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Lost Nation: The Ioway (2007)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 11 October 2007 (USA)
In the twilight of a Native American empire, two Ioway brothers travel to Washington, D. C. in 1824 to meet with Superintendent of Indian Affairs, William Clark. Both sign a treaty ceding a... See full summary »

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2 wins. See more awards »

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Lance Foster ...
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Storyline

In the twilight of a Native American empire, two Ioway brothers travel to Washington, D. C. in 1824 to meet with Superintendent of Indian Affairs, William Clark. Both sign a treaty ceding a large portion of tribal land for settlement. White Cloud sees cooperation as the only way for his people to survive, while Great Walker regrets the loss of land where his ancestors are buried. More territory is lost, and the Ioway people are divided, with some regarding one brother as a traitor, and the other as a patriot. After the tribe is removed, the 36 million acres they once called home is named "Iowa". Then, they are forgotten. "Lost Nation: The Ioway" tells the dramatic true tale of two brothers' struggle to save their people from inevitable American conquest, and the Ioway's current fight to reclaim and maintain their unique history and culture. Written by Kelly Rundle

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ioway | native american | iowa | See All (3) »

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A Forgotten Tale of American Conquest and Native Survival

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Documentary

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Not Rated
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11 October 2007 (USA)  »

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1.85 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Effect of treatment of Native Americans
24 April 2008 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I possess "Villisca: Living with a mystery. I expected a professional treatment of their newest documentary and was not disappointed.

There can not be a revelation of the plot of this documentary because, by intent, there is not a plot. The viewer is offered a visual trip and a confrontation with the participants of the movie.

The questions implied after viewing is, or might be, the purpose of the movie. Are Native Americans viewed by themselves and others as a foreigner in their own country? What will be the legacy fifty or one-hundred years from now? Lacking a specific "trail of tears" are the results the same for the Ioway and other tribes similar? One travels with some members of the tribe the same areas and suggests the environment of the past as well as today. The continuity of the film and comments by the Indians as well as historians are interjected trough out to further illustrate the past and connect to the future.

One can be assured that they are treated with the respect and dignity you should expect from a serious visual historian. Adding this film to your library can only enhance your appreciation of the various people that are part of our lives and our history.

David H. Tharp


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