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The Tourist (2010) Poster

(2010)

Trivia

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Sam Worthington replaced Tom Cruise, who was originally going to play Frank Tupelo. Johnny Depp then replaced Worthington, when the latter withdrew from the film over "creative differences."
Angelina Jolie admitted, in an interview with Vogue Magazine, that the only reason she agreed to do this movie, was because she knew it would be a "quick shoot" in Venice, Italy.
Charlize Theron was originally going to play Elise Clifton-Ward (Angelina Jolie).
On the strength of his previous movie, The Lives of Others (2006), director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck was granted a large amount of control in casting decisions and the screenplay for his big-budget Hollywood debut. However, when shooting began, his famous lead actors took control, and in the end, he had very little creative input.
The Palazzo Pisani-Moretta was used as a stand-in for the real Hotel Danieli.
The project went through several directorial changes. Originally, the film was set with Lasse Hallström, but he left over scheduling conflicts. Then Bharat Nalluri came on, but left after the project had more difficulties. Then, when Angelina Jolie came on, so did Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, but he left over "creative differences," along with Sam Worthington. But after many names were mooted, including Alfonso Cuarón, Donnersmarck returned.
This espionage-comedy has several elements in common with the James Bond franchise. The villain is played by Steven Berkoff, who played a villain in Octopussy (1983), while the section chief is played by Timothy Dalton, the former James Bond from The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989). The movie is predominantly set in Venice, which is where three Bond pictures have been filmed: From Russia with Love (1963), Casino Royale (2006), and Moonraker (1979). Of the latter, both this film and that feature the Hotel Danieli.
Lord Julian Fellowes has said in interviews, that little of his work on the screenplay, ended up on-screen.
Angelina Jolie dons twelve outfits throughout the movie.
Alexander Pearce is also the name of a notorious Tasmanian cannibal. Between 1823 and 1824, he murdered and ate five men.
First collaboration of Johnny Depp and Paul Bettany. The pair also appeared in Mortdecai (2015) and Transcendence (2014).
The HFPA received ridicule when they nominated it for a Golden Globe in the Best Film (Musical or Comedy) category, since it was not marketed as a comedy. The director, however, stated he felt the film was more comedy, than drama. Angelina Jolie and Johnny Depp were also nominated for Best Lead Actor and Best Lead Actress respectively.
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The filming schedule was tight, as Johnny Depp had to leave the production on a certain date, as he was due to start filming Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011).
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Angelina Jolie had been attracted to the project by the potential of the strong female character, and by the chance to work with Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, and to have him co-write the script. After a very early meeting, it was clear that the director and star were on the same page about the kind of movie they wanted to make. Jolie said: "The Lives of Others (2006) is a beautiful, intelligent film, but also heavy. When we met, he was very clear that he wanted to make a movie that was luxurious and fun, something that would be exciting for people to watch, but didn't take itself too seriously. It was a perfect match."
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A policeman was on-duty the whole time the boat chase sequence was being filmed in Venice, to ensure that no one went over the rigidly enforced speed limits.
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When he returned to the project, Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck re-wrote the script in two weeks, and shot the film in just fifty-eight days.
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The Doge Suite in the film is located inside the Danieli Hotel in Venice, Italy and the crew did actually film in the lobby of the Danieli Hotel, though a suite was constructed off the hotel premises. The actual location of the Doge Suite set was at the Palazzo Pisani Moretta, right on the Grand Canal, so it had the perfect balcony where an intimate scene between Elise Clifton-Ward (Angelina Jolie) and Frank Tupelo (Johnny Depp) could be shot. Venice is a city built in brick, and the Doge Suite's interior earthy terracotta hues meshed with ornate accents like crystal chandeliers enhance the location space of Palazzo Pisani Moretta. Production Designer Jon Hutman re-proportioned the rooms and with double doors and floor to ceiling windows the space transformed into timeless combination of modern and old Venetian décor. Angelina Jolie said: "When we were shooting inside the Doge Suite set, I spent the three days of shooting there thinking, 'What an amazing hotel room'. Then someone showed me that none of the walls were real, and that's not real marble, it's painted. It was crafted so meticulously I couldn't tell what was added on and what was adjusted."
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Venice, Italy is primarily a tourist destination, and the Mayor's Office and the Chief of Police in Venice were very helpful during filming, in assisting the production blend in with some of the twenty million visitors the city receives every year with a minimum of headaches. From Piazza San Marco, to the Peggy Guggenheim, to the Natural History Museum, to the Rialto Market, to the Arsenale, tourists visiting the city caught a glimpse of movie stars Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie in action.
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The film's Venice geography is largely fictitious. There is a real Hotel Danieli in Venice, located next to the Piazza San Marco with a large pedestrian area in front. The Hotel Danieli seen in the film is located in the Grand Canal close to the Ponte Rialto and is only approachable by boat. Its lower floors were filmed at the Palazzo Pisani Moretta with computer/studio extensions added for its top floors. When Johnny Depp escapes from the hotel, he runs across rooftops towards the Rialto Bridge, which is seen from south-west, but then jumps from a building and lands in the Rialto Market far north of the bridge on the opposite side of the canal.
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When Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck presented his vision of The Tourist (2010) to Graham King, it took King all of thirty minutes to decide that he wanted to finance and produce the film. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck said: "I wanted to make a film that would be one of those experiences where you just sit back and enjoy life for a couple of hours." King said: "When Florian sent me the script, there was a combination of factors that made me want to sign on. In the past several years, he had seen a lot of scripts, and passed on a lot of scripts - he had his choice of projects - so I was intrigued that he had taken to this one. Having Angelina Jolie attached didn't hurt, either."
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Johnny Depp said that he liked working with Graham King. Depp said this was because "Graham is a renegade. He understands the rules of the game, but he doesn't necessarily adhere to them. He thrives on the risk factor, and that makes him unique. He likes a challenge, he's got great taste, and he doesn't care what other people are doing. He cares about what he believes in."
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Production Designer Jon Hutman said of filming in Venice, Italy: "There is something about being there.The water, the architecture, and the history combined create something very special. What we have tried to do is take these existing visual gems and fit them into the story." Not only was it the right creative choice to shoot the movie in Venice, but surprisingly enough, the choice made practical sense as well. "It seems like a crazy thing for a studio or producer to allow, but we had a very limited window in which to make the movie. We didn't have time to build the Venice interiors on a soundstage. For entirely practical reasons, we had to do the unheard-of thing."
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"Every day, we tried to add more detail and texture. One night, shortly before we shot the sequence, I came home from work in the early morning hours and saw this beautiful fog, all over Venice," said Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. "I thought, 'Oh, it would be really nice to have that in the film.' So we went pretty heavy on the fog to try to recreate that beauty. It was really a good way to use the dark side of the city, the danger that comes with the romance."
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"Shooting in Venice gave this film a very special, joyful, and very beautiful flavor," said Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. "Of course, it also presented us with considerable design challenges, since Venice and Paris have been photographed so much, and we wanted to show it in a new way. (Production Designer) Jon Hutman was the first person I called after I read the script. I had admired his work on (Robert) Redford's film Quiz Show (1994), on Nancy Meyers' What Women Want (2000) and Something's Gotta Give (2003) and on and on Sydney Pollack's The Interpreter (2005) and knew that he would be able to get me what I needed."
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The names of the two famous people, amongst others, who had stayed in the Doge's Suite at the luxurious Venetian hotel, were Marcel Proust and Honoré de Balzac.
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Among the more than fifty locations in the film, Jon Hutman's team was tasked with huge builds on three sets: the Doge Suite in the Danieli Hotel; the Gala, a black-tie affair; and Alexander Pearce's apartment, where the climax of the film takes place.
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For the Gala set, Jon Hutman and his team took ten weeks to design a concept for an empty space the size of a football field. Hutman and Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, along with Location Manager Fabrizio Cerato, found the Scuola Grande della Misericordia in the Canneregio district in Venice, Italy, and fell in love with it from the moment they saw it. This vast interior of this eighteenth century building has exposed brick walls, typical in Venetian architecture, along with columns for building support. Hutman and his Supervising Art Director, Marco Trentini, and a team of twenty expert builders and painters, took four weeks after the designs were completed to bring the set to life. Because the building is historically preserved, The City of Venice had to approve every aspect of Hutman's design, right down to the nail. An entire mezzanine and balcony were built from scratch; sculpted and sanded to match the existing columns and floors. This was complete with a railed staircases. A dance floor was built from wood, and the wood was hand-painted to look like marble. A raised platform was constructed for the twenty-piece orchestra featured in the scene. The columns were wrapped with mirrors and squared wooden frames that were painted to blend in with the real white marble. Electrical outlets were installed for the crystal sconce accessories that radiated in the space. "As Elise and Frank dance, you have this glittering, sparkling background. Glamour. A formal but kind of raw elegance," said Hutman.
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At one point, Paul Bettany mentions a bank account in Liechtenstein. In the movie A Knight's Tale (2001), in which Bettany also stars, Heath Ledger's character goes by the name Ulrich Von Liechtenstein.
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Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie were two of the most engaging, charismatic, and talented actors working in film at the time, according to the movie's production notes. But as the film requires its characters to share an immediate attraction to each other, all felt it was a good idea to meet and talk before signing on, and believe it or not, that is how Angelina Jolie and Johnny Depp met for the first time. Despite being two of the biggest movie stars, they had not entered each other's orbit until they sat down to discuss The Tourist (2010) with the producer and director. Producer Graham King sat quietly and watched them interact, watching to see how the actors would get along. Perhaps it was no surprise that they clicked from the first moment. King said: "There was complete instant chemistry between them both." Producer Tim Headington of GK Films added: "Graham called me right after that meeting and was so excited. Later, when we started filming and seeing dailies, it was just like magic on tape." For Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, they were the perfect leads for this film. He said: "They're great movie stars, but more than that, they are great actors, and I wanted to give them roles in which they could really show what they can do. Elise is charming and delicate and feminine and strong, all at the same time; Frank is winning and charming and funny, just like Johnny is in real life." Co-Screenwriter Julian Fellowes said: "Having either Angelina Jolie or Johnny Depp in this film would have been extraordinary, but the pair together is that perfect combination you dream about but rarely, if ever, happens."
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Both lead actors saw their marriages fall apart in 2016. Angelina Jolie surprised everybody for initiating divorce proceedings from Brad Pitt, following altercations over the rearing of their children, while Johnny Depp's marriage to Amber Heard came to an acrimonious end in the full glare of the tabloids.
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The most important step for the director and producer was to find the right leading man for actress Angelina Jolie, who was already attached when Johnny Depp came on board. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck said: "We really needed someone who wouldn't be eclipsed by Angelina. When we brainstormed over what actor could be a true partner for her in terms of attractiveness, intelligence, and acting skill, the only name that kept coming to our minds was Johnny Depp."
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Johnny Depp and Graham King have been friends for years, and at the time of production, had recently teamed up on several projects. After wrapping one such collaboration and with an eye toward working together again, King mentioned to Depp that Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck and he were looking for a leading man to star in a fun, exciting, sexy thriller opposite Angelina Jolie, and both felt that he would be perfect for the part. So Depp and Donnersmarck had a meeting and talked about The Tourist (2010). Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck said: "I presented the kind of character I envisioned for him, and he liked it. Our meeting lasted three hours instead of one, and we laughed so much, that I realized I needed to introduce a lot of humor into the script to do justice to Johnny's charm."
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The setting called for the film's action sequences to be striking, and written especially for the city. Stunt Choreographer Simon Crane was charged with planning character-driven action sequences unique to Venice. Crane said: "Anyone can dream up an action sequence. But if it doesn't fit the tone of the film, it's totally worthless. It's all about believability."
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Simon Crane has worked with Angelina Jolie on several films, including such other espionage related pictures as Salt (2010) and Mr. & Mrs. Smith (2005), and said the actress on The Tourist (2010), as always, was committed to getting the action right.
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Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck wrote his thesis at film school on The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999). In that, he wrote extensively about the contribution made to the film by its Australian Cinematographer, John Seale. He was naturally thrilled when Seale agreed to be the Director of Photography of this film.
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Spyglass Entertainment developed the property before GK Films stepped in to finance and produce the picture.
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Graham King said of this film: "I wanted this to be a thriller that was simply a fun time at the movies. Two extraordinary actors, with amazing chemistry, set in an exotic, bigger-than-life location. Who wouldn't want to go on an adventure in Paris and Venice with Angelina and Johnny?"
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The screenwriters set the film in Venice, which Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck said, lent the film its entirely unique atmosphere of beauty and danger. Florian added: "Somebody once said that Kodak owed most of its revenue to Venice. In terms of art and beauty, it's the richest place in the world - there's nothing else like it. In reality, the city is sinking and falling to bits, but we wanted to show the glory of the place. We asked ourselves, how can we show the city from its best side? There are elements of the plot that are dangerous - but, thanks to Venice, not so dangerous that you might feel miserable about it."
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This movie was released five years after Anthony Zimmer (2005), the source French movie, on which this movie was based.
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Two cast members - Vladimir Orlov and Vladimir Tevlovski - were both first named Vladimir. The pair played the characters of Lebyadkin and Liputin respectively, characters whose first names both began with the letter "L". Both Vlads were also stunt-men working on the picture in stunts as part of the stunt department.
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In early conversations between Jon Hutman and Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, they agreed the film's design had to reflect the beauty of the city of Venice, while making sure the city still felt fresh and contemporary. Hutman explained: "Where else, but the city of Venice, can you have canal boat chases and roof top chases, but also have your characters doing a walk-and-talk strolling through some of the most stunning streets in the world? Angelina Jolie, Johnny Depp, and Venice . . . It doesn't get much better than that!".
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It was Julian Fellowes who hatched the idea of setting the film in Venice. He said: "Venice combines beguiling beauty with a sinister under-taste of a decay of civilization. The city can have a darkness to it."
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The production notes for the film declare that the Italian water-set city of Venice is "city of canals" and stretches across a shallow and marshy lagoon along the Adriatic Sea in Northeast Italy. Venice was built on an archipelago of one hundred eighteen islands formed by about one hundred fifty canals, with roughly four hundred bridges connecting the islands. Transportation is either by boat or on foot. No cars, or even bicycles are allowed.
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Even with the logistical challenges the city of Venice presented, it was easy to sell the filmmakers on the location. Executive Producer Lloyd Phillips explained: "You really never know what Venice is about. It has so many faces. The architecture is so unique. The light is like nowhere else in the world. It bounces off the canals onto windows in such a magical way. This film is filled with twists and turns, and that intrigue, along with the combination of the character of the city, is a perfect marriage."
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This movie reunited Paul Bettany and Rufus Sewell after they had appeared in A Knight's Tale (2001).
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This movie's opening title card states: "Paris, France".
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The name of the spy novel that Frank Tupelo (Johnny Depp) was reading, was the fictitious book "The Berlin Vendetta" by fictitious novelist Charles Torbett. Coincidentally though, working in the film industry, there really is a Charles Torbett, who is an Art Department Property Master.
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Bharat Nalluri replaced Lasse Hallström as director, as the latter left the project due to scheduling conflicts. Then, Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck replaced Bharat Nalluri as director, due to other difficulties associated with making the picture. However, Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck at one stage, left the production, but later returned to continue helming the picture.
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Intelligence Agencies referenced and/or featured in this feature film include Interpol.
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This film's closing credits declare that this movie was: "Filmed on location in Venice" and "Filmed on location in Paris, France".
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The extras feature titled "Action In Venice" commentary states that actors and crew who had to enter the Venetian water were put on antibiotics for weeks beforehand, as the water was deemed so polluted.
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Cameo 

Anoushka Ravanshad: Uncredited, as a woman at the café.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Alexander Pearce's note tells Elise Clifton-Ward (Angelina Jolie) to take the 8:22 train to Venice. On the train, Frank Tupelo (Johnny Depp) is sitting in the eighth seat of the twenty second car.
Timothy Dalton, the former James Bond, partakes in a scene in this spy movie which is the opposite to which he played in the earlier Bond movie Licence to Kill (1989). In this film, as a section head, he terminates the employment of spy Angelina Jolie. In Licence to Kill (1989), as Bond, he had his license to kill revoked by M at Ernest Hemingway's house in Key West.
Johnny Depp performed dual roles in this film, starring as Frank Tupelo and Alexander Pearce.
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A scene in which Frank Tupelo (Johnny Depp), attempting to escape would-be murderers who are convinced he is Alexander Pearce, leaps across Venice rooftops, just as Casanova did as he attempted to escape jealous husbands. "It came to me when reading about Casanova. Of course, Frank is the anti-Casanova," said Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. "I thought, wouldn't that be a fun way to present him, not as a great, confident lover trying to escape the cuckolded husband, but running for his life from gangsters. It reinforces the character and also presents all the beauty of Venice. It was a lot of fun."
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An action sequence that made full use of everything Venice, Italy had to offer, was the canal boat chase. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck captured the action with multiple cameras over seven nights. Jolie even learned to drive several kinds of boats for the sequence. Creating such a stylized stunt sequence, and at night no less, was a challenge, not least because the team was prevented from rehearsing in the actual location. However, it was a challenge perfectly suited to Simon Crane who said: "We rehearsed everything on open water, with buoys and other markers. It was a challenge, but you just have to do it."
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The identification number of intelligence operative Elise Clifton-Ward (Angelina Jolie) was MF598495G.
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Two actors portrayed Alexander Pearce. They were Rufus Sewell and Johnny Depp.
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The secret place which contained the safe was behind the terracotta ornamental face of the pictorial plaque featuring the Roman God Janus.
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