4.9/10
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Gulliver's Travels (2010)

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Travel writer Lemuel Gulliver takes an assignment in Bermuda, but ends up on the island of Liliput, where he towers over its tiny citizens.

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(screenplay), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Darcy Silverman
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King Theodore
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General Edward
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Dan
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Jinks
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Queen Isabelle
Emmanuel Quatra ...
King Leopold
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Prince August
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Nigel Travel Writer
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Foreman
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Blefuscian Captain
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Lilliputian Scientist
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Storyline

Lemuel Gulliver has been working in the mail room of a New York daily newspaper for the past ten years. Afraid to put himself out there, he considers himself a loser, as do all his peers. One day, after having finally had enough, he decides to declare his flame to the beautiful Darcy Silverman, the newspaper's travel editor and one of Gulliver's only friends...only to chicken out at the last minute and instead tell her that he'd like to try his hand at writing a column. Darcy accepts and sends him on an assignment to the Bermuda Triangle. There, Gulliver becomes shipwrecked and ends up on the island of Liliput, where he is twelve taller than the tallest man. For the first time, Gulliver has people looking up to him... Written by Happy_Evil_Dude

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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Something big is going down See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for brief rude humor, mild language and action | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

25 December 2010 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Los viajes de Gulliver  »

Box Office

Budget:

$112,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$6,307,691 (USA) (24 December 2010)

Gross:

$42,776,259 (USA) (8 April 2011)
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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(Dolby 7.1 Surround Sound)|

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Playing a princess, Emily Blunt felt this was her "girliest" role thus far in her career. See more »

Goofs

When Gulliver is inviting Dan from the mail room out for a drink early in film, Gulliver has his right thumb up, pointing to himself, but in the reverse shot of Dan, he has his left thumb up. See more »

Quotes

Lemuel Gulliver: There's no small jobs - just small people.
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Crazy Credits

The end credits are presented as part of newspaper clips from Gulliver's column. Surrounding the credits is actual text from the original novel by Jonathan Swift, and mentions some adventures from the book that are not featured in the movie, such as the encounters with the subhuman "yahoos". See more »

Connections

Features Guitar Hero World Tour (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

SWEET CHILD O'MINE
Written by Steven Adler, Slash (as Saul Hudson), Duff McKagan (as Duff Rose McKagan), Axl Rose and Izzy Stradlin
Performed by Guns N' Roses
Courtesy of Geffen Records
Under License from Universal Music Enterprises
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
There's nothing worth exploring in this traveller's tale
22 December 2010 | by (Singapore) – See all my reviews

It's the holiday season, and everyone around you in a festive mood – or are they?

Well, you may want to count this Scrooge of a reviewer out, because he isn't a firm believer that tis' the season of giving. So when a movie as shamelessly commercial as this comes along, you can bet he is not going to be very kind in his review.

Based on the 18th century novel of the same name, this update sees a slacker mailroom clerk being transported to the land of Lilliput (yes, this is the original name of the mythical land in the novel) after messing up a travel assignment to the Bermuda Triangle. There, the giant (or Beast, as he is affectionately known to the locals), he becomes a hero to the little people, fighting villains and matchmaking a peasant and a princess. When a battle with a petty general goes awry, the roly poly backs out and cowers in fear.

Of course, you know this is only temporary - who would be in the mood for an un-happy ending during the festive season?

The filmmakers have aptly cast Jack Black in the role of Gulliver, given his larger than life personality. This is clearly the comedian's show, seeing how the camera focuses on his every single exaggerated facial expression and body gesture. Black has impressed us with his comedic talents in movies like the surprise hit School of Rock (2003) and the hilarious satire Tropic Thunder (2008). And who can miss his adorable persona in Kung Fu Panda (2008)? In his latest work which he also plays the executive producer role, Black effortlessly pulls of the portrayal of a lovable loser who you cannot bear to dislike.

He is joined by a capable cast including Amanda Peet (2012) who plays his love interest, Jason Segel (I Love You, Man) who plays a Lilliput resident, Emily Blunt (The Wolfman) who plays a Lilliput princess and Billy Connolly (The X Files: I Want to Believe) who plays a Lilliput king. As you have noticed by now, most of the actors play tiny people in this 88 minute movie. They all fare pretty well, but like all holiday movies, this isn't really what the audience is looking out for.

What is in place is the usual numbed down and logic deprived script which will not bother the casual viewer. What's more, since this movie is targeted at the family crowds, there is no need to sophisticate things. Hence, the filmmakers have every reason to throw in mindless pop culture references, ranging from Star Wars' Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker to Titanic's Jack and Rose. Also, you get to see Gulliver inspired posters and billboards which are at most mildly amusing. Unfortunately, these litters of chuckles do not contribute much to the story.

Director Rob Letterman (Monsters vs Aliens) have made use of green screen technology, and in a move that doesn't surprise anyone anymore, 3D technique to bring this tale to the big screen. We are pretty sure that when Jonathan Swift wrote the original novel in 1726, the satire was supposed to bring out certain traits of human nature. After countless adaptations, this message has become a diluted affair with nothing refreshing to offer except a couple of pointless chuckles.


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