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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 41 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


The Top 12 Composers of the 21st Century, From Hans Zimmer to Nick Cave

7 August 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In an age where special effects reign supreme, there’s one aspect of the filmmaking process that hasn’t gone through a radical transformation — music. Some of the best movies in any given year would be sorely lacking without their memorable scores, and this has remained true well into the first two decades of the 21st century.

Read More‘Logan’ Composer Marco Beltrami on R-Rated Wolverine Minimalist Score

Film composers play an integral part in the filmmaking process, and there are a handful whose bodies of work stand out in recent years. Of course, this list of 12 major composers only begins to scratch the surface of the talent out there. There are plenty of other worthy contributors to the medium who didn’t make the cut — Danny Elfman and John Williams, we’re looking at you — but rest assured that this top dozen represent the cream of the crop.

Hans Zimmer »

- Gabrielle Kiss

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‘It’: Tilda Swinton Was Considered to Play Pennywise the Clown, but the Evil Force That Is Her Schedule Wouldn’t Allow It

27 July 2017 2:18 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Here’s a bit of dream casting that literally ended up being too good to be true: Tilda Swinton as Pennywise the Clown in “It.” Nerdist has the news that the chameleonic Oscar winner, seen recently (and controversially) in “Doctor Strange” and well known for her roles in such films as “Michael Clayton” and “We Need to Talk About Kevin,” was considered for the terrifying part — but “she wasn’t available.”

Read More‘It’ New Trailer: Pennywise the Clown is Here to Give You Very Disturbing Nightmares

That’s according to producer Barbara Muschietti, who fielded questions about this new adaptation of Stephen King’s classic horror novel alongside her brother Andrés (who directed it). One reporter asked whether Swinton was approached, apparently as a joke; to everyone’s surprise, Barbara answered in the affirmative.

“No, no I swear to God,” she went on, explaining that the cinematic siblings did »

- Michael Nordine

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Foreplays #2: Lynne Ramsay's "Gasman"

30 June 2017 6:57 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Foreplays is a column that explores under-known short films by renowned directors. Lynn Ramsay's Gasman (1998) is free to watch below.Lynne Ramsay’s Gasman is a film about family, and a film made with family—the director’s own brother and niece play, respectively, the central father and daughter in the story. Two siblings, Lynne (Lynne Ramsay Jr.) and Steve (Martin Anderson), go to a Christmas party with their father (James Ramsay), while the mother (Denise Flannagan) remains at home. They briefly meet with a woman (Jackie Quinn) and her two kids (Lisa Taylor, Robert McEwan). The woman leaves, but her children join the party. Gasman is the story both of a perfectly banal evening, and of an exceptional event that serves to fracture the family unit, messing up all its usual roles, and dissolving the very idea of what is familiar. Ramsay achieves this by never losing sight either of the everyday, »

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‘And Then I Go’ Review: We Need to Talk About This Disturbing Coming-of-Age Drama

23 June 2017 6:22 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

You may not have liked going to school as a kid, but you probably didn’t hate it as much as Edwin. In his opening narration, the eighth-grader, played by an impressive Arman Darbo, refers to his school as the reason he can’t sleep at night, a clique-filled nightmare and a “big shit-pile floating downstream.” At the bottom of that stream, caught in the wake and crashing against the rocks, he and his best friend are trying — and failing — to make it through each day undisturbed.

Read More: Laff 2017: 10 Festival Picks, from ‘My Friend Dahmer’ to ‘Everything Beautiful Is Far Away’

A coming-of-age drama about kids who may never actually come of age, “And Then I Go” reads as a less abrasive “We Need to Talk About Kevin.” Vincent Grashaw’s adaptation of Jim Shepard’s 2004 novel “Project X” isn’t about red flags and warning signs so much as the toxic combination of angst, detachment and alienation that makes terrible decisions seem like the only recourse to kids who don’t know — or don’t believe — that the problems they’re facing will one day seem insignificant. 

“Kids like you used to get their butts kicked when I was a kid,” Edwin’s kind-but-exhausted principal (Tony Hale, living up to the tradition of comic TV actors going serious for the indies) tells him after one especially sarcastic visit to the office. “They still do,” responds the troubled youth, who’s as quick-witted as he is confused. Cut to: Edwin and his best friend Flake getting their asses kicked by a couple of soccer players.

It takes all of 15 minutes to glean that this film’s narrative trajectory probably isn’t leaning toward reconciliation and catharsis. Edwin doesn’t seem likely to emerge from his adolescent ordeals changed for the better, and his parents (Melanie Lynskey and Justin Long) aren’t going to have an aha moment where they realize how to connect with their son. No, this movie’s arc is signaled by a question Flake asks Edwin: “Wanna see my dad’s guns?”

Rather than try to remake Gus Van Sant’s “Elephant,” as Tim Sutton did in “Dark Night,” Grashaw has crafted an intimate, sympathetic character study. The focus is on Edwin rather than what he may or may not eventually do, which is largely at the behest of his angry bestie. They’re making a list and checking it twice, but it’s clear all along that Flake (real name Roddy) is more committed to the idea than our wayward protagonist. Will they or won’t they?

Read More: As the Los Angeles Film Festival Struggles for Relevancy, a New Director Has Big Ideas For Change

Grashaw keeps us guessing. “And Then I Go” isn’t elegiac or fatalistic, nor is it a dread-filled slog toward an inevitable conclusion. There are glimmers of hope along the way, and a group art project goes surprisingly well — Edwin’s parents suggest taking a trip to the lake they used to visit every summer — and suggestions that the boy will find a way to weather this storm. By the time the end arrives, we’re as surprised as Edwin and Flake want their classmates to be.

Grade: B

And Then I Go” premiered at the Los Angeles Film Festival. It is currently seeking distribution.

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- Michael Nordine

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Cannes Winning Best Actor and Lanthimos' Quirky 'Family' Thriller Academy Award Chances?

20 June 2017 7:38 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'120 Beats per Minute' trailer: Robin Campillo's AIDS movie features plenty of drama and a clear sociopolitical message. AIDS drama makes Pedro Almodóvar cry – but will Academy members tear up? (See previous post re: Cannes-Oscar connection.) In case France submits it to the 2018 Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, screenwriter-director Robin Campillo's AIDS drama 120 Beats per Minute / 120 battements par minute, about the Paris Act Up chapter in the early 1990s, could quite possibly land a nomination. The Grand Prix (Cannes' second prize), international film critics' Fipresci prize, and Queer Palm winner offers a couple of key ingredients that, despite its gay sex scenes, should please a not insignificant segment of the Academy membership: emotionalism and a clear sociopolitical message. When discussing the film after the presentation of the Palme d'Or, Pedro Almodóvar (and, reportedly, jury member Jessica Chastain) broke into tears. Some believed, in fact, that 120 Beats per Minute »

- Steph Mont.

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Thom Yorke Is ‘Absolutely Terrified’ To Be Composing His First Original Score For ‘Suspiria’

8 June 2017 2:28 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Whether you think remaking Dario Argento’s Italian horror classic “Suspiria” is good idea or not, there’s no denying just how enticing the new version looks on paper. Not only is Luca Guadagnino behind the camera, and not only does the ensemble cast include his “A Bigger Splash” stars Tilda Swinton and Dakota Johnson, but the movie has also recruited Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke to compose his first original movie score.

Read More: ‘Suspiria’: Radiohead’s Thom Yorke to Score Luca Guadagnino’s Horror Remake

Thew news of Yorke’s involvement broke last month, and it was especially exciting given how much success his bandmate Johnny Greenwood has had when it comes to movie scores. Greenwood has been behind the original scores for “There Will Be Blood,” “The Master,” “We Need to Talk About Kevin” and more, and there’s no reason Yorke shouldn’t be able to »

- Zack Sharf

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Film Club: The best of this year’s Cannes was a nightmarish thriller

2 June 2017 11:30 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Returning to the A.V. Club office after almost two weeks in the trenches of Cannes, film editor A.A. Dowd sits down with staff writer Ignatiy Vishnevetsky to talk about the best (and, as luck would have it, last) film he saw at the world’s most important film festival: You Were Never Really Here, a nightmarish noir thriller directed by Lynne Ramsay (Morvern Callar, We Need To Talk About Kevin) that casts a bulked-up Joaquin Phoenix in the unlikely role of a brutal hired gun.

Watch the full episode of Film Club below:

»

- A.A. Dowd, Ignatiy Vishnevetsky

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‘You Were Never Really Here’ Review: Joaquin Phoenix Triumphs in Lynne Ramsay’s Kidnapping Thriller | Cannes 2017

27 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

A vigilante for hire hunts for a kidnapped girl in Ramsay's long-awaited follow-up to 'We Need to Talk About Kevin'. »

- Gregory Ellwood

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You Were Never Really Here | 2017 Cannes Film Festival Review

26 May 2017 4:15 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Where Have You Been?: Ramsay Returns with Pronouncedly Fractured, Melancholic Adaptation

Returning from a six year hiatus after 2011’s We Need To Talk About Kevin, Scottish auteur Lynne Ramsay delivers a career best with a poetically fractured adaptation of Jonathan Ames’ novel You Were Never Really Here.

Continue reading »

- Nicholas Bell

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‘You Were Never Really Here’: Film Review | Cannes 2017

26 May 2017 4:14 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

There was a nine-year gap between the appearance of Lynne Ramsay’s second feature, Morvern Callar (2002), and her third, We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011). Fans of arguably Scotland’s most distinctive living director have only had to wait a mere six years for her latest, You Were Never Really Here. Surely that’s a hopeful sign she’s speeding up, especially given the well-publicized conflagration over her abandoning Jane Got a Gun a couple of years back just before shooting started because of budget issues.

Was it worth the wait for You Were Never Really Here? That’s not a question that »

- Leslie Felperin

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Cannes Film Review: ‘You Were Never Really Here’

26 May 2017 3:33 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Some filmmakers rust during periods of inactivity; Lynne Ramsay arches and tenses, lying in wait like an attack dog. And attack she does, though not in all the expected ways, in her astonishing fourth feature “You Were Never Really Here,” a stark, sinewy, slashed-to-the-bone hitman thriller far more concerned with the man than the hit. Working from a pulp-fiction source that another director might have fashioned into a “Taken” knockoff, Ramsay instead strips the classically botched job at the story’s core down to its barest, bloodiest necessities, lingering far more lavishly on the unspoken emotions rippling across leading man Joaquin Phoenix’s face, and the internal lacerations of trauma and abuse they cumulatively reveal.

With the minimalism of the material providing the cleanest of canvases for the matchless technique of director and star alike, “You Were Never Really Here” isn’t the genre crossover effort Ramsay’s admirers may have feared, »

- Guy Lodge

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‘You Were Never Really Here’ Review: Joaquin Phoenix Has a Death Wish In Lynne Ramsay’s Meandering Detective Story — Cannes

26 May 2017 12:09 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Joaquin Phoenix stumbles through every scene in Lynne Ramsay’s “You Were Never Really Here” as if he overslept, dashed out of bed, and accidentally rushed into the abandoned set of a film noir, then forgot what he was supposed to do. The results are thrilling and frustrating, often within the constraints of a single scene. It’s an enticing challenge for the writer-director to develop a stylish mood piece out this flimsy material, adapted from a Jonathan Ames novella as a series of textured moments. The movie is an elegant homage to a mold of scrappy detective stories that often collapses into a concise pileup of stylish possibilities.

That’s nothing new for the British director, whose 2002 feature “Morvern Callar” showed a penchant for grim genre exercises that treasured mood over plot and mysteries over solutions; her 2011 thriller “We Need to Talk About Kevin” suggested the prospects for expanding »

- Eric Kohn

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‘You Were Never Really Here’ First Clip: Joaquin Phoenix Fights for Justice in Lynne Ramsay’s Cannes Contender

18 May 2017 12:09 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Lynne Ramsay’s sex trafficking thriller “You Were Never Really Here” is one of the 19 films competing for the Palme d’Or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. The Film Stage has the first clip from the movie, which stars Joaquin Phoenix in the lead role. Check out the clip below.

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

Written and helmed by Ramsay, “You Were Never Really Here” is based on the 2013 novella of the same name by Jonathan Ames, creator of the HBO show “Bored to Death.” The film follows a war veteran named Joe (Phoenix) who works rescuing women from sex traffickers. Things go very wrong when he tries to save a girl from a brothel in New York City.

Read More: Cannes 2017: Here Are the Cameras Used To Shoot 29 of This Year’s Films

The film »

- Yoselin Acevedo

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Robert Pattinson Will Rewrite His Career at Cannes, and 7 More Predictions About This Year’s Fest

16 May 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

While the Cannes Film Festival is the showboat film festival to end all festivals, all of that is a springboard for the talking. Talking about the movies, talking about the movie industry, talking about the talking. Last year, the talking points were the persistence of Kristen Stewart, Woody Allen and Ronan Farrow, auteurs like Jim Jarmusch and Nicolas Winding Refn, and women (or the lack thereof). This year, we’ve read the Croisette crystal ball for the conversations likely to dominate the festival in the days to come. This isn’t necessarily about must-see titles (we’ve got those covered here); these are the stories most likely to be heard beyond the Cannes bubble. Here’s a look at the news cycle to come.

Read More: The Potential Oscar Contenders at Cannes 2017: A Rundown

Nicole Kidman Takes Charge

If last year’s Cannes It Girl was brainy “Personal Shopper »

- Anne Thompson and Eric Kohn

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Robert Pattinson Will Rewrite His Career at Cannes, and 7 More Predictions About This Year’s Fest

16 May 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

While the Cannes Film Festival is the showboat film festival to end all festivals, all of that is a springboard for the talking. Talking about the movies, talking about the movie industry, talking about the talking. Last year, the talking points were the persistence of Kristen Stewart, Woody Allen and Ronan Farrow, auteurs like Jim Jarmusch and Nicolas Winding Refn, and women (or the lack thereof). This year, we’ve read the Croisette crystal ball for the conversations likely to dominate the festival in the days to come. This isn’t necessarily about must-see titles (we’ve got those covered here); these are the stories most likely to be heard beyond the Cannes bubble. Here’s a look at the news cycle to come.

Read More: The Potential Oscar Contenders at Cannes 2017: A Rundown

Nicole Kidman Takes Charge

If last year’s Cannes It Girl was brainy “Personal Shopper »

- Anne Thompson and Eric Kohn

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Variety Critics Share Their Cannes Cinematic Wish Lists

16 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Variety‘s chief film critics Peter Debruge and Owen Gleiberman look ahead at the Cannes festival lineup and tell us what they really want to see when the festival kicks off May 17.

Peter Debruge’s Picks

The Beguiled

It’s not like the world was asking for a remake of the 1971 Clint Eastwood classic, based on the Thomas Cullinan novel about a wounded Union soldier who bewitches an entire boarding school of lonely Confederate ladies — although now that it exists, consider me intrigued. Certainly, we can expect Sofia Coppola to repair the gender balance, which is the most backwards thing about director Don Siegel’s otherwise intoxicating testosterone-fueled fantasy.

The Florida Project

It’s about time Cannes took note of one of America’s most exciting indie voices, inviting “Tangerine” director Sean Baker into the fold. Apart from a general fascination with strange contemporary subcultures, and a capacity to translate »

- Peter Debruge and Owen Gleiberman

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Cannes 2017 Lineup is High On Auteur Intrigue, Low on Safe Awards Bets

13 May 2017 11:46 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ask just about any critic heading to next week’s Cannes Film Festival for their thoughts on the lineup and you’ll get much the same verdict: On paper, at least, it’s one of the tastiest in years. Usually we speak of Cannes programmes being “front-loaded” or “back-loaded” in terms of major auteur works; this year, it’s simply loaded.

The first two days of this year’s fest alone see premieres from Todd Haynes (“Wonderstruck”), Andrei Zvyagintsev (“Loveless”), Arnaud Desplechin (“Ismael’s Ghosts”) and Claire Denis (“Black Glasses”). The last two days, by which point the crowds usually thin out, have Lynne Ramsay (“You Were Never Really Here”) and Roman Polanski (“Based on a True Story”), not to mention David Lynch’s feverishly awaited “Twin Peaks” reboot.

In between is an all-you-can-eat cinephile’s buffet boasting new works from Michael Haneke (“Happy End”), Sofia Coppola (“The Beguiled”), Noah Baumbach »

- Guy Lodge

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Cannes 2017: The Competition Has a Higher Percentage of Female Filmmakers, But It’s Still Pretty Bad

12 May 2017 6:41 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present, and future.

This year’s Cannes Film Festival comes with a statistic that’s inspiring and disheartening in equal measure: The competition lineup includes more work from female filmmakers than almost any other year of the aughts… but that still shakes out to under 16% of the total competition slate. This year’s 19-film competition lineup includes just three female filmmakers, all of whom have screened their work at the festival before, putting Palme d’Or contenders at a 15.8% female-directed rate.

Sofia Coppola will compete with her Civil War-era drama “The Beguiled;” previously, the festival premiered her “Marie Antoinette” (2006, in competition) and “The Bling Ring” (2013, Un Certain Regard). She’ll be joined by frequent Cannes attendee Naomi Kawase, bowing her “Radiance,” her seventh film to debut at the festival (she won the Camera d’Or in 1997).

Read More: Female »

- Kate Erbland

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Radiohead Frontman Thom Yorke Will Score Suspiria Remake Soundtrack

11 May 2017 4:19 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Thom Yorke will compose the score for upcoming remake of Dario Argento's 1977 cult favorite Suspiria. Italian director Luca Guadagnino (Call Me By Your Name, I Am Love) will direct the new version of the horror classic. These are going to be some mighty big shoes to fill for Yorke and Guadagnino as the score and lighting, respectively are arguably two of the most iconic features of the original Suspiria. Guadagnino has teased that he will be taking a different approach to the coloring, making it "cold, evil, and really dark." So what is Yorke's score going to sound like?

Yorke is best known for his work as the lead singer/multi-instrumentalist from Radiohead, in addition to his solo work and Atoms for Peace. He will be scoring the remake on his own. Though only speculation, the sounds of Yorke's Prophet 08 synthesizer will fit the bill perfectly. But Yorke is »

- MovieWeb

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Carol Morley to Direct Patricia Clarkson-Starrer “Out of Blue”

10 May 2017 8:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Carol Morley: Paul Marc Mitchell

A neo-noir mystery toplined by Patricia Clarkson and helmed by Carol Morley? Count us in. A press release has announced that Clarkson will star in “Out of Blue,” Morley’s follow-up to 2014’s “The Falling.”

A radical adaptation of Martin Amis’ “Night Train,” “Out of Blue” centers on homicide detective Mike Hoolihan (Clarkson), who is called to investigate an unusual case —the shooting of renowned astrophysicist and black hole expert Jennifer Rockwell. Mike “is affected in ways she struggles to comprehend,” the press release details. “Revolving around contemporary Atlanta and the mysteries of the universe,” the film unravels “a metaphysical mystery, in which Mike’s quest for the truth destabilizes her view of the world, and herself.” Morley penned the script.

Mamie Gummer (“The Good Wife”), Teyonah Parris (“Dear White People”), and Toby Jones (“Captain America”) will co-star.

Camp’s Cairo Cannon (“The Falling”) and Independent’s Luc Roeg (“We Need to Talk About Kevin”) are serving as producers.

“‘The Falling’ established Carol Morley as an exciting and unique voice in British Cinema and it’s a privilege to be producing her new film ‘Out of Blue,’” said Cannon and Roeg. “Carol has written such an original and distinctive screenplay that ‘Out of Blue’ will be sure to consolidate her reputation as one of the UK’s most dynamic directorial talents. Patricia Clarkson is an actor we have always admired and we know her Mike will be an iconic character, a complex woman on screen to watch again and again.”

Set in 1969 at an all-girls school, “The Falling” stars Maisie Williams (“Game of Thrones”) as a student in a high school overtaken by a twitching and fainting epidemic. “Dreams of a Life,” “Edge,” and “The Alcohol Years” are among Morley’s other credits.

Clarkson’s recent credits include “Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials,” “Annie,” and “Learning to Drive.” Her latest film, Sally Potter’s “The Party,” premiered at the Berlinale in February. The dark comedy hasn’t found distribution in the U.S. yet. Clarkson has a number of projects in the works, including HBO’s adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s “Sharp Objects,” and Isabel Coixet’s “The Bookshop,” a drama about a woman who opens a bookstore despite opposition from locals.

Carol Morley to Direct Patricia Clarkson-Starrer “Out of Blue” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 41 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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