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Indie Spotlight

We return with another edition of the Indie Spotlight, highlighting recent independent horror news sent our way. Today’s feature includes details on The Book, which brings together some of the biggest names in Italian horror, a trailer for Dead of the Nite, new releases from Cavity Colors, and much more:

First Details on The Book: “The Book sees the ultimate collaborative Italian horror film unfold before your very eyes. A one off project of unprecedented scale, The Book brings together, for the very first time, the writers, directors, actors, composers and artists behind the finest Italian genre cinema of the past sixty years. This includes the creative forces behind the Giallo movement, Spaghetti Westerns, Eurocrime and more. Each director will be given the opportunity to showcase their own personal vision of Rome, spread across a dozen episodes. Each segment in this feature film will contain a unique blend of macabre thriller,
See full article at DailyDead »

Italian Horror Masters Team Up For Anthology Film The Book

If you're a fan of Italian horror films and your list of favorite filmmakers includes names like Ruggero Deodato and Lamberto Bava, then boy, are you in for a treat. Read on for all the details about an exciting upcoming horror anthology called The Book, which will only get funded with Your help!

From the Press Release

The Book sees the ultimate collaborative Italian horror film unfold before your very eyes.

A one-off project of unprecedented scale, The Book brings together, for the very first time, the writers, directors, actors, composers, and artists behind the finest Italian genre cinema of the past sixty years. This includes the creative forces behind the Giallo movement, Spaghetti Westerns, Eurocrime, and more. Each director will be given the opportunity to showcase his own personal vision of Rome, spread across a dozen episodes. Each segment in this feature film will contain a unique blend of macabre thriller,
See full article at Dread Central »

Deane Ogden: An Open Letter to People Who Make Film Music

And the Oscar goes to....

Michael Giacchino for "Up!".

Even though Jennifer Lopez and Sam Worthington butchered his name many times during their presentation for "Best Original Score" at the Academy Awards on Sunday night, there was no denying who won the award once Michael Giacchino got up and took the statue in his hands. With a simple speech about how kids who have dreams of entering into the entertainment industry should never listen to those who say it is "a waste of time", Giacchino accepted his award with grace and respect, and then went and sat back down in his seat for the rest of the show.

With a contentious race in many categories, including Best Original Score, it didn't take long before I was seeing people on Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, and Tumblr light into Giacchino, assessing his win as a "fraud", a "mistake", a "travesty", "non-deserving", and even "political" (Political?
See full article at SCOREcastOnline.com »

See. Spot. Run.

This month, as we open up a can of worms about "spotting" films, it is going to be an interesting topic of conversation. As evidenced by our ongoing Poll over there to the right of where you are reading this, composers in general feel that they have a pretty decent handle on the art and skill of spotting their films, and therefore probably don't need too comprehensive a treatise on how to go about doing it. And of course, since by now you know me well, you know what I'm going to say to that...

Most people don't get it.

Spotting is hard. It's not an easy task to undertake and it is not a common skill to possess. In fact, I would say that it is one of the most difficult aspects of scoring a film, yet it is responsible for much of what makes for a brilliant score.
See full article at SCOREcastOnline.com »

Final Thoughts on "Competition"

I think that this has been one of my favorite topics we've discussed so far. The truth is that there is so much to the topic of "competition" that pertains to this gig, we could probably have taken two months to examine it all. Maybe we'll come back and revisit it again soon. Kudos to everyone on our editorial staff for bringing their A-game this month and kicking in the doors of this topic with both feet.

As we wind down February and head into another month, and with that a new focus, here are some final thoughts I have about this month's theme of "Competition"....

In his book The Reel World, film composer Jeff Rona illustrates the importance of speed and accuracy in our trade by summing, "It's not what you can do — it's what you can do in five minutes." This couldn't be closer to the truth, and
See full article at SCOREcastOnline.com »

The Disciplines of a Winner

I cherish "verbal economy". Getting to the bottom of something — to the core level of it — while utilizing the smallest amount of verbiage possible is something that I am profoundly fascinated with. It drives me crazy when someone is trying to make a point, and instead of stating the main crux of their position, they wax on with twenty minutes of preamble.

So, I'll try my damnedest to make this intro quick and to the point.

I am supposed to talk to you today about "competition", but I don't want to, so I'm not going to. Instead, let's talk about what the very core of the word "competition" boils down to: winning and losing. And there's a lot to talk about.

Here's the deal: Right this very second, as you sit wherever you are and read this post, one of two things is taking place in your life. You are
See full article at SCOREcastOnline.com »

The "Gigs" Don't Exist

I have dinner every couple of months with a great group of working television composers. Part strategic network, part support group, our times together are always amazing and I've never not come away with either some juicy info on a cool new compositional technique or a great new way to implement some sort of hardware or software tool. Composers often get pegged for some of our antisocial behavior, but when these 20 or so composers get together, the discussion and conversation flow can be endless, and these social gatherings often drag into the wee hours of the next morning.

At the latest of these dinners this last weekend, I became engaged in a conversation about this month's topic of "Getting the Gig". It seems several of my composer pals are also heavy-duty SCOREcast readers and have been chomping at the bit to take me to task on some of our opined viewpoints on the subject.
See full article at SCOREcastOnline.com »

Getting the Gig: Balancing Your Worth With Your Wishes

Tell me if this scenario sounds familiar to you.

A filmmaker approaches you about a gig, and really wants you for the job. In your excitement, you talk through the particulars and get all of the information that you can... except for the money part. The conversation continues until, finally, there is nothing left to talk about Except for the money part, and now you are in that awkward position of doing the asking... since nobody is freely offering.

We've all heard the old saying in our profession, usually in the context of speaking to someone about a possible project: "Fast, cheap, or good. Pick two!"

To be honest, I'm not sure where this adage came from. The first time I remember hearing it was in high school when someone wanted to hire a friend of mine to paint their house. After they haggled back and forth for what seemed like 45 minutes,
See full article at SCOREcastOnline.com »

Kamen's Law: Check Your Attitude

It's no secret that 2009 was a slow year for a ton of people. Coming off the slump that the world economy has been in for the last two years, for many facets of the entertainment biz, things couldn't get much worse. As we’ve wrapped up this last year, I have heard numerous sighs of relief, seen many puffed up cheeks of exhaustion, and felt the overwhelming dark cloud of “what now?” on Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter. Generally, it seems that most of us are perfectly happy to blow a kiss goodbye to the last decade and get on with this new one that, just like that, is suddenly upon us.

As we focus on this new year, and with that, the new topic here at Sco of “Getting the Gig”, I’d like to encourage you and your business by suggesting something to you that you may not appreciate.
See full article at SCOREcastOnline.com »

"My Perfect 3": Deane Ogden

Editor's Note: In the spirit of December's theme (Gear and Software), we asked our contributors to weigh in with their Top 3 gear finds and why they like them, and we are bringing them to you in a series that we are calling "My Perfect 3". Here are the three that Deane Ogden chose, and a short rundown on why he picked them.

I have enjoyed reading everyone's Top 3 gear picks so much that I almost forgot to submit my own! It's interesting to read what people like and what they do not like, and I have been pleasantly surprised to discover that, when you read between the challenge and response codes, people's software and hardware choices more or less line up with their specific musical focus.

My passions fall somewhere between rhythmic creation and audio manipulation. I love to bend audio to My own will, and particularly, rhythmic audio. Being a percussionist,
See full article at SCOREcastOnline.com »

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