Critic Reviews

81

Metascore

Based on 45 critic reviews provided by Metacritic.com
100
An ordinary drama embellished and in some sense infringed on by genre elements rather than the other way around.
100
New York Magazine (Vulture)
This is by light-years the most entertaining movie of the year. How many apocalyptic sci-fi action extravaganzas leave you feeling as if the world is just beginning?
100
The beauty of this movie, both a nostalgic romp and a futuristic scream, is its stubborn insistence on getting all the trapped-in-amber details right.
100
The World's End isn't perfect - - but its best moments leave the bulk of recent American “event movies” gasping in the dust.
88
The cast is amazing, from the great duo of Frost and Pegg to the supporting players, many of whom are better known for taking on heavy dramatic fare. The editing, special effects and set design - a joy to experience.
88
It'll knock you on you ass from laughing when you're not rubbing your eyes in disbelief.
87
A knowing take on movies and maturity alike, The World's End is just as thoroughly thoughtful as those which came before it, and maybe more than ever, you'll find yourself laughing to keep from crying.
80
This is a tighter, smarter film than either Shaun of the Dead or Hot Fuzz, and buried beneath all the blue-goo aliens and terrible punning is a heartfelt meditation on the perils and pleasures of nostalgia.
80
While things get a tad buckled town in mayhem and special effects throughout the film's busy final reels, Wright spends enough time sketching out his mischievous middle-aged men so that their journey...feels worthwhile and even meaningful for a few of them.
80
Bravely refusing to rigidly adhere to a formula that has been so successful, Wright, Pegg and Frost's Cornetto Trilogy closer has tonal shifts you won't expect, but the same beating heart you've been craving.
80
The armageddon-through-beer-goggles approach brings the chuckles, but The World's End stands up as a great example of the genre it ribs. Nostalgic, bittersweet and very, very funny.
80
The World's End is a fitting end to the trilogy: it is by turns trashy, poignant and gut-bustingly funny, and often all three at once.
80
A mix of comedy, science fiction, nostalgia, adolescent wish-fulfillment and beer, beer, beer, its parts shouldn't fit together as neatly as they do. But somehow Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg have again managed to make a movie that is knowing, touching and hilarious.
80
The World's End stands on its own as hilarious high-end nonsense.
80
Some inner logic may not hold up under the sober light of day, but this unusual action-comedy has the loosey-goosey feel of something that can't miss, like a soused round of bar pool. The final triumph: In a summer full of capes and masks, beer-bellied Frost tears off his shirt à la the Hulk. It's this season's best superhero moment.
80
There is something weird about the twins, something that will fuel a bar room brawl until it goes quite literally global, that will let director Wright take a leap into another genre entirely and that will allow The World's End to spin into ever grander comic mayhem, even as it becomes a surprisingly effecting look at the folly of trying to recapture one's youth.
75
Despite its shortcomings, The World's End glistens with a comedic energy not present in equivalent mainstream blockbusters.
75
This is a movie that floats by on dazzlingly silly banter and well-slung slang.
75
Despite a too-long third act, dragging action sequences and an epilogue that would have been better left on the cutting room floor, the wordy wit and ingenuity of The World's End is a sloppy triumph over this summer's other alien/robot hybrid flick, "Pacific Rim."
75
The result is an original picture, not entirely successful, but successful enough, and delightful in its ability to surprise viewers, and juggle tones and keep every ball in the air. The World's End has the aura - and this might only be an attractive illusion - of something imagined whole, in a burst of inspiration, rather than as something labored over.
75
Smart, funny, and gross (often at the same time).
70
A fraction less gut-bustingly goofy than its predecessors.
63
The premise of visiting so many pubs as a narrative device, however, bogs down the initially energetic pacing and goofiness. Piling on the mayhem renders The World's End a sometimes chaotic and uneven comedy.
58
As a film whose central theme emphasizes the dangers of living in the past, Wright, Pegg and Frost become fatally distracted by nostalgia, eventually paying too much homage to previous classics-especially their own-to create another film that deserves to stand alongside them.

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