7.0/10
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Io sono l'amore (2009)

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Emma left Russia to live with her husband in Italy. Now a member of a powerful industrial family, she is the respected mother of three, but feels unfulfilled. One day, Antonio, a talented chef and her son's friend, makes her senses kindle.

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(screenplay), (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
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4,598 ( 511)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 14 wins & 37 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Maria Paiato ...
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Mattia Zaccaro ...
Ginevra Notarbartolo ...
Giangaleazzo Visconti di Modrone ...
Andrea Tavecchia
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Edoardo Recchi Senior
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Allegra Rori Recchi
Liliana Flores ...
Liliana Macedo
Jimmi Carlos Zuniga Macias ...
Joso Macedo
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Storyline

Over two decades ago, Emma left Russia to follow Tancredi Recchi, the man who had proposed to her. Now a member of a powerful industrial Milanese family, she is the respected mother of three. But Emma, although not unhappy, feels confusedly unfulfilled. One day Antonio, a talented chef and her son's friend and partner, makes her senses kindle. It does not take long before she embarks on a passionate affair with the sensuous young man. Written by Guy Bellinger

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexuality and nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

23 July 2010 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El amante  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£171,959 (UK) (9 April 2010)

Gross:

$5,004,648 (USA) (26 November 2010)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first cut of the film was approximately 210-minute long. See more »

Goofs

When a character's head strikes a brick in a fall, the brick wobbles. See more »

Quotes

Elisabetta Recchi: Happy is a word that makes one sad.
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Connections

Featured in Ebert Presents: At the Movies: Episode #1.5 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

The Chairman Dances
Composed by John Adams
Performed by Orchestra of St. Luke's
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User Reviews

 
Home Cookin'
28 June 2010 | by (Dallas, Texas) – See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. A really good film from writer/director Luca Guadagnino and a terrific performance from Tilda Swinton. The film centers on power and family and trust and self-discovery ... and the complexities of each.

As a young, working class Russian, Emma (Tilda Swinton) is whisked away to marriage and life in the aristocracy of Milan. She dutifully raises her kids and organizes huge dinners and parties at their mansion as the Rechhi's entertain business clients and their own family. It is during these parties that we realize Emma is technically part of the family, but really is still an outsider. She escapes to her own space once the events are running smoothly.

Being an avid cook herself, she easily clicks with a brilliant young chef introduced to the family by her own son. Very little doubt where it's headed at this point as Emma unleashes the pent up energy she has been forced to hide. While we are very aware that the upper crust has learned to look the other way with infidelity, that's not the case with the Rechhi's and their Russian wife/mother.

The brilliance in the film is that it shows how the younger generation doesn't really fit any better than Emma. The difference is that they are part of the fabric and will be allowed more rope than an outsider. Still it is painful to watch Emma and her son, who can't quite adapt to the family business. Better yet, to watch her with her daughter, who confesses her preference for other women. Emma sees herself in these two, but doesn't have the same freedom. Her best ally is the caretaker who seems to understand the multiple levels on which this family functions.

Fascinating interactions and complex writing make this a film for film lovers. There is so little dialogue, but so much is said with a glance or head nod. Many U.S. writers could learn a thing or two. Must also mention the startling score by John Adams. It is quite operatic, which plays along with the themes of the film.


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