The Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska is home to the Kvichak and Nushagak rivers, the two most prolific sockeye salmon runs left in the world. Two mining companies, Northern Dynasty ... See full summary »
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The Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska is home to the Kvichak and Nushagak rivers, the two most prolific sockeye salmon runs left in the world. Two mining companies, Northern Dynasty Minerals and Anglo American, have proposed an open-pit and under-ground mine at the headwaters of the two rivers. The area is the second largest deposit of copper, gold and molybdenum ever discovered and has an estimated value of more than $300 billion. Despite promises of a clean project by mining officials, the accident-plagued history of hard rock mining has wrought one of the biggest land use issues Alaska has ever faced. Red Gold is our attempt to give a face to the issue, and give a voice to the people of Bristol Bay who depend on this extraordinary fishery. We set out to create a different kind of environmental documentary--one that gives all sides a chance to be seen and heard. Red Gold is more about the place and its people than the facts and numbers. For the first time, Bristol Bay's ... Written by Felt Soul Media

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24 May 2008 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Save Bristol Bay
7 November 2008 | by (NYC, United States) – See all my reviews

This is an amazing film, capturing a community virtually untouched by the march of time as it faces the threat of an open pit copper mine in their very fragile and unique environment. The imagery, music and honesty of the characters – not to mention the fish – pulls you in and one can't help but long for simpler times; wondering what we could possibly manufacture from the copper that could ever justify such destruction. So much of our modern economy works by removing us from the site of damage or abuse that we don't see or feel it in a meaningful way. Red Gold is a small drop in a growing river to help open our eyes and affect change.


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