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Yip Man
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Ip Man (2008) More at IMDbPro »Yip Man (original title)

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Ip Man -- Behind every great martial artist lies a teacher. 
Ip Man, starring Donnie Yen, is the award-winning film adaptation about the life story of Ip Man, grandmaster of Wing Chun and mentor to legendary kung fu superstar Bruce Lee. 

Set in Fo Shan, China during the Sino-Japanese War, Ip Man vividly brings to life the brutality of the infamous Japanese occupation, where once proud men are forced to fight to the death for a precious bag of rice. Defined by courage and humility, Ip Man, whose fighting skills are revered all over China, rises to the fore front.
Upon refusing to teach his martial arts to the invading Japanese soldiers, he is forced to fight for the honor of his country in a series of battles that will culminate in a kill-or-be-killed showdown with Japan’s greatest fighter.
Ip Man -- Plenty of martial arts action in this trailer for the period drama

Overview

User Rating:
8.1/10   178,983 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Down 5% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Edmond Wong (screenplay) and
Tai-lee Chan
Contact:
View company contact information for Ip Man on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
12 December 2008 (China) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The celebrated Kung Fu master of Bruce Lee See more »
Plot:
During the Japanese invasion of 1937, when a wealthy martial artist is forced to leave his home and work to support his family, he reluctantly agrees to train others in the art of Wing Chun for self-defense. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
14 wins & 13 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(361 articles)
Donnie Yen announces Ip Man 4
 (From Flickeringmyth. 1 October 2016, 10:40 AM, PDT)

DVD Review – Ip Man 3 (2015)
 (From Flickeringmyth. 25 April 2016, 3:05 AM, PDT)

Quick Hits: What You Should Know About 'Ip Man 3' Star Donnie Yen
 (From Fandango. 18 January 2016, 10:00 AM, PST)

User Reviews:
A Nutshell Review: Ip Man See more (155 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Donnie Yen ... Ip Man

Simon Yam ... Quan

Lynn Hung ... Cheung (as Xiong Dai Lin)

Hiroyuki Ikeuchi ... Miura

Ka Tung Lam ... Li (as Lam Ka Tung)

Siu-Wong Fan ... Jin (as Fan Sui Wong)

Xing Yu ... Lin
You-Nam Wong ... Yuan (as Wong You Nam)

Yu-Hang To ... Wei (as To Yue Hong)
Calvin Ka-Sing Cheng ... Yao (as Calvin Cheng)
Zhi-Hui Chen ... Master Liu (as Chen Zhi Hui)
Tenma Shibuya ... Sato (as Shibuya Tenma)
Li Chak ... Zhun (as Li Ze)
Shi De-Qiang ... Southern Master (as Shi De Qiang)
Zhong Zhou ... Southern Master
Jaco Bo Zhang ... Jin's Underling (as Zhang Bo)

Kong Kam ... Jin's Underling (as Jin Gang)
Lu Kai ... Jin's Underling
Siu-Hung Leung ... Green Dragon Club Master (as Leung Siu Hung)
Ming Zhe Liu ... Righteous Club Master (as Liu Ming Zhe)
Hanhao Zhong ... Cotton Mill Owner (as Zhong Han Hao)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Siu-Kwan Chan ... Waiter (uncredited)
Yu-Lam Fan ... Cotton Mill Worker (uncredited)
Chen Ka-Da ... Uncle Wong (uncredited)
Qilong Li ... Master Lei (uncredited)

Mei-Fang Lu ... Cotton Mill Worker (uncredited)
Zheng Wang ... Cotton Mill Worker (uncredited)
Xu-Feng Yang ... Cotton Mill Worker (uncredited)

Directed by
Wilson Yip 
 
Writing credits
Edmond Wong (screenplay)

Tai-lee Chan  (as Tai-Li Chan)

Produced by
Cheuk Kau Man .... assistant line producer
Kwok Lam Sin .... executive producer
Chi Pan Wong .... assistant line producer
Raymond Bak-Ming Wong .... executive producer (as Bak-Ming Wong)
Raymond Bak-Ming Wong .... producer (as Bak-Ming Wong)
Baoquan Zhang .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Kenji Kawai 
 
Cinematography by
Sing-Pui O (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Ka-Fai Cheung 
 
Art Direction by
Kenneth Mak 
 
Costume Design by
Pik Kwan Lee 
 
Makeup Department
Maggie Choy .... makeup artist
Samuel Wong .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
Cheuk Kau Man .... assistant production manager
Yuk-Lam Pang .... production manager
Eddie Wong .... assistant production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Po Chun Chan .... first assistant director
Ka-Wai Kam .... second assistant director
 
Art Department
Wai Kin Lam .... property master
Wai Yan Wong .... set designer
Hsi-Jen Yang .... props crew
 
Sound Department
Chan Wan Au .... foley artist
Wing Lai Chin .... sound recordist
George Yiu-Keung Lee .... re-recording mixer
George Yiu-Keung Lee .... sound editor
George Yiu-Keung Lee .... sound
Iván Mayoral .... sound mixer: Spanish dialogue
Terry Shek .... sound effects editor
Burnard To .... foley recordist
Kinson Tsang .... sound
Henry Yam .... foley artist
 
Visual Effects by
Ralph Chun Ho Poon .... visual effects artist
Henri Wong .... visual effects supervisor
 
Stunts
Leo Au-Yeung .... fight instructor
Sammo Kam-Bo Hung .... action director
Chun Ip .... fight consultant
Chi Kit Lee .... assistant stunt coordinator
Master Lee .... stunts
Siu-Hung Leung .... action choreographer
Ke Ming Lin .... action choreographer
Kun Wang .... stunts: China
Yu Hai Wei .... stunts: China
Guo Yang .... stunts: China
Donnie Yen .... action choreographer (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Siu-Kwan Chan .... grip
Yuk-Chuen Cheung .... gaffer
 
Other crew
Wai Kei Cheng .... script supervisor
Jennifer Dong .... creator
Chun Ip .... advisor and consultant
 
Thanks
Master Lee .... the producers wish to thank
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Yip Man" - Hong Kong (original title)
See more »
MPAA:
Rated R for violence
Runtime:
106 min
Country:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Like mentioned in the movie Ip Man's fighting style is Wing Chun. It is said to be created by two women: Ng Mui and Yim Wing Chun. According to legend, a warlord wanted to marry Yim Wing Chun but she refused. Instead challenged him to a duel. She came across Ng Mui, a Buddhist nun whom she asked for help. Together they created the art of Wing Chun which the nun named after Yim Wing Chun. Wing Chun won the fight.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: In the bedroom, when Yip Man is reading, there is a modern lamp made of matte metal.See more »
Quotes:
Ip Man:[hits Lei] Traitor!
Captain Lei Chiu:Why am I a traitor? Their deaths have got nothing to do with me. I'm just an interpreter. I need to scrape a living too!
Ip Man:Scrape a living? You watch your countrymen get beaten to death. Where's your dignity?
[walks away]
Captain Lei Chiu:I don't have any. You do. You have lots of it. If you have the guts, go beat them! Beat as many as you can! I'm an interpreter, not a traitor...
[throws book to the ground and shouts in Japanese]
Captain Lei Chiu:I'm a Chinese man!
See more »
Movie Connections:

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128 out of 159 people found the following review useful.
A Nutshell Review: Ip Man, 17 December 2008
Author: DICK STEEL from Singapore

I shall now proclaim unabashedly that I absolutely love this movie! It's been some time since we last saw a biopic on one of the Chinese's martial arts folk heroes, with Jet Li's Fearless being the last memorable one to hit the big screen. While Li lays claim to three of such roles in the iconic Wong Fei Hung (in the Tsui Hark movies), Fong Sai Yuk and Huo Yuan Jia in Fearless, after which he felt he had to hang up his martial arts roles because he thought that he had communicated all that he wanted about martial arts through these films. And thank goodness for Donnie Yen still being around to pick up from where the genre left off, and presenting a memorable role which he truly owned, with Ip Man being the first cinematic rendition of the Wing Chun martial arts grandmaster.

In this bio-pic, Ip Man, one of the earliest Wing Chun martial arts exponents credited to have propagated its popularity, gets portrayed as the best of the best in 1930s Fo Shan, China, where the bustling city has its own Martial Arts Street where countless of martial arts schools have set up shop to fuel the craze of kung fu training. With each new school, the master will pay their respects to Ip Man and to challenge him to a duel. Ip Man, an aristocrat who spends most of his quality time developing and perfecting his brand of martial arts, will take them on behind closed doors, so as not to damage his opponents' reputation nor embarrass them in public. His humility is his virtue, and his style is never violent or aggressive, which often gets assumed and mistaken for being effeminate, since Wing Chun after all was founded by a woman.

The bulk of the story gets set in the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese war, and it's not all fight and no story. Witth this historical setting, at times it does seem that there is an air of familiarity with the type of stories told, with how the Japanese Imperial Army had made life really miserable for the Chinese, and how the Chinese being fragmented in spirit, fail to unite during dire straits. More often than note, martial arts become a unifying force, and this aspect of the narrative might seem to be a walk in the usual territory.

But with its array of charismatic supporting cast with the likes of Simon Yam as Ip Man's best friend and industrialist Quan, and Lam Ka Tung as a cop turned translator, there are little nicely put sub plots which seek to expand the air of respect that Ip Man commands amongst his community. The story by Edmond Wong did not demonize all the villains, often adding a dash of empathy and sympathy to the likes of the Japanese General Miura (Hiroyuki Ikeuchi), a highly skilled exponent from the North called Zhao (Fan Siu Wong) as well as Lam's translator character who is deemed as a traitor for being in the service of the Japanese. Ip Man the family man also gets put under the spotlight, where his passion could sometimes leave him neglecting his wife and kid, and through the course of the story this focus often leaves one quite exasperated for his family's safety as he puts his countrymen above self and family when going up against the oppressive Japanese forces.

So what's the verdict on the action? Action junkies won't have to wait too long before watching Ip Man in action, and to Sammo Hung and Tony Leung Siu Hung's credit, they have intricately designed some of the most varied martial arts sequences in the movie, such as private fights in his home, a factory mêlée, a Japanese dojo battle as seen in the trailer, (which I know has actually sent some positive vibes amongst moviegoers, mouth agape at that incredible scene of Yen continuously beating down a karateka) being somewhat of a throwback and reminiscent of Bruce Lee in Fists of Fury, and a ringside duel amongst others. And it's not just Ip Man who gets in on the action, but specialized martial arts moves designed for the various practitioners as well. It's so difficult to name any particular one as a personal favorite, though I must add that you definitely won't feel short changed by the time the inevitable final battle comes rolling along and gets delivered with aplomb.

I'm no Wing Chun practitioner, but Donnie Yen has this marvelous calm and zen like approach with his Ip Man taking out his opponents quite effectively with the minimal of moves. Like Huo Yuan Jia, he doesn't deliver the killing blows to friendly opponents, but rather simulates the various hit points, which actually calls for some astonishing control of strength and precision. This approach will change of course as the opponents become anything but friendly. And unlike the usual martial arts stance of crouching low, here we see him standing tall and striking with such precision and efficiency, it's like poetry in motion with some astounding closed quarter combat utilizing plenty of upper limb strength.

With Wong Kar-wai at one point also declaring interest in making a Ip Man movie, I thought that this effort will be hard to beat, just like how Tsui Hark has crafted some of the more definitive movies in modern times about Wong Fei Hung and Jet Li benefiting from a major career boost, I'd say Ip Man just about cements Yen's reputation as a martial arts leading man, which I guess the cinematic world these days severely lacks. This has to go down in my books as one of my favorite movies of the year, and I'm already setting some money aside to get the best available edition of the DVD when it gets released. Highly recommended, so make a beeline for the box office now!

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