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A future archivist looks at old footage from the year 2008 to understand why humankind failed to address climate change.

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
The Archivist
Jeh Wadia ...
Himself
Alvin DuVernay ...
Himself
Layefa Malini ...
Herself
Jamila Bayyoud ...
Herself
Piers Guy ...
Himself
Lisa Guy ...
Herself
Fernand Pareau ...
Himself
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Himself (voice)
...
Herself
...
Himself - Author, Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet
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Storyline

This ambitious documentary/drama/animation hybrid stars Pete Postlethwaite as an archivist in the devastated world of the future, asking the question: "Why didn't we stop climate change when we still had the chance?" He looks back on footage of real people around the world in the years leading up to 2015 before runaway climate change took place. Written by Adela Pickles

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Why didn't we save ourselves when we had the chance?


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Release Date:

20 August 2009 (New Zealand)  »

Also Known As:

A Era da Estupidez  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

£650,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£101,752 (UK) (20 March 2009)
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film takes place in 2055. See more »

Goofs

At the end of a timeline depicting the disasters Earth has to endure thanks to man's effect on global warming, an image of Earth is shown. Despite all talk of melting ice caps and rising sea levels, Earth's land mass looks exactly as it does when the film was made. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Archivist of the future: Welcome to the global Ark-ive, a vast storage structure located 800 km north of Norway. It contains the artwork from every national museum. There are pickled animals, stacked up, two by two; every film, every book, every scientific report, all stored on banks of servers. But the conditions we're experiencing now were actually caused by our behavior in the period leading up to 2015. In other words: we could have saved ourselves. We could have saved ourselves, but we didn't.
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Connections

Featured in Pauw & Witteman: Episode #4.11 (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

A Life in Ashes
Written by Lee Tibbetts, Andy Hutton & Paul Fowler
Performed by Dragnerve
Under License from Dragnerve
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User Reviews

 
Not perfect, but a must-see for all
5 April 2009 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

The Age of Stupid is a film about climate change, but it's not An Inconvenient Truth: Part Deux. Whereas the purpose of Al Gore's 2006 box office hit was to shake us from our slumber of self-comforting denial, Stupid is designed to take hold of our heads and smash our faces repeatedly into a table until we get up and do things differently.

It's indicative of how the debate has shifted over the last few years that Stupid does not spend time linking climate change with greenhouse gas emissions. The film states that less than 1% of climate scientists believe that there is any doubt about that link (even if this number rises to 60% when the general public are asked their opinion). The debate is over at long last, so the intention of Stupid is to use human stories to illustrate what a serious pickle our species has got itself into.

Stupid is mostly a documentary following the very different lives of six individuals and families around the world. The subjects include an oil geologist who lived in New Orleans when Hurricane Katrina hit, attempting to deal with the devastation of losing everything he owned to a natural disaster that was probably worsened by the burning of oil that he discovered.

Stupid is immaculately produced, carefully involving the audience in the on screen emotions, from sharing the heartbreak of the elderly French mountain guide witnessing a glacier recede, to the frustrated anger of the environmentalist whose wind farm had been blocked by a local NIMBY campaign.

Linking the documentaries together is a series of animated fact files from Passion Pictures (famous for the Gorrilaz) and an innovative fictional subplot starring Pete Postlethwaite. Postlethwaite plays the role of an archivist in 2055, responsible for curating a climate-proof store of human culture, history and scientific discovery, as well as two pickled specimens of every creature on Earth. At this stage, the planet is all-but uninhabitable and the archivist creates the film as a warning for whichever civilisation finally inherits the Earth.

Stupid focuses on the idea that it was our behaviour in the years up to 2015 that caused unstoppable climate change, culminating in the near- extinction of life by the middle of the century. Postelthwaite's character struggles to comprehend quite why we did nothing to stop our own suicide even when we knew that we could.

So is it a good film? Yes, it's bordering on the brilliant. At times it made me laugh, at other times it filled me with tears, and at one point I literally swung my fist in anger at the Daily Mail worshipping, house price obsessed, anti-wind lobbyists. Stupid isn't perfect; I felt that a couple of the documentary subjects distracted from the main issue of climate change by focusing on the evils of Big Oil. However, I would still challenge anyone who sees this film to leave the cinema without a fire in their belly.

Sadly, The Age of Stupid has not been seen by many people. It is an independent film which was funded entirely by small contributions from public investors. As such, it hasn't had the benefit of large distribution networks and, three weeks after release, is only now available at a few commendable cinemas. I shared the experience with 13 other people at the Panton St Odeon in London. Elsewhere, Horne and Corden's Lesbian Vampire Killers was probably playing to a full house. The Age of Stupid sounds like quite an apt title to me.


58 of 85 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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Propagandistic Trash deuxtemps
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The age of stupid started when they made this film! draborn1
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