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1-20 of 43 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


‘Cheap Thrills’ Director E.L. Katz Begins Filming ‘Small Crimes’!

6 hours ago | bloody-disgusting.com | See recent Bloody-Disgusting.com news »

E.L. Katz, who broke out in a big way with his excellent thriller Cheap Thrills, is now in production on Small Crimes, written by Katz and Macon Blair (Green Room, Blue Ruin), and being produced by, get this, David Lancaster (Drive, Nightcrawler, Whiplash). Two-time Oscar nominee Jacki Weaver (StokerSilver Linings Playbook, Animal Kingdom), Oscar nominee Robert Forster (Jackie Brown) along […] »

- MrDisgusting

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Jacki Weaver, Robert Forster, Others Join E.L. Katz’s ‘Small Crimes’

26 July 2016 1:25 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Exclusive: Two-time Oscar nominee Jacki Weaver (Silver Linings Playbook, Animal Kingdom), Oscar nominee Robert Forster (Jackie Brown) along with Emmy nominees Gary Cole (Veep) and Molly Parker (House of Cards) have joined Game of Thrones’ actor Nikolaj Coster-Waldau in director E.L. Katz's crime thriller, Small Crimes. The Rumble Films productions is being financed by U.K.’s Rooks Nest (The Witch, Obvious Child) and French-based Backup and Paradise City. The film, which… »

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‘Animal Kingdom’: A Family Sit-Down Gets Stressful in Exclusive Video

12 July 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

TNT’s “Animal Kingdom” has made its much anticipated debut, and one thing is for sure: The dubiously incestuous family drama certainly is entertaining. Starring Ellen Barkin and Scott Speedman, the series follows the exploits of a Southern California crime family as they take smash-and-grab jobs further and further. In an exclusive clip from tonight’s episode, the family sits down to discuss — and argue about — their latest venture.

Read More: ‘Animal Kingdom’: Ellen Barkin Gets Incestuous in TNT’s New

According to the official episode description, “When Pope (Shawn Hatosy) tests positive for drugs, Smurf (Ellen Barkin) does what it takes to keep the family intact. Baz (Scott Speedman) gets his brothers to rob a house as part of his larger plan. J (Finn Cole) discovers the plan and faces a moral dilemma.”

While it’s no “Game of Thrones,” (at least not yet), the show’s incestuous »

- Kate Halliwell

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‘Animal Kingdom’: A Family Sit-Down Gets Stressful in Exclusive Video

12 July 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

TNT’s “Animal Kingdom” has made its much anticipated debut, and one thing is for sure: The dubiously incestuous family drama certainly is entertaining. Starring Ellen Barkin and Scott Speedman, the series follows the exploits of a Southern California crime family as they take smash-and-grab jobs further and further. In an exclusive clip from tonight’s episode, the family sits down to discuss — and argue about — their latest venture.

Read More: ‘Animal Kingdom’: Ellen Barkin Gets Incestuous in TNT’s New

According to the official episode description, “When Pope (Shawn Hatosy) tests positive for drugs, Smurf (Ellen Barkin) does what it takes to keep the family intact. Baz (Scott Speedman) gets his brothers to rob a house as part of his larger plan. J (Finn Cole) discovers the plan and faces a moral dilemma.”

While it’s no “Game of Thrones,” (at least not yet), the show’s incestuous »

- Kate Halliwell

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TNT's series redo of David Michôd's Animal Kingdom renewed for second season

7 July 2016 5:45 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Ellen Barkin as Smurf and Finn Cole as J in TNT's Animal Kingdom.

The American remake of.Animal Kingdom.on TNT has found better luck than some other American adaptations of Aussie shows (see:.Rake, Kath and Kim) with a second season given the go-ahead less than a month after the show's premiere.

TNT executive VP for original programming Sarah Aubrey said that Animal Kingdom had "signaled the new tone for TNT dramas and is moving the network in the direction we hoped it would.".

"I'm confident that our strategy of working with high-caliber talent and then getting out of their way will continue to pay off."

Animal Kingdom.premiered June 14 and is currently reaching an average 6.7 million viewers and growing from its launch, according to THR.

The original film's director David Michôd and producer Liz Watts are both credited as executive producers on the series.

Reviews for the American take have been middling, »

- Staff Writer

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‘Angie Tribeca’ & ‘Animal Kingdom’ Score New Seasons At TBS & TNT

6 July 2016 2:42 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

TBS’s “Angie Tribeca” and “Wrecked” and TNT’s new drama “Animal Kingdom” have just been renewed for new seasons. All three shows received early 10-episode renewals for 2017.

The Rashida Jones-starring comedy follows a group of Lapd detectives who handle the “most serious cases.” The series is currently finishing up its second season and will go on for a third. Upon hearing the news, the official “Angie Tribeca” Twitter page posted a celebratory tweet.

And you’re gonna have to find a good couch. See you Season 3 (& the rest of Season 2. Don't forget we're still on.) pic.twitter.com/tSMWYX7aBm

Angie Tribeca (@AngieTribecaTBS) July 6, 2016

Read More: Rashida Jones Takes on ‘Baywatch’ in Exclusive ‘Angie Tribeca’ Video

Rookie series “Wrecked” stars Jessica Lowe, Ginger Gonzaga and Ally Maki and revolves around a diverse group of plane crasher survivors. The first season made its debut last month and has reached »

- Liz Calvario

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‘Angie Tribeca’ & ‘Animal Kingdom’ Score New Seasons At TBS & TNT

6 July 2016 2:42 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

TBS’s “Angie Tribeca” and “Wrecked” and TNT’s new drama “Animal Kingdom” have just been renewed for new seasons. All three shows received early 10-episode renewals for 2017.

The Rashida Jones-starring comedy follows a group of Lapd detectives who handle the “most serious cases.” The series is currently finishing up its second season and will go on for a third. Upon hearing the news, the official “Angie Tribeca” Twitter page posted a celebratory tweet.

And you’re gonna have to find a good couch. See you Season 3 (& the rest of Season 2. Don't forget we're still on.) pic.twitter.com/tSMWYX7aBm

Angie Tribeca (@AngieTribecaTBS) July 6, 2016

Read More: Rashida Jones Takes on ‘Baywatch’ in Exclusive ‘Angie Tribeca’ Video

Rookie series “Wrecked” stars Jessica Lowe, Ginger Gonzaga and Ally Maki and revolves around a diverse group of plane crasher survivors. The first season made its debut last month and has reached »

- Liz Calvario

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Animal Kingdom, Wrecked and Angie Tribeca Renewed by TNT and TBS

6 July 2016 2:02 PM, PDT | TVfanatic | See recent TVfanatic news »

Turner Network media brands TBS and TNT have renewed three original series currently airing on the networks: the critically acclaimed TNT drama Animal Kingdom, the new TBS series Wrecked and the hit TBS comedy Angie Tribeca.

Wrecked ranks among cable's Top 25 scripted series for the year-to-date and is the #1 new cable comedy among adults 18-49.

Angie Tribeca's second season premiere delivered cable's largest increase of adults 18-49 (+41%) for a returning comedy this year.

Animal Kingdom is pulling in a young audience profile and has been on an upward trajectory since its premiere.

Today's renewals mark the latest steps in the ongoing evolution of the networks under TBS and TNT President Kevin Reilly, who has set out to energize both brands and draw in younger audiences.

Since rebranding in January, TBS has premiered and renewed four new comedies: Angie Tribeca, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, The Detour and Wrecked. All »

- Carissa Pavlica

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TNT’s ‘Animal Kingdom,’ TBS Comedies ‘Angie Tribeca’ and ‘Wrecked’ Renewed

6 July 2016 12:36 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Turner networks TNT and TBS have handed out three series renewals, it was announced Wednesday.

TNT’s freshman drama “Animal Kingdom,” TBS’ new comedy “Wrecked” and sophomore laffer “Angie Tribeca” have all been renewed for new seasons.

Since rebranding in January, TBS has premiered and renewed four new comedies: “Angie Tribeca,” “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee,” “The Detour” and “Wrecked.” All four rank among the year’s Top 10 new cable comedies among adults 18-49, with “Wrecked” and “The Detour” topping the chart.

“A year ago we began reinventing TBS, and thanks to the incredible talent behind these shows, we’ve come a long way in a very short amount of time,” said Brett Weitz, executive vice president of original programming for TBS. “Pulling the trigger on renewals early allows us to build on our success by giving fans new seasons more quickly.”

“‘Animal Kingdom’ has signaled the new tone for TNT dramas and is moving the network »

- Laura Prudom

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‘Ice Age: Collision Course’ Review Roundup: Critics Mostly Cold on Toon Sequel

19 June 2016 1:23 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The newest “Ice Age” is out next month, and at least a couple critics seem to wish the franchise would hurry up and go extinct. Writing for The Wrap, Alonso Duralde opens his review by calling the series as a whole “so blandly forgettable that parents could probably show an earlier entry to their kids and pretend it’s the new one.” He continues, writing that the fifth installment in the prehistoric saga lacks “laughs, energy and sharp edges in equal degrees to its predecessors” and “takes huge strides in the hotly-contested race to be 2016’s Most Irrelevant Sequel.”

Read More: Fox Schedules Blue Sky Special “Ice Age: The Great Egg-Scapade”

Michael Rechtshaffen isn’t much kinder in the Hollywood Reporter, noting that “it’s as if co-directors Michael Thurmeier and Galen Tan Chu, both veterans of the ‘Ice Age’ franchise, sensed that there was essentially nowhere left to »

- Michael Nordine

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Jacki Weaver Says That Hollywood Isn’t Ageist: ’60 is the new 40′

18 June 2016 2:16 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Jacki Weaver, known for her breakout role in “Animal Kingdom,” recently spoke out about how the industry has been so welcoming to her. As opposed to many actresses who have spoken out about the lack of roles or how their looks affect their jobs, the 69-year-old Australian actress is declaring that “60 is the new 40.”

“There are lots of great roles for women my age,” she told The Daily Telegraph, adding that she hasn’t faced any opposition from Hollywood. “I have never come across any of that. Remember, I am in my late-60s and under 5ft, so maybe those sorts of things don’t apply to someone like me. Perhaps it happens to younger actors.”

Read More: Adult Swim: Out of 47 Shows On their Current Slate, None Have Been Created By Women

“But, in my opinion, sometimes you get a job and sometimes you miss out,” she continued. »

- Liz Calvario

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‘Animal Kingdom’ Review: Adaptation of Australian Thriller Has More Bark Than Bite

14 June 2016 1:34 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Animal Kingdom” is an odd beast. Adapted from the arresting 2010 Australian thriller, this TNT offering contains glimpses of the gritty, compelling series it could be, but judged on its first three episodes, this tale of a dysfunctional Southern California crime family is more bark than bite. Highlighted by a deliciously sleazy turn from Ellen Barkin, “Animal Kingdom” slowly finds its footing, but it remains to be seen whether the characters’ low-life machinations will produce sufficient drama to justify audiences’ patience. Kicking off June 14 with a two-hour premiere, the series begins as writer-director David Michôd’s film did. Moody teen J (Finn. »

- Tim Grierson

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‘BrainDead’ Review Roundup: Critics Mild on Mary Elizabeth Winstead’s ‘Goofy’ Horror-Political Series

14 June 2016 11:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

BrainDead” is a new comedic political thriller from “The Good Wife” creators, Robert and Michelle King, that premiered on Monday, June 13. The series follows Laurel Healy (Mary Elizabeth WInstead), a young fresh-faced Hill staffer who gets her first job in Washington D.C. and discovers that aliens have spawned on Earth and are feeding on the brains of Congressmen and other federal employees. After its debut, it looks as if critics are 50/50 on the new CBS series.

Maureen Ryan from Variety writes, “‘BrainDead’ doesn’t lack braiiins, exactly — it lacks a spine. The frustrating thing about this comedic drama is that it takes a breezy ‘a pox on both their houses’ approach to telling its story….[but] takes no position at all regarding who’s right and wrong about anything.” She also explains how the show feels “dated” and “bland and incomplete.”

Read More: ‘Braindead’ Trailer: Mary Elizabeth Winstead Leads Insane New CBS Political Comedy From ‘Good Wife’ Team

The Hollywood Reporter’s Daniel Fienberg’s bottom line was, “More ‘InspirationDead’ than ‘BrainDead.’” The critic wasn’t a fan of the show writing, “There are enough likable actors and easily digestible bipartisan political jabs here for occasional amusement, but it’s sometimes exhausting to watch a show trying this hard for such limited returns.” Adding that it is “a show that suffers from a lack of creativity and inspiration.”

“The satire is as thin as Donald Trump’s skin. And the pilot commits the sin of a wimpy climax,” describes Entertainment Weekly’s Jeff Jensen giving it an overall score of B. “It ends on a major reversal of fortune and an ominous development, but neither land with much force. I wasn’t left super-confident that the Kings have enough imagination to sustain this enterprise. But I liked it enough to find out. The cast is spunky and appealing, the writing is witty, the tone is light, the brain poop thing made me laugh.” 

Read More: ‘Animal Kingdom’ Review Roundup: Critics Are Mixed on the TV Adaptation of David Michôd’s Acclaimed Crime Drama

On the other hand, Michael E. Ross of The Wrap seemed like he was pleased by the show’s concept, calling it a “promisingly original, a deft combination of the tropes of a horror movie, the pace of a forensic drama and the barbs of a political satire that’s thoroughly of the moment.” He adds that fans of the Kings’s will be in for a treat, “With our presumptively surreal political campaign underway, it takes a real stroke of genius — or madness, or a little of both — to come up with a fresh view of the circus of our national politics.”

BrainDead” airs Mondays at 10pm on CBS.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories6 New Summer TV Shows You Need To Know'Braindead' Trailer: Mary Elizabeth Winstead Leads Insane New CBS Political Comedy From 'Good Wife' TeamIt Was a Great Weekend for Women at the Box Office »

- Liz Calvario

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‘BrainDead’ Review Roundup: Critics Mild on Mary Elizabeth Winstead’s ‘Goofy’ Horror-Political Series

14 June 2016 11:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

BrainDead” is a new comedic political thriller from “The Good Wife” creators, Robert and Michelle King, that premiered on Monday, June 13. The series follows Laurel Healy (Mary Elizabeth WInstead), a young fresh-faced Hill staffer who gets her first job in Washington D.C. and discovers that aliens have spawned on Earth and are feeding on the brains of Congressmen and other federal employees. After its debut, it looks as if critics are 50/50 on the new CBS series.

Maureen Ryan from Variety writes, “‘BrainDead’ doesn’t lack braiiins, exactly — it lacks a spine. The frustrating thing about this comedic drama is that it takes a breezy ‘a pox on both their houses’ approach to telling its story….[but] takes no position at all regarding who’s right and wrong about anything.” She also explains how the show feels “dated” and “bland and incomplete.”

Read More: ‘Braindead’ Trailer: Mary Elizabeth Winstead Leads Insane New CBS Political Comedy From ‘Good Wife’ Team

The Hollywood Reporter’s Daniel Fienberg’s bottom line was, “More ‘InspirationDead’ than ‘BrainDead.’” The critic wasn’t a fan of the show writing, “There are enough likable actors and easily digestible bipartisan political jabs here for occasional amusement, but it’s sometimes exhausting to watch a show trying this hard for such limited returns.” Adding that it is “a show that suffers from a lack of creativity and inspiration.”

“The satire is as thin as Donald Trump’s skin. And the pilot commits the sin of a wimpy climax,” describes Entertainment Weekly’s Jeff Jensen giving it an overall score of B. “It ends on a major reversal of fortune and an ominous development, but neither land with much force. I wasn’t left super-confident that the Kings have enough imagination to sustain this enterprise. But I liked it enough to find out. The cast is spunky and appealing, the writing is witty, the tone is light, the brain poop thing made me laugh.” 

Read More: ‘Animal Kingdom’ Review Roundup: Critics Are Mixed on the TV Adaptation of David Michôd’s Acclaimed Crime Drama

On the other hand, Michael E. Ross of The Wrap seemed like he was pleased by the show’s concept, calling it a “promisingly original, a deft combination of the tropes of a horror movie, the pace of a forensic drama and the barbs of a political satire that’s thoroughly of the moment.” He adds that fans of the Kings’s will be in for a treat, “With our presumptively surreal political campaign underway, it takes a real stroke of genius — or madness, or a little of both — to come up with a fresh view of the circus of our national politics.”

BrainDead” airs Mondays at 10pm on CBS.

Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Related stories6 New Summer TV Shows You Need To Know'Braindead' Trailer: Mary Elizabeth Winstead Leads Insane New CBS Political Comedy From 'Good Wife' TeamIt Was a Great Weekend for Women at the Box Office »

- Liz Calvario

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13 great modern thriller directors

14 June 2016 9:59 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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They’ve made some of the best thrillers of the past six years. We list some of the best modern thriller directors currently working...

Director Guillermo del Toro once described suspense as being about the withholding of information: either a character knows something the audience doesn’t know, or the audience knows something the character doesn’t. That’s a deliciously simple way of describing something that some filmmakers often find difficult to achieve: keeping viewers on the edges of their seats.

The best thrillers leave us scanning the screen with anticipation. They invite us to guess what happens next, but then delight in thwarting expectations. We can all name the great thriller filmmakers of the past - Alfred Hitchcock, Carol Reed, Brian De Palma - but what about the current crop of directors? Here’s our pick of the filmmakers who’ve made some great modern thrillers over the past six years - that is, between the year 2010 and the present.

Jeremy Saulnier - Blue Ruin, Green Room

To think there was once a time when Jeremy Saulnier was seriously quitting the film business.

“To be honest," Saulner told us back in 2014, “Macon and I had really given up on our quest to break into the industry and become legitimate filmmakers. So what we were trying to do with Blue Ruin was archive our 20 year arc and bring it to a close. Really just revisit our stomping grounds and use locations that were near and dear to us and build a narrative out of that.”

Maybe this personal touch explains at least partly why Blue Ruin wound up getting so much attention in Cannes in 2013, signalling not the end of Saulnier and his star Macon Blair’s career, but a brand new chapter. But then again, there’s more than just hand-crafted intimacy in Saulnier’s revenge tale; there’s also its lean, minimal storytelling and the brilliance of its characterisation. Blue Ruin is such an effective thriller because its protagonist is so atypical: sad-eyed, inexperienced with guns, somewhat soft around the edges, Macon Blair’s central character is far from your typical righteous avenger.

Green Room, which emerged in the UK this year, explores a similar clash between very ordinary people and extraordinary violence. A young punk band shout about anarchy and aggression on stage, but they quickly find themselves out of their depth when they’re cornered by a group of bloodthirsty neo-Nazis. In Saulnier’s films, grubby, unseemly locations are matched by often beautiful locked-off shots. Familiar thriller trappings are contrasted by twists of fortune that are often shocking.

Denis Villeneuve - Sicario, Prisoners

Here’s one of those directors who can pack an overwhelming sense of dread in a single image: in Sicario, his searing drug-war thriller from last year, it was the sight of tiny specks of dust falling in the light scything through a window. That single shot proved to be the calm before the storm, as Villeneuve unleashed a salvo of blood-curdling events: an attempted FBI raid on a building gone horribly awry. And this, I think, is the brilliance of Villeneuve’s direction, and why he’s so good at directing thrillers like Sicario or 2013’s superb Prisoners - he understands the rhythm of storytelling, and how scenes of quiet can generate almost unbearable tension.

Another case in point: the highway sequence in Sicario, where Emily Blunt’s FBI agent is stuck in a traffic jam outside one of the most violent cities in the world. Villeneueve makes us feel the stifling heat and the claustrophobia; something nasty’s going to happen, we know that - but it’s the sense of anticipation which makes for such an unforgettable scene.

Prisoners hews closely to the template of a modern mystery thriller, but it’s once again enriched by Villeneuve’s expert pacing and the performances he gets out of his actors. Hugh Jackman’s seldom been better as a father on the hunt for his missing child, while Jake Gyllenhaal mesmerises as a cop scarred by his own private traumas.

Lynne Ramsay - We Need To Talk About Kevin

Ramsay’s We Need To Talk About Kevin may be the most effective psychological thriller of recent years. About the difficult relationship between a mother (Tilda Swinton) and her distant, possibly sociopathic son (Ezra Miller), Ramsay’s film is masterfully told from beginning to end - which is impressive, given that the source novel by Lionel Shriver is told via a series of letters. Ramsay takes the raw material from the book and crafts something cinematic and highly disturbing: a study of guilt, sorrow and recrimination. Tension bubbles even in casual conversations around the dinner table. Miller is an eerie, cold-eyed blank. Swinton is peerless. One scene, in which Swinton’s mother comes home in the dead of night, is unforgettable. Here’s hoping Ramsay returns with another feature film very soon.

Morten Tyldum - Headhunters

All kinds of thrillers have emerged from Scandinavia over the past few years, whether on the large or small screen or in book form. Morten Tyldum’s Headhunters is among the very best of them. The fast-paced and deliriously funny story of an art thief who steals a painting from the wrong guy, Headhunters launched Tyldum on an international stage - Alan Turing drama The Imitation Game followed, and the Sony sci-fi film Passengers is up next. It isn’t hard to see why, either: Headhunters shows off Tyldum’s mastery of pace and tone, as his pulp tale hurtles from intense chase scenes to laugh-out-loud black comedy.

Joel Edgerton - The Gift

Granted, Joel Edgerton’s better known as an actor, having turned in some superb performances in the likes of Warrior, Zero Dark Thirty and Warror. But with a single film - The Gift, which he wrote, directed, produced and starred in - Edgerton established himself as a thriller filmmaker of real promise. About a successful, happily married couple whose lives are greatly affected by an old face from the husband’s past, The Gift is an engrossing, unsettling movie with superb performances from Jason Bateman and Rebecca Hall as well as Edgerton.

A riff on the ‘killer in our midst’ thrillers of the 80s and 90s - The Stepfather, The Hand That Rocks The Cradle and so on - The Gift is all the more effective because of its restraint. We’re never quite sure who the villain of the piece is, at least at first - and Edgerton’s use of the camera leaves us wrong-footed at every turn. The world arguably needs more thrillers from Joel Edgerton.

If you haven’t seen The Gift yet, we’d urge you to track it down.

David Michod - Animal Kingdom

The criminals at play in this true-life crime thriller are all the more chilling because they’re so mundane - a bunch of low-level thieves, murderers and gangsters who prowl around the rougher parts of Melbourne, Australia. Writer-director David Michod spent years developing Animal Kingdom, and it was worth the effort: it’s an intense, engrossing film, for sure, but it’s also a believable glimpse of the worst of human nature. Ben Mendelsohn and Jacki Weaver play villains of different kinds; the latter a manipulative grandmother who looks over her brood of criminals, the former a spiteful thief. Crafting moments of incredible tension from simple exchanges, Michod launched himself as a formidable talent with this feature debut.

Ben Affleck - The Town, Argo

Affleck’s period drama-thriller Argo won all kinds of awards, but we’d argue his earlier thrillers were equally well made. Gone Baby Gone was a confident debut and an economical adaptation of Dennis LeHane’s novel. The Town, released in 2010, was a heist thriller that made the most of its Boston setting. One of its key scenes - a bank robbery in which the thieves wear a range of bizarre outfits, including a nun’s habit - is masterfully staged. With Affleck capable of teasing out great performances from his actors and staging effective set-pieces, it’s hardly surprising he’s so heavily involved in making at least one Batman movie for Warner - as well as playing the hero behind the mask.

Anton Corbijn - The American, A Most Wanted Man

The quiet, almost meditative tone of Anton Corbijn’s movies mean they aren’t necessarily to everyone’s taste, but they’re visually arresting and almost seductive in their rhythm and attention to detail. Already a celebrated photographer, Corbijn successfully crossed over into filmmaking with Control, an exquisitely-made drama about Joy Division lead singer Ian Curtis. Corbijn took a markedly different direction with The American, a thriller about an ageing contract killer (George Clooney) who hides out in a small Italian town west of Rome. Inevitably, trouble eventually comes calling.

Corbijn’s direction remains gripping because he doesn’t give us huge action scenes to puncture the tension. We can sense the capacity for violence coiled up beneath the hitman’s calm exterior, and Corbijn makes sure we only see rare flashes of that toughness - right up until the superbly-staged climax.

A Most Wanted Man, based on the novel by John le Carre, is a similarly astute study of an isolated yet fascinating character - in this instance, the world-weary German intelligence agent Gunther Bachmann, brilliantly played by Philip Seymour Hoffman. Tragically, the film proved to be one of the last before Hoffman’s death in 2014.

Paul Greengrass - Green Zone, Captain Phillips

Mention Greengrass’ name, and the director’s frequent use of handheld cameras might immediately spring to mind. But time and again, Greengrass has proved a master of his own personal approach - you only have to look at the muddled, migraine-inducing films of his imitators to see how good a director Greengrass is. Part of the filmmakers’ visual language rather than a gimmick, Greengrass’ camera placement puts the viewer in the middle of the story, whether it’s an amnesiac agent on the run (his Bourne films) or on a hijacked aircraft (the harrowing United 93). While not a huge hit, Green Zone was an intense and intelligent thriller set in occupied Iraq. The acclaimed Captain Phillips, meanwhile, was a perfect showcase for Greengrass’ ability to fuse realism and suspense; the true story of a merchant vessel hijacked by Somali pirates, it is, to quote Greengrass himself, “a contemporary crime story.”

John Hillcoat - Lawless, Triple 9

We can’t help thinking that, with a better marketing push behind it, Triple 9 could have been a much bigger hit when it appeared in cinemas earlier this year. It has a great cast - Chiwetel Ejiofor, Norman Reedus, Anthony Mackie and Aaron Paul as a group of seasoned thieves, Kate Winslet cast against type as a gangland boss - and its heist plot rattles along like an express train.

Hillcoat seems to have the western genre pulsing through his veins, and he excels at creating worlds that are desolate and all-enveloping, whether his subjects are period pieces (The Proposition, Lawless) or post-apocalyptic dramas (The Road). Triple 9 sees Hillcoat make an urban western that is both classic noir and entirely contemporary; his use of real cops and residents around the film’s Atlanta location give his heightened story a grounding that is believable in the moment. Nowhere is this more in evidence than in the scene in which Casey Affleck’s cop breaches a building while hunkered down behind a bullet-proof shield. Hillcoat places us right there in the scene with Affleck and the cops sneaking into the building behind him; we sense the claustrophobia and vulnerability.

Hillcoat explained to us in February that this sequence wasn’t initially written this way in the original script; it changed when the director and his team discovered how real-world cops protect themselves in real-world situations. In Triple 9, research and great filmmaking combine to make an unforgettably intense thriller.

Jim Mickel - Cold In July

Seemingly inspired by such neo-Noir thrillers as Red Rock West and Blood Simple, 2014‘s Cold In July is a genre gem from director Jim Mickle (Stake Land, We Are What We Are). Michael C Hall plays an ordinary guy in 80s America who shoots an intruder who breaks into his home, and becomes drawn into a moody conspiracy that takes in crooked cops, porn and a private eye (who's also keen pig-rearer) played by Don Johnson. Constantly shifting between tones, Mickel’s thriller refuses to stick to genre expectations. In one scene, after Hall shoots the burglar dead, Mickel’s camera lingers over the protagonist as he cleans up the blood and glass. It’s touches like these that make Cold In July far more than a typical thriller.

Mickel’s teaming up with Sylvester Stallone next; we’re intrigued to see what that partnership produces.

Martin Scorsese - Shutter Island

As a filmmaker, Scorsese needs no introduction. As a director of thrillers, he’s in a class of his own: from Taxi Driver via the febrile remake of Cape Fear to the sorely underrated Bringing Out The Dead, his films are full of suspense and the threat of violence. Shutter Island, based on the Dennis LeHane novel of the same name, saw Scorsese plunge eagerly into neo-noir territory. A murder mystery set in a mental institution on the titular Shutter Island, its atmosphere is thick with menace. Like a combination of Robin Hardy's The Wicker Man and Adrian Lyne’s cult classic Jacob’s Ladder, Shutter Island’s one of those stories where we never know who we can trust - even the protagonist, played by Leonardo DiCaprio.

David Fincher - The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, Gone Girl

After the trial by fire that was Alien 3, David Fincher found his footing in the 90s with such hits as Seven and The Game. In an era where thrillers were in much greater abundance, from the middling to the very good, Seven in particular stood out as a genre classic: smartly written, disturbing, repulsive and yet captivating to look at all at once. Fincher’s affinity for weaving atmospheric thrillers continued into the 2010s, first with The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, a superb retelling of Stieg Larsson’s book which didn’t quite find the appreciative audience deserved, and Gone Girl, an even better movie which - thankfully - became a hit.

Based on Gillian Flynn’s novel (and adapted by the author herself), Gone Girl is both a gripping thriller and a thoroughly twisted relationship drama. Fincher’s mastery of the genre is all here: his millimetre-perfect composition, seamless touches of CGI and subtle yet effective uses of colour and shadow. While not a straight-up masterpiece like the period thriller Zodiac, Gone Girl is still a glossy, smart and blackly funny yarn in the Hitchcock tradition. If there’s one master of the modern thriller currently working, it has to be Fincher.

See related  John Hillcoat interview: Triple 9, crime, fear of comic geniuses Jim Mickle interview: Cold In July, thrillers, Argento Jeremy Saulnier interview: Green Room, John Carpenter Jeremy Saulnier interview: making Blue Ruin & good thrillers Denis Villeneuve interview: Sicario, Kurosawa, sci-fi, ugly poetry Morten Tyldum interview: The Imitation Game, Cumberbatch, Headhunters Paul Greengrass interview: Captain Phillips & crime stories Movies Feature Ryan Lambie thrillers 15 Jun 2016 - 06:11 Cold In July Triple 9 Shutter Island Gone Girl David Fincher Martin Scorsese John Hillcoat Directors thrillers movies »

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‘Animal Kingdom’: Ellen Barkin Gets Incestuous in TNT’s New Drama

13 June 2016 6:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Late in the second episode of TNT’s new drama “Animal Kingdom,” Ellen Barkin, who plays the family matriarch nicknamed “Smurf,” stares at out the window at her naked son, standing next to a swimming pool with his exposed butt shimmering in the moonlight.

Inappropriate? Absolutely. Executive producer Jonathan Lisco likes to use the term “emotional incest” to describe the mother/son dynamic at the heart of “Animal Kingdom,” which premieres Tuesday night on TNT.

Based on the 2010 Australian film that was written and directed by David Michôd, Lisco and fellow executive producer John Wells have focused on Barkin’s provocative character and the unhealthy hold she wields over her four dangerous sons.

Read More: Watch: It’s All About Family In New Trailer For TNT’s ‘Animal Kingdom’ TV Series

“You can imagine that she showered with one of these kids until he was 9 or 10 or 11,” Lisco told IndieWire. “She’s raised these guys with love, but also with some disturbingly leaky boundaries. She’s now infantilized these boys, even into adulthood, to the point where her house is still the honey pot. They are repelled by her affection, at the same time that they perversely crave it.”

Lisco said the Cody clan’s dysfunctional dynamic is what drew him to the series. “They would love to tell Smurf to go jump in a lake, but at the same time, they’ve been raised in such a way where her approval and her affection is so important to their identity that they’re having a hard to extricating themselves from the gravity of the hold that she has over them.”

Scott Speedman, Shawn Hatosy, Ben Robson and Jake Weary play Barkin’s boys, hard-bodied criminals who also harbor an “addicting” and “conflicted” brotherhood. “We’re going to try and force the audience’s expectations about who’s good, who’s stable, and who’s actually the most moral in the show,” Lisco said. “We’re not apologizing at all for our characters. I’m not saying to lean forward and ever necessarily feel sorry for them, but if you do find yourself relating to them, I think that will be a great success, because you’ll catch yourself and you’ll have to remind yourself that this is indeed a family of thieves.”

Read More: ‘Animal Kingdom’ Review Roundup

The audience’s entry point is through teenager “J” (Finn Cole), who moves in with the Cody family after his mother – Smurf’s estranged daughter – dies of an overdose. But even “J” may not be who he seems. “He’s actually not purely innocent,” Lisco said. “Don’t forget, he is the son of an ex-communicated member of this family, so this is in his blood. We want to see how he evolves morally and whether or not he’s going to take things into his own hands.”

Like many film adaptations, Lisco said he wanted to take the original DNA of “Animal Kingdom” and expand it: “Anyone who’s seen David Michôd’s memorable film knows that it’s not just about a family of bank robbers who pull jobs and run from the cops… [We’re not] trying to sensationalize or try to do any ‘TV-fied’ version of the movie.”

Also, Lisco added that the TV show “can’t really follow the plot of the feature film because, spoiler alert: our cast will be pretty decimated way too soon if you follow the plot line of the movie. What we’re going to do is, we hope, go brick by brick and look at character in a much more.”

Lisco and his writing team have already mapped out “Animal Kingdom’s” character paths for Season 1 and the first half of Season 2. “And even some bigger notions for where we land in season 3,” he added.

Now set in Oceanside, Calif., north of San Diego, “Animal Kingdom’s” plot will include elements of the law enforcement and the threat of the Cody family’s capture. But the show’s initial 10-episode first season is really about the family – and, specifically, Smurf’s origins story.

“We have a whole backstory for her in which she was living in a car with her mother when she was young, and she saw her mom essentially not need men,” Lisco said. “The mother raised Smurf with the sense that men were gullible idiots, and so when she started to mature, she decided to use her sexuality in ways that would control her own life. And what better way to do that than to supplant the men in her life in some ways with people that she could forge out of her own loins and kick the fathers to the curb?”

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Related stories'Animal Kingdom' Review Roundup: Critics Are Mixed on the TV Adaptation of David Michôd's Acclaimed Crime DramaReview: 'Animal Kingdom' Season 1 Honors the Film, But Lacks the Dynamic That Made It GreatTribeca Review: TNT's 'Animal Kingdom' Starring Ellen Barkin, Scott Speedman And Shawn Hatosy »

- Michael Schneider

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'Animal Kingdom': Everything You Need to Know

10 June 2016 10:04 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

The family that slays together stays together" — it's a phrase might as well be inscribed in Latin on the Cody clan's crest. Three generations of burglars and thieves come together under one roof on TNT's rough-hewn new drama Animal Kingdom (an Americanized adaptation of the 2010 Australian crime thriller) and precious little is off-limits: the kids blow lines of coke in front of their elders, the oldest son delivers an extended angry tirade to his relatives while hanging dong, and if someone gets bumped off during a messy jewel heist, you »

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‘Animal Kingdom’ Review: TNT Crime Family Adaptation Gritty But Gratuitous

9 June 2016 6:29 PM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Debuting on June 14 with a two-hour premiere on TNT, Animal Kingdom sadly is one of those adaptations that just doesn't work. Whereas the 2010 Australian film starring Ben Mendelsohn, Joel Edgerton and Oscar nominee Jacki Weaver about a matriarch-run Melbourne crime family was very good, the SoCal-set small-screen series from John Wells and Jonathan Lisco pulls too dramatic many punches and ends up being merely gratuitous With Ellen Barkin as boss mama "Smurf" Cody, Scott… »

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Animal Kingdom: Ellen Barkin is One Bad Mother in TNT’s Sexy New Drama

26 May 2016 5:03 PM, PDT | ChannelGuideMag | See recent ChannelGuideMag news »

Ellen Barkin is 62. Sixty. Two. Trust me, you’re going to need to remind yourself of that mere moments into Animal Kingdom, TNT’s scorching, action-packed new drama based on the critically acclaimed 2010 Australian film starring Guy Pearce, Jacki Weaver and Blindspot’s Sullivan Stapleton. Barkin — all tousled locks, burnished skin and plump pout — also rocks skyscraper heels, skinny jeans and plunging tanks like a boss as Janine “Smurf” Cody, matriarch of a crime family that is literally family. Though Smurf sits out the actual heists that have made her crew filthy rich, she rules her grown sons — … Continue reading →

The post Animal Kingdom: Ellen Barkin is One Bad Mother in TNT’s Sexy New Drama appeared first on Channel Guide Magazine. »

- Lori Acken

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Watch an 11-minute extended preview of TNT’s Animal Kingdom TV series

24 May 2016 11:57 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Ahead of its hotly-anticipated premiere next month, TNT has released an extended trailer for its upcoming series Animal Kingdom, a gritty and visceral new crime drama in the vein of hit TV shows such as Sons of Anarchy and Fargo.

Inspired by David Michôd’s cult 2010 Australian film of the same name, Animal Kingdom stars Emmy and Tony Winner Ellen Barkin (Sea of Love) in the role of Janine ‘Smurf’ Cody (played by Oscar-nominee Jacki Weaver in the original movie). Smurf is the fierce and emotionally manipulative matriarch of the Cody family, an outlaw clan living an adrenaline-fueled, indulgent lifestyle in Southern California.

Executive produced by John Wells (ER, The West Wing) and Jonathan Lisco (Southland, Halt and Catch Fire), Animal Kingdom sees Barkin joined by a stellar supporting cast that includes Scott Speedman, Shawn Hatosy, Ben Robson, Jake Weary, Finn Cole, Daniella Alonso and Molly Gordon.

Check out an eleven-minute preview here… »

- Gary Collinson

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