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The Degrees of Difference (2006)

Grant Patten guides us through disparate Toronto buildings - some inhabited, others abandoned - in a seemingly impossible pursuit to unite the dissimilar. The documentary addresses issues ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Grant Patten ...
Himself - Narrator
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Himself - Cameraman / Sound Recordist
Thomas Nagy ...
Himself - Cameraman
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Storyline

Grant Patten guides us through disparate Toronto buildings - some inhabited, others abandoned - in a seemingly impossible pursuit to unite the dissimilar. The documentary addresses issues of film making ethics while paying homage to the universal endeavor of attempting to find an organization for things. Written by Grant Patten <grant@grpatten.com>

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Whether one is trying to find a good form of organization for some objects, for a series of images, or for their life... it is always an admirable pursuit.

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Documentary | Short

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9 September 2008 (USA)  »

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CAD 1,000 (estimated)
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(RCA Sound System)

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(NTSC Color)
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A Glidecam stabilization device was used in combination with a wheelchair to accomplish the movie's many smooth tracking shots. See more »

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User Reviews

Photons Explained
11 January 2009 | by (Virginia Beach) – See all my reviews

This, I think is a student film.

Its pretty darn remarkable in some of the things I value. Except for the unlucky selection of a font that is used throughout, its remarkably cinematic. There's a natural fluidity in the edits and superpositions. And its based on an intriguing enough idea.

I think this very film could be a winner if the narration was completely redone. Instead of showing us, it tells us what it is showing. The narrator may have a fluid vision, but he is a disaster as a narrator. And the idea of explaining a search for texture undermines the idea in the first place.

The model, explained in the beginning, is that if you look properly, a sisterhood of textures is apparent. So we look and it should be apparent. He chooses spaces and spatial textures: colors, planes, objects, scale — all the right things, though I'd include luminosity. I'll bet that this reappears with a different approach to presenting what it is. I'll bet that instead of having that false start at the beginning where they go to a really cool space and say, "nah, not here," they follow the electrical wires from the abandoned power plant to the soon to be abandoned college hallways and find the texture difference in the dead light.

Ted's Evaluation -- 2 of 3: Has some interesting elements.


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