"Desperate Housewives: Look Into Their Eyes and You See What They Know (#5.19)"
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"Desperate Housewives" - "Look Into Their Eyes and You See What They Know" - April 19, 2009

We hear Edie in voice-over talking about when we last saw her, crashing into a utility pole and then getting electrocuted. We see all the neighbors run out and survey the crash scene. Everyone freaks. Mike goes to the body and Lee calls the cops. Susan whispers into her ear "Don't worry Edie, you're going to get through this." Edie points out this was just another case of Susan being wrong again. Two seconds later, she took her last breath. As she sees it the good news is she died as she lived, the center of attention.

Edie continues the voice over as we see a flash to two days later with Dave asking the housewives -sans Katherine- but with Mrs. McCluskey asking them to take Edie's ashes somewhere. None are thrilled but all are doing it. In the car, with Lynette driving, Susan thinks they should share memories of Edie that put her in a positive light. They all search for them. Bree points out that Susan and Edie were never friends, clashing from the moment they met. Susan says it didn't seem it would be that way from their first meeting.

We flash back to that day, which started off with Susan taking out the trash and then changing her mind about a donut from on top. Edie jogs up and is grossed out and tries to give Susan her money for food, thinking Susan is homeless. Edie had just moved in. Susan invited her in for coffee and gossip.

We cut to them jogging together later. Susan wimps out so they decide to chat instead as some neighbors pass by. Edie admits she's sleeping with the husband. Susan judges her harshly and stalks off. We cut to Edie coming to Susan's house to tell her that she saw Karl with another woman. Susan thinks that Edie is trying to get back at her for passing judgment. She says the woman was Karl's secretary and it was harmless. Edie scoffs. Susan again brings up Edie's fling with the neighbor. Edie says it's different since, unlike Karl's secretary, she's not trying to break up anyone's marriage, just trying to have some fun and help a guy through his midlife crisis. Susan goes to walk away and Edie points out that Susan is wasting her time judging Edie instead of focusing on the problem in her own marriage. Edie says she's trying to help her neighbor, she thought it was the moral thing to do. We cut back to the car and Susan saying three weeks later she discovered the truth about Karl and his secretary.

Gaby says they can say what they want about Edie but she knew men. Mrs. McCluskey says she should hope so after all those years of research. Susan is now regretting all the times they sniped at each other when they could've been friends. Lynette says if Edie knew what Susan was about to do for her she'd forgive her.

Lynette takes the urn from Gaby and looks inside and says it looks like cat litter. She tells her Edie tale next. She asks if they remember taking turns driving her to chemo. She says none of them did it like Edie.

We flash back to Edie entering Lynette's house during the time of her cancer treatment. She'd brought over a DVD. Catherine brings in some nasty-sounding "health" food and Lynette has her waiting on her hand and foot. Disgusted Edie drags Lynette to a biker bar. Lynette is freaked out but Edie is trying to force her to have some fun. She orders up some tequila shooters and chats with bikers. She tries to get Lynette to play pool with one but Lynette keeps pointing out the cancer. The biker dislodges his prosthetic arm and says he'll play her one-handed. Lynette again points out the cancer. Edie 's all cancer-schmancer, she says she knows it's hard but she wants Lynette to start fighting by really living and remembering who she is, the strongest woman Edie knows. Lynette is touched and downs the tequila and heads off to "shoot some stick." Back in the car in the present they all laugh. Then they get a flat.

As McCluskey changes the flat Bree points out that this area is where Edie lived for the time she was off Wisteria Lane. The ladies wonder how she knows that. Bree said she ran into her in a place she never thought she'd be. We cut to Bree visiting Orson in jail. Bree is less than psyched at the squalid conditions of the visitor's room. The guard is unimpressed. Edie decides to leave and the guard says that's fine since he has another visitor scheduled anyway, he won't even need to know she was there. Turns out Edie has been visiting him every week.

Bree goes to visit Edie, she wonders what Edie's up to. Edie says she's not up to anything, he's close by and she feels sorry for him since she knows what it's like to be exiled from suburbia. After discerning Edie isn't trying to start something with Orson, she thanks her and tries to leave. Edie asks why Bree isn't visiting him. Bree says she's busy with the catering company and Benjamin. Edie pooh-poohs this and asks the real reason. Bree says the jail is disgusting and she can't do it. Edie points out that Orson went to jail for her and that means he really loves her so she wonders why she can't suck it up and visit him once a month and help him through his nightmare. Edie than tells her not to visit since Orson can do so much better than Bree.

We cut to Bree going back to see Orson. She asks how he is. He is sullen. She tries to sympathize. He won't let her. She says he has every right to hate her. He says she needn't be melodramatic. She says she hates herself for asking him to come here, especially now that she's seen it. She says she doesn't know what she was thinking. He points out that she was thinking he should take responsibility for his actions. She apologizes for never coming to visit and wonders how he'll ever forgive her. He asks her to be there when he gets out. Cut back to the present and Bree saying she never told them that because she was embarrassed. Being shamed into being a better person by Edie is embarrassing points out Gaby. The flat is fixed and they're off again.

Back in the car they joke about Edie's vanity and it's Gaby's turn. We flash back to a night Gaby and Edie spent preparing to go to a club right after Gaby and Carlos divorced. They both look hot and think they're an unstoppable team. They discuss the various merits of the other women on the street.

They hit the club and it's pumping. Gaby gets a drink delivered right as they enter. Edie is disappointed. They start sniping at one another like pretty girls do: you're tiny, you're boobs are fake, yada, yada, yada. They decide to figure out who is hotter by seeing how many drinks they can have bought for them in an hour. They split up and flirt. We get a montage of drink giving and swizzle stick stashing. They meet back up. Gaby got more. Edie is annoyed. Gaby goes to hit on more dudes.

We cut to Gaby getting out of a cab and going over to Edie on swing set wanting to know why Edie ditched her at the bar. Edie says she needed to be alone. Gaby hopes she isn't depressed over their stupid game. Edie says she's not depressed, she's surprised. Staring at the sky Edie says she can't believe how quickly her youth has gone by and the harder she tries to hold on to it- make-up, dim lighting etc- the quicker it goes. Gaby scoffs and calls Edie gorgeous and will be forever. Edie laughs and says that's the tricky part, she says ever since she was a child she knew she wasn't going to see 50. Edie calls it a gift, she appreciates her life in a way most people don't, she just didn't expect it to go by this fast. Gaby tries to convince her she's wrong and that 50 years from now they'll still be clubbing in inappropriate clothes and milking geezers for drinks. They head off for a nightcap.

Back in the car Lynette and Susan are annoyed at the part of the story that made them sound like the less hot housewives. Bree announces they've reached their destination as they pull up to a stately manor which is a building at Beecher Academy. The ladies wonder if they're ready to tell Travers that his mother is dead.

They enter his dorm room en masse. He wonders where Edie is. Bree comes in with a basket of muffins. He wonders what's up, if Edie is in trouble. They sit him down and Lynette breaks the news. They hadn't been able to contact his dad since he was out of the country and Dave didn't know him so he thought it best they break the news. They ask if he needs a minute and he declines saying he's okay and that he's late for class. He's obviously troubled but says he's sorry she's dead but they weren't very close. Bree says she's still your mother. Not a very good one, says Travers. Susan tries to speak up on Edie's behalf. Travers says Edie essentially passed him off to his dad and he's not sure how he's supposed to forgive that. He goes to leave and McCluskey practically clotheslines him saying he needs to know something about Edie.

McCluskey's flashback is on a day when she says she'd only known Edie for about a year. McCluskey is sitting on the couch drinking when Edie enters. She wonders what's up. McCluskey says it's the anniversary of her son's death, which never gets easier. McCluskey says she's lucky not to have any kids. Edie says she has a son, who lives with his father. Edie says they both have lost kids. McCluskey corrects that her son died, Edie gave hers away and she shouldn't be comparing the two. Edie says she gave him up because she wanted to protect him from her. She says if he was going to grow up normal he needed to get away from her. McCluskey calls that a cop-out and Edie selfish. Edie says there's nothing McCluskey could say that could make her think less of her self than she already does but if it gives him a chance, so be it. McCluskey wonders if Edie wonders if Travers is going to hate her. Edie says she loves him enough to let him hate her. McCluskey pours Edie a drink and says she hopes she's not making a big mistake. Me too, says Edie.

Cut back to the present and McCluskey telling Travers that she's not defending what Edie did but that he has to know that she loved him more than he can imagine, and he needs to know it. He skedaddles to class. They go to leave and Travers catches up with them to thank them for coming all the way out to tell him. Gaby tries to give him the urn. He tells them to take it saying they were her best friends and that they can think of a perfect place to put her.

The ladies return home, all asleep in the car. Lynette wakes them with a honk. McCluskey says they still have to figure out where to scatter the ashes. They decided to reconvene in the morning and McCluskey takes the urn home and has a drink with Edie. She asks what they're going to do with her and a wind blows her front door open. As she goes to close it she surveys the neighborhood and says to the urn "subtle as always I see." The next day they separate the ashes into smaller containers. They decide to all say one word that summed up the way they thought of her. Gaby: Sexy. Bree: Perceptive. Lynette: Strong. McCluskey: Beautiful. Susan: One of a kind. (She needed four words).

They each take their containers and Edie's voice over returns narrating that each woman poured a little on different parts of their own properties that meant something to Edie. She says the wind came and picked her up and as she floated away she let go of suburbia: white picket fences, coffee cups and vacuum cleaners, cars and driveways, the stuff of life that was one of a kind. She says it's not hard to die when you know that you have lived: "And I did, oh how I lived."


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