faith in the church at large.

“If what I think is happening is happening … it better not be.” — “Fantastic Mr. Fox” (2009)

Meryl Streep is the matriarch in Wes Anderson’s endlessly quirky and quippy animated masterpiece — stern and even, and a foil for her rambunctious husband voiced by George Clooney. In this scene she calls out his tomfoolery: “If what I think is happening,” she says, and the camera closes in on her judgmental gaze. “… it better not be.”

“These damn things are as hot as a stiff c—!” – “Julie and Julia” (2009)

Meryl Streep totally nailed TV chef Julia Child’s breathy and sometimes risqué enthusiasm, as in this scene where she pulls two large cannellonis from boiling water using her bare hands.

“We will stand on principle, or we will not stand at all.” — “The Iron Lady” (2011)

Streep’s performance as Margaret Thatcher earned her her most recent Oscar, and it’s easy to see why. When she tells Alexander Haig (Matthew Marsh) about why she will go to war with Argentina in an empassioned speech, it’s hard not to get chills.

“Is anybody supposed to smoke?” — “August: Osage County” (2013)

Streep played the delightfully sardonic Violet Weston in John Wells’ adaptation of Tracy Letts’ play. Her response to Ivy’s (Julianne Nicholson) quite obvious question is only one of many memorable lines from the drama (though not uttered by Streep, who can forget Julia Roberts’ “Eat the fish, bitch”?)

What’s your favorite Meryl Streep movie line? Let us know in the comments below!

Related storiesMeryl Streep, Judith Light, Lena Dunham, More Tell Sheila Nevins' Stories in New AudiobookRobert De Niro Calls Out Trump Administration's 'Bulls--' While Accepting Career Achievement AwardSteven Spielberg Pentagon Papers Drama Gets 2017 Oscar-Season Release »

- Variety Staff

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Meryl Streep Makes History with 20th Oscar Nom: A Look Back at Her Iconic Nominated Roles

22 June 2017 10:15 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Last year, Meryl Streep received her 20th Academy Award nomination for her performance in Florence Foster Jenkins. Streep’s nod makes her the most nominated performer in Oscars history. 

In honor of Streep’s incredible feat (which she celebrated with an epic gif of her dancing; see below), we’re looking back at the roles that got her the accolades. 

via Giphy

(We’re just as excited as you, Meryl!)

1979: The Deer Hunter

Though she didn’t win for her turn as the girlfriend of a fallen soldier in Vietnam, the role helped establish Streep as one to watch in the awards show game, »

- Maria Yagoda and Diana Pearl

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Julia Roberts' First TV Series 'Today Will Be Different' Lands at HBO

1 June 2017 2:16 PM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

Julia Roberts will be making her TV series debut over at HBO.

The premium cable network has picked up the limited series, Today Will Be Different, starring the 49-year-old Oscar winner, Et has learned.

Related: Julia Roberts Onboard to Star in Her First TV Series

The series -- which marks Roberts' first-ever TV show -- was first announced in December of last year and was being shopped around to various networks.

Based on Maria Semple's best-selling novel of the same name, Today Will Be Different is about a day in the life of Eleanor Flood (Roberts), who decides she will no longer put off the little tasks she has been neglecting in search of having the best day of her life. The heartfelt comedy takes several turns when obstacles like a son who is faking sick and a memoir released by a former colleague derail her simple plan.

Roberts will executive produce alongside Semple, who is penning »

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Dylan Sellers Returns to The Weinstein Company as Production President

17 May 2017 8:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Dylan Sellers has returned to The Weinstein Company and resumed his previous role as president of U.S. production, acquisitions, and development — three years after leaving the post.

The announcement was made on Wednesday by TWC Co-Chairman Harvey Weinstein and COO/President David Glasser. Sellers will operate out of the studio’s L.A. office, where he will oversee all film projects in development and acquisition titles, and continue building the studio’s slate.

As part of his new role, Sellers will also be involved in television production. Negeen Yazdi will continue as president of international production and acquisitions from the London office.

Sellers served as TWC president of production from 2011 to 2014 and oversaw “August: Osage County,” “St. Vincent,” and “Southpaw.” He was also involved in the acquisitions and development of upcoming TWC titles: “The Current War,” starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Michael Shannon, and “Untouchable,” starring Bryan Cranston, Kevin Hart, »

- Dave McNary

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Dylan Sellers Returns to Weinstein Company as President of Production

17 May 2017 7:17 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Dylan Sellers will return to The Weinstein Company after a three year absence, the company announced Wednesday. Sellers will assume his previous role of President of U.S. production, acquisitions and development, Co-Founder Harvey Weinstein and TWC President David Glasser said. The hire is effective immediately. Sellers will add television to his purview, and Negeen Yazdi will continue as President of International Production and Acquisitions from the London office. Also Read: Michael Moore, Harvey Weinstein Reunite for Surprise Trump Doc 'Fahrenheit 11/9' The executive previously held the title from 2011-2014, where he shepherded films like ensemble Oscar bait “August: Osage County, »

- Matt Donnelly

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Dylan Sellers Returning To Weinstein Co As President Of Production

17 May 2017 1:22 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Dylan Sellers is returning to The Weinstein Company as President of Production, a job he held previously before exiting to produce films. He first joined TWC from Bob Shaye and Michael Lynne's Unique Pictures in 2012. He had a three-year stint at TWC where he worked across titles such as August: Osage County and St. Vincent. Sellers stepped down from the company in 2014 after his contract expired. Here’s the Weinstein release announcing the reteam, and Sellers’ new title… »

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'The Lovers' Movie Review: Bittersweet Rom-Com Gives Debra Winger Her Comeback

4 May 2017 10:42 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Mary (Debra Winger) and Michael (Tracy Letts) are married. She has something going on the sly with an Irish novelist  (Aidan Gillen); he's been sneaking around with a high-strung ballet teacher (Melora Walters). Both are counting the days until they can dissolve the union and move in with their new partners. Then, on the brink of separation, Mary and Michael decide they still turn each other on – and start cheating on their side dishes with each other.

That, in a tweet and a half, is the plot of The Lovers, »

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The top 25 films (that people have seen more than 5 times)

19 April 2017 1:33 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew Apr 20, 2017

What tend to be the highest rated movies, where the criteria is said films have been watched at least five times?

One aside in a recent piece I penned at this site questioned whether films such as The Shawshank Redemption – for some time ranked as the best film of all time by popular vote at the IMDb – were favoured amongst those who’d seen it more than one time. I was questioning whether the films we tend to salute as the greatest – rather than our favourites – are the ones we tend to watch time and time again.

In the same article, for instance, I highlighted Schindler’s List, an excellent film, but not one I see too many people watching on six monthly rotation. That doesn’t make it a lesser film, rather, it’s the kind of movie that I’d imagine most have seen once or twice at best, »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 38 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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