6.7/10
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52 user 86 critic

Five Minutes of Heaven (2009)

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The story of former UVF member Alistair Little. Twenty-five years after Little killed Joe Griffen's brother, the media arrange an auspicious meeting between the two.

Writer:

(screenplay)
8 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Young Alistair - 1975 (as Mark Davison)
Diarmuid Noyes ...
...
Alistair's Mum - 1975
Mathew McElhinney ...
...
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Alistair's Dad - 1975
Kevin O'Neill ...
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Paula McFetridge ...
Joe's Mum - 1975
Gerry Doherty ...
Joe's Dad - 1975
Luke O'Reilly ...
Luke McEvoy ...
Aoibheann Biddle ...
Ruth Matthewson ...
...
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Storyline

In February, 1975, in Northern Ireland, seventeen year-old UVF member Alistair Little kills the catholic Jimmy Griffin in his house in Lurgan in front of his younger brother Joe Griffin. Alistair is arrested and imprisoned for twelve years while Joe is blamed by his mother for not saving his brother. Thirty-three years later, a TV promotes the meeting of Alistair and Joe in a house in River Finn, expecting the truth and the reconciliation of the murderer and the victim who actually seeks five minutes of heaven. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

To face the future, they must face the past.

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

27 February 2009 (Ireland)  »

Also Known As:

Cinco minutos de gloria  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$5,364 (USA) (21 August 2009)

Gross:

$13,217 (USA) (28 August 2009)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

| (archive footage)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The little boy he delivers the note from Liam Neeson's character was named "Liam." See more »

Goofs

In the scene when they attempt to steal the first car, the International Bar is seen on the right hand side, however this Bar was not built until the mid 2000's. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Young Alistair - 1975: [narrating] For me to talk about the man I have become, you need to know about the man I was. I was 14 when I joined the Tartan gangs, and I was 15 when I joined the UVF, the Ulster Volunteer Force. At that time, don't forget, there were riots on the streets every week; petrol bombs everyday, and that was just in our town. When you got home and switched on the TV, you could see what was happening in every other town as well, and it was like we were under siege. Fathers and brothers ...
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Connections

Featured in Maltin on Movies: Man on a Ledge (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Birth
Written and performed by David Holmes
Courtesy of Mercury Records Limited
Under license from Universal Music Operations
Published by Universal/Island Music LImited
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Strong, simple, sometimes even slow, but never irrelevant, and some great acting
6 August 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Five Minutes of Heaven (2009)

I have a confession--when the movie started I thought, okay, another pro-IRA movie with a heart. And it's not--it's a beautifully balanced movie about the personal horrors of the Northern Ireland bloodshed and the longterm aftermath as participants struggle to keep going.

The two main actors are both from Northern Ireland. Liam Neeson plays a Protestant who as a teenage killed a Catholic worker as part of the tit-for-tat violence of the time. James Nesbitt, a Roman Catholic, plays the brother of the man who was killed, and as a witness to the crime he holds a deep grudge about the murder. And in a key act of political insight, the actors were born on the opposite sides--Neeson was raised Catholic and Nesbitt raised Protestant.

The theme of the film is reconciliation in the mold of South African leader Nelson Mandela. The core of the movie is shot in a fancy Irish mansion where television crews are going to watch as the two men, mortal enemies decades before, make an effort to somehow move on, in public, on t.v.

How it goes is for you to see. The murder in the 1970s is fact, easy enough to believe, and the meeting of the men is fiction. Nesbitt is utterly terrific. You might think he's overacting (he is, of course, overacting) but it's appropriate, and gives this non-action film some intensity. Neeson is strong in his restraint and in the one main scene where he gives a well-written speech about how to understand these horrors he is also terrific.

The filming is extremely simple and in fact the whole scenario is relatively linear, even with all the flashbacks. There are some turns to the events by the last half hour, and in a way this is both the dramatic high and the disappointing low of the film (it resorts to somewhat corny and not quite smartly filmed sequences I won't elaborate). But overall the point is so strong and well meant it's hard to worry too much about whether it's a masterpiece.

It's not. It's sometimes slow, it says stuff we probably have absorbed pretty well by now, and it isn't very complex. But what it does do it does with compassion and conviction.


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