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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

1-20 of 39 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Film News: Anton Yelchin, Chekov from ‘Star Trek’ Reboot, Dies at 27

20 June 2016 4:37 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Los Angeles – The loss of a up-and-coming actor at an early age is always a tragic event, and Anton Yelchin has been added to that roster. In a freak automobile accident at his home, Yelchin died on June 19th, 2016. He was best known for embracing the role of Pavel Chekov in the “Star Trek” film series reboot. He was 27 years old.

Yelchin came to Chicago in 2011 to promote his romantic drama “Like Crazy,” and his charismatic youth was confidently within his burgeoning career. At that point, at 22 years old, he had already done the “Star Trek” reboot and “Terminator: Salvation,” and was looking forward to roles in “The Beaver” and as a voice actor in the first “Smurfs” film. He was intelligent, and had a good-head-on-his-shoulders perspective regarding the sometimes crazy world of the film business.

Anton Yelchin in ‘Star Trek

Photo credit: Paramount Home Entertainment

Anton Yelchin was born in 1989 in St. »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Hollywood Reacts to the Tragic Death of Anton Yelchin

19 June 2016 1:34 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The Hollywood community is in mourning once again, after news broke earlier today that Anton Yelchin has died from a freak car accident. The actor was found dead at his home in the San Fernando Valley early this morning, pinned between his car and a concrete mailbox. As news of this tragic death started to spread, several of the actor's co-stars, friends, colleagues and others in the Hollywood community mourned his death on social media. Paramount Pictures also released the following statement regarding the beloved actor's death.

"All of us at Paramount join the world in morning the untimely passing of Antony Yelchin. As a member of the Star Trek family, he was beloved by so many and he will missed by all. We share our deepest condolences with his mother, father and family."

The actor is probably best known for playing Chekov in J.J. Abrams' 2009 Star Trek, its »

- MovieWeb

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Jodie Foster Pays Tribute to Anton Yelchin, A ‘Rare & Beautiful Soul’

19 June 2016 1:33 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Jodie Foster, who directed Anton Yelchin in her 2011 film “The Beaver,” has commented on the up-and-coming actor’s untimely passing in an accident outside his home early this morning. In a statement provided to Indiewire, she called the 27-year-old a “rare and beautiful soul” she was honored to have worked with. Read her full statement below.

Read More: Anton Yelchin Dead at 27: ‘Star Trek’ Actor Dies in ‘Freak Accident’

“Anton… What a rare and beautiful soul with his unstoppable passion for life. He was equal parts serious thinker and the most fun little brother you could ever dream of. I am so honored to have been able to direct such a deep actor, so committed and genuine. I will forever be grateful for all of those little exchanges we shared, his contagious enthusiasm, his questions, his company. My heart breaks for his mom and dad who were a part of every anecdote. »

- Michael Nordine

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Rip Anton Yelchin: 9 Reasons We Loved His Performances

19 June 2016 1:24 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Anton Yelchin passed away at the tragically young age of 27, at a time when many actors’ careers are just gathering momentum. But Yelchin had already amassed an impressive filmography that stretched back to his childhood, with an eclectic mixture of blockbusters, TV projects, and smaller efforts. “I’m just a huge supporter of this universe of filmmaking,” he told IndieWire in 2011. “It’s just fundamental. I can’t stress that enough.” Here, the IndieWire team shares their thoughts on why Yelchin stood out.

A Rare Screen Presence

Yelchin was the rare young actor to convey a plucky disposition while something gentler and melancholic lurked beneath the surface. As the energetic teen offspring of the troubled shrink on “Huff,” Yelchin was often the sole voice of reason in a sea of anxiety-riddled adults. While they grappled with middle-age, he was tasked with calling them on the pithy nature of their problems. »

- Indiewire Staff

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'Star Trek' actor Anton Yelchin's Jeep had been subject to recall

19 June 2016 12:59 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

June 20 Update: The model of Jeep that apparently crushed rising star Anton Yelchin in his driveway in the small hours of Sunday had been recalled.

The 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee model had been recalled by Fiat Chrysler for an issue with the gearshift that confused drivers and led them to believe the car was parked when in fact it was in neutral.

Investigators on Monday said they had not yet determined the cause of the accident.

June 19 Report: Rising star Anton Yelchin was found dead early on Sunday morning (June 19) at his Los Angeles area home in an apparent freak accident involving his car, according to reports. He was 27.

Yelchin’s publicist Jennifer Allen confirmed the death to press nd later in the day, a spokesperson for the Los Angeles Police Department confirmed the cause of death.

“A fatal traffic collision happened in Studio City,” said the department’s Jenny Hauser.

“On Sunday »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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'Star Trek' actor Anton Yelchin dies aged 27

19 June 2016 12:59 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Rising star Anton Yelchin was found dead early on Sunday morning (June 19) at his Los Angeles area home in an apparent freak accident involving his car, according to reports. He was 27.

Yelchin’s publicist Jennifer Allen confirmed the death to press nd later in the day, a spokesperson for the Los Angeles Police Department confirmed the cause of death.

“A fatal traffic collision happened in Studio City,” said the department’s Jenny Hauser.

“On Sunday, June 19 at 1:10 in the morning, a fatal traffic collision occurred. It was the result of the victim’s own car rolling backwards down his steep driveway, pinning him against a brick mailbox pillar and security fence.

“The victim was on his way to meet his friends for rehearsal. And when he didn’t show up, his friends went to his house, where they found him deceased by his car. It appeared he had momentarily exited his car leaving it in the »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Anton Yelchin dead at 27

19 June 2016 12:59 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The rising star was found dead early on Sunday morning at his Los Angeles area home from an apparent freak accident involving a car, according to reports. He was 27.

Yelchin’s publicist Jennifer Allen confirmed the death to press on Sunday morning and later in the day, a spokesperson for the Los Angeles Police Department confirmed the cause of death.

“A fatal traffic collision happened in Studio City,” said the department’s Jenny Hauser.

“On Sunday, June 19 at 1:10 in the morning, a fatal traffic collision occurred. It was the result of the victim’s own car rolling backwards down his steep driveway, pinning him against a brick mailbox pillar and security fence.

“The victim was on his way to meet his friends for rehearsal. And when he didn’t show up, his friends went to his house, where they found him deceased by his car. It appeared he had momentarily exited his car leaving it in the »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Anton Yelchin Dies from Freak Accident at Age 27

19 June 2016 12:28 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The entertainment community is in mourning once again today, as a young actor passed away far too soon. Anton Yelchin, who plays Chekov in the rebooted Star Trek movies, including next month's Star Trek Beyond, has passed away at the age of 27. While details are still coming in, the actor appears to have died from a freak car accident.

Deadline reports that the actor was found by his friends early this morning, pinned by his car against a brick mailbox and security gate, apparently crushed to death by his own vehicle. No foul play is suspected in this car accident, although no further details were given. Here's what the actor's publicist Jennifer Allan had to say in a brief statement.

"Actor Anton Yelchin was killed in a fatal traffic collision early this morning. His family requests you respect their privacy at this time."

TMZ reveals that the actor's friends became »

- MovieWeb

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Hollywood Take Note: Here Are 16 Women Who Dominated the Cannes Film Festival

25 May 2016 5:08 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Forget the Cannes jury awards. This year, the most famous film festival in the world showcased something much bigger than a couple of prize-winners: Women filmmakers and actors at the top of their game.

It was hard to miss how much the women before and behind the camera were front and center, dominating the conversation in Cannes. More of the Official Selection films were focused on women than ever before. And a new kind of protagonist emerged at Cannes 2016. She’s independent, strong, often androgynous, and not defined by her relationships with men.

Hollywood producers, executives and filmmakers, take note. This is how it can be done.

Check out the fabulous women of Cannes 2016.

Isabelle Huppert

In Paul Verhoeven’s provocative thriller “Elle,” Isabelle Huppert plays a videogame entrepreneur who refuses to allow her violent rape in her own home to ruin her life. She doesn’t miss a beat. She doesn’t call the cops. She changes the locks, gets an Std test,  buys pepper spray and learns how to use a gun. She’s a sophisticated, elegant, powerful, modern woman who lives alone, runs her own company, manipulates her family, has sex with whomever she fancies, and is free to do as she pleases.

At 63, Huppert believably plays a younger woman in her sexual prime, bringing all her experience to bear on the role, which was adapted from a French novel by an American screenwriter (David Birke) and then translated back into French when Huppert came aboard. She elevates the character into almost making sense. Typically, Verhoeven refuses to supply psychological underpinnings for what she does. But Huppert makes us believe. With critics and awards-savvy Sony Pictures Classics behind “Elle,” this commercial movie could wind up a North American hit this fall, a French Oscar nominee (if France submits it), and a Best Actress Oscar contender.

Kristen Stewart

Another independent woman is at the center of Olivier Assayas’ “Personal Shopper,” his second English-language film starring Stewart (Cesar-winner for “Clouds of Sils Maria”). She plays Maureen, who acquires fashionable clothes for a rich client, flits around Paris on a scooter, and reaches the people in her life via Skype and mobile. She’s trying to use her skills as a medium to communicate with her twin brother, who has recently died, when mysterious texts suddenly appear on her iPhone. “Who is this?” she asks. “Personal Shopper” tracks a lost and lonely soul who is disconnected from herself. As she tries on her client’s sexy costumes and figures out who is tracking her, she eventually finds her identity again.

Stewart had a good Cannes, showing her stripes not only in her roles in “Personal Shopper” and opener Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society,” but by deftly fielding, with finesse and poise, the many questions thrown at her during press conferences and interviews. She refused to be drawn into the Allen controversy (unlike co-star Blake Lively), wore flats when she could have worn heels, and explained why she likes working with intellectual directors like Assayas. She’s a smart career shaper with a rosy future who rather than conform to Hollywood demands, prefers to make her own choices on the world stage.

Maren Ade and Sandra Hüller

Father-daughter tension forms the backbone of two of the best films in Competition, Screen International’s critics’ poll winner “Toni Erdmann” and directing prize co-winner Cristian Mungiu’s “Graduation.”

German filmmaker Maren Ade‘s third feature is a generational comedy that pits a goofy father (Peter Simonischek) against his workaholic corporate strategist daughter Ines (Sandra Hüller). She’s a woman in a man’s world who thinks she doesn’t need feminism, who Ade sees as almost “a gender-neutral character.” After anxiously trying to prove herself to her male bosses, Ines eventually gets what her father is trying to tell her via his crazy antics and humor. She sees things more clearly, reconnects with him, and takes control of her own life.

Maria Dragus

The young Romanian star of Michael Haneke’s “The White Ribbon” shines in Mungiu’s “Graduation,” which sends a controlling father (Adrian Titieni) into a tailspin when his long-held post-graduation plans for his daughter (Dragus) go terribly awry. At the start of “Graduation,” the daughter’s rape sets in motion a series of revelations, compromises and ethical dilemmas as the father tries desperately to keep things on track. To her credit, his daughter refuses to go along with his schemes, stands up to him with strength and moral fortitude, and finally sets free her two protective parents from all their secrets and lies.

Andrea Arnold, Sasha Lane and Riley Keough British director Arnold took home the Cannes jury prize for the third time for her daring American road movie “American Honey” (A24), an empowering coming of age story starring unknown Sasha Lane, making Arnold three for three at the fest after 2006’s “Red Road” and 2009’s “Fish Tank.”

Critics adored the film, which was shaped by the American midwestern landscape as well as the editing room. Arnold’s final film was vastly different from its original script, turning toward the young woman finding her identity as its through-line—Shia Labeouf and Elvis Presley granddaughter Riley Keough (“Mad Max: Fury Road”) offered stalwart support— and was unlike anything else at Cannes this year.

Jodie Foster and Julia Roberts Foster likes bringing smart movies like “Money Monster” and “The Beaver” to Cannes—it’s a film festival for smart people, after all —and she introduced “Money Monster” star Julia Roberts to the Croisette, who walked up the red carpet with bare feet, reminding us all that she has nothing to prove. “We were thrilled for Julia,” Foster told me in our video interview. “George is so excited to show her Cannes, and wanted her to have that moment seeing that sea of photographers.”

Money Monster” was the perfect Cannes out-of-competition studio entry, an entertaining populist Wall Street/media critique for festival gala audiences, with major movie stars for the tapis rouge, press conference and junket for a European market launch. Not surprisingly, the actors are terrific: Clooney plays a glib financial TV guru held hostage by an angry victim of his bad advice (a surprisingly sympathetic Jack O’Connell), who fits him with a bomb vest as punishment. Roberts as Clooney’s producer beams the story live as everyone scrambles to come out of the crisis intact.

As a Hollywood movie star who pushed past conventional women’s roles, scoring four Oscar nominations and two wins (“The Accused,” “The Silence of the Lambs”) and has carried many commercial movies on her own (“Contact,” “Panic Room,” “Flight Plan”), Foster beefed up Roberts’ character to give her more purpose and dimension. In the original script she was more of a technician, but Foster turned her into a competent, strong, active producer who helps Clooney’s character find his strength and unravel the mystery.

Adèle Haenel

In Cannes regulars Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne’s “The Unknown Girl” (Sundance Selects), Haenel plays another gender-neutral character, an excellent, empathetic doctor who is not defined by her relationships or friends; she lives a solitary, monastic life devoted to the well-being of her patients. When she ignores a late-hour doorbell at her private practice and finds out from the police that the young woman was murdered nearby, the doctor embarks on a mission, against the wishes of many including the police, to identify the girl and inform her family of her death.

Kim Min-hee and Kim Tae-ri

With erotic mystery “The Handmaiden” (Amazon) great Korean auteur Park Chan-wook moved the Victorian setting of the novel “Fingersmith” to the 30s period when Japan occupied Korea. Told in two parts from two distinct points-of-view, the lushly mounted movie follows a rich Korean gentlewoman (star Kim Min-hee) and her maidservant (newcomer Kim Tae-ri) who not only fall lustily in love, but plot against their oppressive masters. Park has fashioned a luscious tale of sexual expression and female empowerment.

Elle Fanning

Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Neon Demon” also puts women front and center, led by Elle Fanning, who was 16 when she was cast, 17 when she shot the film, and is now 18. She plays a newcomer to the La fashion scene who discovers that starving models literally eat each other alive. In one memorable scene, when one x-ray known as the bionic woman (because she has altered so much of her body) throws up an eyeball, her best friend pops it into her own mouth. Refn said he wanted to make the women characters primary and the men secondary. While the movie was not a critical hit in Cannes and did not win any prizes, the stylishly transgressive genre exercise could become a smart-horror hit stateside when Amazon Studios releases it in June.

Adriana Ugarte and Emma Suárez These two superb Spanish actresses star as the young and older incarnations of Pedro Almodóvar’s latest female creation, “Julieta” (Sony Pictures Classics). The Spanish auteur’s adaptation of three Alice Munro stories was originally going to star Meryl Streep in an English-language version, in which she would have used makeup to play both roles. This way the movie takes on a decidedly Hitchcockian tone, as the very blonde young Julieta (Ugarte) enjoys mad sex with a stranger on a train, while the older and soberer Julieta (Suárez) is less open, prey to feelings of loss and regret. Why is she estranged from her daughter? What went wrong the day her husband went fishing in the face of an impending storm? This twisted family saga unfolds in cinematic ways that could only come from Almodóvar. Related storiesTop Women Cinematographers Reveal 7 Best Tips for Career SuccessCannes Film Festival Awards 2016Cannes Today: New Talent Emerges »

- Anne Thompson

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Money Monster: the financial thriller that’ll leave you short-changed

23 May 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jodie Foster’s directing comeback – starring George Clooney and Julia Roberts – wants to sock it to capitalism, but it’s just too smug to take seriously

Money Monster is a thriller made by members of the 10% who truly want to stick it to the 1%. It comes on all Bernie Sanders – it even features a closing quote from Sanders-backer Robert Reich – but really, every frame votes Hillary.

Skilfully directed by Jodie Foster – her first outing since she made, rather ill-fatedly, The Beaver with Mel Gibson – and filled with strong performances from Julia Roberts, George Clooney and Jack O’Connell, its main drawback is a screenplay with too many writers that’s a Frankenstein-monster of off-cuts from liberal 1970s classics such as Dog Day Afternoon, Network and Alan J Pakula’s Rollover (and that’s just for starters...).

Continue reading »

- John Patterson

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Blood Father’

21 May 2016 5:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It’s silly to say that actors are the characters they play, but it’s naïve to say that they totally aren’t. That’s what has caused such a problem for Mel Gibson. He’s not the first celebrity to be sunk by bad behavior, but the lingering scandal is that it’s not just the things he said; it’s that everyone heard him on those leaked recordings — heard him screaming and roaring, heard his boiling rants of hatred. How can he go back to playing a movie star we like, pretending that he’s not…that guy? (Who’d believe it?) The answer is: He can do it, just maybe, by playing a movie star who is that guy.

That, more or less, is what he does in “Blood Father.” Directed by Jean-François Richet, who made the lumpy two-part “Mesrine” gangster saga, the picture is an obvious »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Blood Father review: Mel Gibson taps into rage for pulpy thriller

21 May 2016 4:57 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The troubled actor no doubt wrestled with some personal demons to play the recovering alcoholic and ex-con at the center of this B-movie about a father fighting to keep his wayward daughter alive

The first we see of Mel Gibson in Blood Father, his first proper vehicle since 2011’s The Beaver, is in extreme closeup - and it’s not flattering. His skin seems to have taken a proper beating following his well-publicised bout with drug and alcohol addiction. The deep set wrinkles that line his forehead look like battle scars, making him appear significantly older than his 60 years.

Related: Sins, repentance and absolution: Mel Gibson’s second coming

Continue reading »

- Nigel M Smith

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Blood Father review: Mel Gibson taps into rage for pulpy thriller

21 May 2016 4:57 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The troubled actor no doubt wrestled with some personal demons to play the recovering alcoholic and ex-con at the center of this B-movie about a father fighting to keep his wayward daughter alive

The first we see of Mel Gibson in Blood Father, his first proper vehicle since 2011’s The Beaver, is in extreme closeup - and it’s not flattering. His skin seems to have taken a proper beating following his well-publicised bout with drug and alcohol addiction. The deep set wrinkles that line his forehead look like battle scars, making him appear significantly older than his 60 years.

Related: Sins, repentance and absolution: Mel Gibson’s second coming

Continue reading »

- Nigel M Smith

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Foster's Socially Conscious Wall Street Hostage Thriller Suffers from Triteness, Dishonesty

13 May 2016 6:57 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Money Monster' with George Clooney and Jack O'Connell: TV celebrity and unwise investor/hostage taker. 'Money Monster' review: Jodie Foster movie suffers from both qualitative and intellectual disconnect Sometimes there's a difference between what a movie thinks it is and what it actually is. Usually it's a qualitative disconnect, as in “this movie thinks it's exciting but it's actually boring” or “this movie assumes Kevin Hart is funny when, in fact, he's not.” In the case of Money Monster, the divide is also an intellectual versus anti-intellectual one. The fourth film directed by Jodie Foster fancies itself a ripped from the headlines wail from the bottom of the economic ladder. A thriller-cum-exposé into how Wall Street and big media suckered average Americans into following the Pied Pipers of TV's financial punditry class over the cliff into economic ruin. However, the movie we're really getting is »

- Mark Keizer

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Forecast: 'Captain America' Hunts $300M Domestic as 'Money Monster' and 'The Darkness' Hit Theaters

12 May 2016 1:07 PM, PDT | Box Office Mojo | See recent BoxOfficeMojo.com news »

Saturday Am Update: Friday estimates are in and Captain America: Civil War led the charge with an estimated $19.4 million suggesting the film is looking at something around a $73 million second weekend. Coming in second on Friday, but likely to finish third for the weekend, is Sony's Money Monster, which scored an estimated $5 million on Friday along with a "B+" CinemaScore. The studio is projecting a $14.5-15 million weekend. The weekend's other new wide release, Bh Tilt's The Darkness, appears to be right on track if not slightly ahead of expectations. The micro-budgeted horror feature scored an estimated $2.13 million on Friday and is looking at a $5-5.4 million weekend. The film scored a "C" CinemaScore with opening day audiences. You can see our complete chart of Friday estimates right here and we'll be back tomorrow morning with a complete weekend wrap-up. Friday Am Update: Money Monster took in $600,000 from 2,387 locations on Thursday night. »

- Brad Brevet <mail@boxofficemojo.com>

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Cannes 2016: Money Monster review

12 May 2016 9:58 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Money Monster review: Jodie Foster fires hostage drama our way via the Cannes Film Festival, where it plays out-of-competition.

The film marks Foster’s fiest feature directing project in five years/ Here’s our Money Monster review from the Cannes Film Festival 2016.

Money Monster review

Jodie Foster returns to the director’s chair for the fourth time for Money Monster, a film that also caught the eye of the Cannes selection committee, where the film plays out of competition.

George Clooney leads a fairly starry cast as influential Wall Street TV anchor Lee Gates, an animated character who features on a nighty live show on fictional broadcaster Fnn, which we’re assuming stands for Financial News Network. Behind the scenes is Gates’ long-serving, but much suffering director Patty Fenn, who is about to head ‘over the road’ to a rival TV firm – she just hasn’t told Gates yet. Gates »

- Paul Heath

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Jodie Foster: 'I think this is the most risk-averse period in movie history'

12 May 2016 9:35 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

In Cannes, the actor and director of Money Monster addressed the lack of female directors in mainstream Hollywood, saying ‘studio executives are scared’

“I’m not a spokesman for anything – I know nothing,” Jodie Foster declared in Cannes on Wednesday, in front of a room of press attending her Kering Women in Motion talk. But over the course of her hour-long conversation with Variety’s Ramin Setoodeh, she proved herself wrong, passionately advocating on behalf of fellow female directors.

The actor and film-maker is in Cannes to premiere her fourth feature as director, Money Monster, outside of competition. She previously directed 1991’s Little Man Tate, 1995’s Thanksgiving comedy Home for the Holidays and 2011’s Mel Gibson vehicle, The Beaver.

Continue reading »

- Nigel M Smith

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Jodie Foster: Studios Are Scared of Women, Says Blockbuster Culture Harms Movie Industry

12 May 2016 6:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Hollywood’s current obsession with big-budget tentpoles is holding the movie business back when it comes to creating more films by and for women, Jodie Foster said at the Cannes Film Festival on Thursday. Films that once traditionally starred women, such as romantic comedies and mid-budget dramas, are now migrating to television, as studios back superhero movies and special-effects driven action films.

“They’ll make enormous movies tentpole films and they’ll be all in, kind of like a casino bet,” Foster said at Variety and Kering’s Women in Motion talk. “That’s a really dangerous bet.”

Because of the enormous costs, studio executives are hesitant to take chances on new directorial voices. Film is, after all, very much a filmmaker-driven medium. There’s only so much control that a studio chief can maintain from a lot in Hollywood when a picture is being made several zip codes away. »

- Brent Lang

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Jodie Foster’s “Money Monster” is a populist thrill ride

12 May 2016 5:18 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

To this day, it still bugs me that more people didn’t give Jodie Foster’s previous directorial outing The Beaver a chance. I can understand why it was shunned, having had the misfortune of being released at the height of star Mel Gibson’s unpopularity, but still. Foster and the film deserved better. Now, she seeks at the very least some box office redemption with Money Monster, a high profile thriller. Debuting earlier today at the Cannes Film Festival, I’ve already seen the movie and can vouch for it as a solid outing by Foster. It doesn’t really break any new ground, but it’s entertaining, which certainly counts for something. You’ll see what I mean later this week, when the flick hits theaters. The movie is a financial thriller of sorts, set within the world of a hostage situation. Lee Gates (George Clooney) is the »

- Joey Magidson

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Review: Jodie Foster’s ‘Money Monster’ Never Quite Balances Thrills And Journalistic Morality

12 May 2016 3:57 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Returning to feature directing five years after the dark comedy “The Beaver,” Jodie Foster rips into the structures which amplify corporate malfeasance and the forces that effect everyday citizens in “Money Monster.” Sounds like a blast, right? That’s why her latest stars George Clooney as Lee Gates, the charismatic, abrasive and very successful host of […]

The post Review: Jodie Foster’s ‘Money Monster’ Never Quite Balances Thrills And Journalistic Morality appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Russ Fischer

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1-20 of 39 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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