5.7/10
11,535
25 user 54 critic

A.C.O.D. (2013)

R | | Comedy | 23 January 2013 (USA)
Trailer
2:31 | Trailer

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

A grown man caught in the crossfire of his parents' 15-year divorce discovers he was unknowingly part of a study on divorced children and is enlisted in a follow-up years later, which wreaks new havoc on his family.

Director:

1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Gary
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Kieko
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Margo
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Tyler
Valerie Payton ...
Etta
Gavin Plunkett ...
Evan (as John Gavin Alexander Plunkett)
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Emily (as Isabella Zentkovic)
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Storyline

A.C.O.D. follows a seemingly well-adjusted Adult Child of Divorce (Adam Scott) who is forced to revisit the chaos of his parents' (Catherine O'Hara and Richard Jenkins) bitter divorce all over again after his younger brother (Clark Duke) decides to get married. Written by The Film Arcade

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

He's about to ruin a perfectly good divorce.

Genres:

Comedy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and brief sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

| |  »

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 January 2013 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Adult Children of Divorce  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$19,001, 4 October 2013, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$172,344, 3 November 2013
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The last name of Trey's fiance is Kobayashi. This is the name for the Starfleet training exercise designed to test the character of cadets in the command track at Starfleet Academy. The Kobayashi Maru test was first depicted in the opening scene of the film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and also appears in the 2009 film Star Trek. Screenwriter Jack B. Sowards is credited with inventing the test, naming it after a friend whose last name was Kobayashi.[1] The test's name is occasionally used among Star Trek fans or those familiar with the series to describe a no-win scenario, or a solution that involves redefining the problem and testing one's character. See more »

Goofs

(At around 29 minutes.) Trey and Kieko are going over the seating chart for their wedding. When Carter enters, Trey presents his idea about where to seat their parents. The tables that Trey pulls to the center of the chart are colored with white guests and black. After the brief conversation, Carter reaches across and separates the same two tables. This time, both tables from before are now the same and colored with only white guests. See more »

Crazy Credits

On-screen credits are repeated for Brandon Tonner-Connolly, the first time as Property Master, and the second time as Propmaster. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Tonight Show with Jay Leno: Episode #22.2 (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Eeny Meany
Written and Performed by Jim Noir
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User Reviews

 
A few funny moments, but too clearly a personal catharsis
8 February 2014 | by See all my reviews

As I started watching this movie, it became very obvious that this was a very personal, cathartic movie. I have no problem with that, it's done all the time--but what's important, interesting, funny, and meaningful to the writer/director, doesn't always translate into something meaningful to the viewer unless there is far more skill in the storytelling. And that is what I think this movie lacked.

The plot simply covers the story of a a kid named Carter (and his younger brother Trey) who's father was a philanderer as a husband, as well as fairly cold and distant as a father. The father and mother haven't spoken for 20 years and the father has gone through several other step moms over those years.

I'm sure the "seminal" moment of Carter's 9th birthday was a huge deal to writer, but it was thrust at us so quickly at the beginning of the movie that we didn't have time for any background/setup to even know or care what was going on. To me, that scene which was apparently so pivotal ended up a throwaway scene because the writer seemed so eager to tell it that he told it too soon without any context whatsoever.

So we fast forward to Carter's now-successful (at least career-wise) life. There are a lot of funny moments here, but nothing we couldn't see in a half-hour sitcom. But the road the movie takes us down is a bit meandering and it seems very clear that we're going to have some sort of too-neatly wrapped up happy ending designed to close every loose end with a perfect situation and end all the pain of all the children who've gone through this situation.

To me, it just smacked too much of someone dumping his messed-up life on us and his wish of what could have been. It didn't make for an entertaining movie. Maybe a half-hour episode of Trophy Wife or something would have been a better venue for this story. Jimo


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