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Building the Greatest Dam in the World (1912)

With the exception of the Panama Canal, the engineering works in progress at Keokuk, Iowa, are the greatest in the world. The dam across the Mississippi is approaching completion and it has... See full summary »
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With the exception of the Panama Canal, the engineering works in progress at Keokuk, Iowa, are the greatest in the world. The dam across the Mississippi is approaching completion and it has involved the building of the largest monolithic concrete structure in existence. Such an undertaking as this necessitated some great mechanical and constructional devices. The picture includes views of the work as it is being carried out. For example, we see huge concrete mixers with a capacity of 1,500 cubic yards per day, and we see rock being crushed at the rate of 500 car loads. There is a power-house, a third of a mile long. An inclined railway carries material to the concrete mixers; a very large cantilever traveling crane places the concrete in the dam. There is a view of a great new lock in course of construction. It was necessary to saw a channel in the bedrock of the American continent and the work of doing it is shown. Excavators, traveling cranes, concrete dumpers, and other great ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Documentary | Short

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22 January 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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An engineer might get a great deal of valuable instruction from this picture
13 August 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This immense dam in the Mississippi River has been photographed by the Imp people in some excellent moving pictures. Big works like this really need a clear lecture to be understood by the people. The things shown are but processes on a very large scale of such building operations as nearly everyone is familiar with. An engineer might get a great deal of valuable instruction from this picture. It will interest the average spectator also. The name of the dam and its locality should have been added to the title. The photographs are fair. It will make a desirable filler where the audience is of a mechanical turn of mind or is broadly informed. - The Moving Picture World, February 3, 1912


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